References of "Gailly, Robin"
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See detailFlexible habitat use of stonechats Saxicola torquatus dealing with different anthropogenic novel environments
Gailly, Robin ULiege; Cousseau, Laurence; Titeux, Nicolas et al

Conference (2018, December 15)

Organisms may respond to rapid human induced environmental changes by adapting their habitat requirements through behavioural flexibility. In human-modified landscapes from southern Belgium, recent ... [more ▼]

Organisms may respond to rapid human induced environmental changes by adapting their habitat requirements through behavioural flexibility. In human-modified landscapes from southern Belgium, recent management activities have generated structurally different and novel land-use types that are now occupied by a number of farmland bird species. However, as birds rely on environmental cues to select their habitat, they can be subject to maladaptive habitat selection if these cues become uncoupled from the underlying habitat quality. We therefore used the European Stonechat Saxicola torquatus as a model species to compare the relative attractiveness and breeding quality of the three main land-use types occupied by farmland birds (i.e. intensive grassland, Christmas tree plantations and clear-cut patches in plantation forests) in order to test whether habitat selection is adaptive in a changing landscape. Between 2014 and 2018, we examined the settlement pattern of territorial males to measure habitat preference and we recorded key parameters reflecting reproductive performances and individual survival to assess the quality of the three land-use types for the reproduction of the stonechats. Our results indicate that stonechats preferentially settle in clear-cut patches where they produce lower-quality offspring due to a gradual decrease of nestling body conditions during the breeding season. However, we found that this has no consequence on recruitment rates, because first-year survival was not related to nestling body conditions in our study system. As other parameters of reproductive performances, adult survival and first-year survival were similar between the three land-use types, we concluded that stonechats are capable of flexible habitat use and may find breeding opportunities of similar quality in the three land-use types although these strongly differ in terms of vegetation structure and management. Moreover, our results highlight the importance of measuring multiple fitness components to assess habitat quality in a comprehensive way. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Tarier pâtre pour comparer des habitats
Gailly, Robin ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

Comparison of habitat preference and breeding success of the Stonechat between grasslands, clear-cuts and Christmas tree plantations? Is the habitat selection adaptive in a farmland-woodland landscape ... [more ▼]

Comparison of habitat preference and breeding success of the Stonechat between grasslands, clear-cuts and Christmas tree plantations? Is the habitat selection adaptive in a farmland-woodland landscape? - Population dynamics of Stonechat: the use of color-ringing. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Tarier pâtre pour comparer des habitats. Quelle qualité pour les plantations de sapins de Noël.
Gailly, Robin ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

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See detailEffects of the conversion of intensive grasslands into Christmas tree plantations on bird assemblages
Gailly, Robin ULiege; Paquet, Jean-Yves; Titeux, Nicolas et al

in Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment (2017), 247

Over the last decade, the conversion of annual-rotation based crops or grassland areas into non-food perennial crops has been increasingly prevalent in European farming systems. This shift is associated ... [more ▼]

Over the last decade, the conversion of annual-rotation based crops or grassland areas into non-food perennial crops has been increasingly prevalent in European farming systems. This shift is associated with major changes in management practices and has created new environmental conditions and resources for wildlife. Impacts on birds have been examined for bioenergy agricultural systems, such as miscanthus plantations and short-rotation willow coppice. However, they remain largely unknown for Christmas tree plantations (CTPs) that have recently increased considerably in some European countries. We examined the extent to which CTPs alter bird species assemblages in the farmland areas of southern Belgium, where they mainly replace intensive grassland. The abundance of birds was recorded during the breeding season in randomly selected sites located in grassland and in CTP. Results show that introduction of CTP into landscapes dominated by grassland with low hedge densities locally increases bird species richness and abundance without leading to biotic homogenization. Differences in species richness and abundance between grassland and CTP decrease with increasing hedge densities. A community analysis indicates that the plantation of Christmas trees enriches the bird assemblage of intensive grassland areas. In intensive grassland with few hedges, small-size CTPs could constitute an option to increase structural heterogeneity and provide new potential breeding conditions for some farmland birds. However, questions remain about the genuine quality of the resources available in CTP and further research is needed to examine the breeding success and survival of birds that settle in this type of habitat. [less ▲]

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See detailAre Christmas tree plantations a suitable habitat for farmland birds?
Gailly, Robin ULiege; Paquet, Jean-Yves; Titeux, Nicolas et al

Conference (2016, September 06)

Over the last decade, nonfood perennial crops have been increasingly prevalent in European farming systems. Here, vegetation structure and crop management greatly differ from conventional crops and may ... [more ▼]

Over the last decade, nonfood perennial crops have been increasingly prevalent in European farming systems. Here, vegetation structure and crop management greatly differ from conventional crops and may likely impact farmland birds. Impacts on birds have been examined for bioenergy agricultural systems, such as miscanthus plantations and short rotation willow coppice. In Europe, the extend of Christmas tree plantations (CTP) has recently increased dramatically in farmland but their impacts on farmland birds remains largely unknown. We examined the extent to which CTP in southern Belgium alter bird species assemblages compared to traditional farmland. The presence and abundance of birds were recorded twice during a breeding season in randomly selected sites located in farmland areas with and without CTP. Results show that the conversion of traditional farmland into CTP modifies bird species assemblages and locally increases bird diversity and density without inducing biotic homogenization. This observed pattern indicates that CTP might constitute an interesting alternative habitat for farmland birds. However bird presence or abundance may be confounding indicator of habitat quality because individuals may be attracted to low-quality habitats in human modified landscapes. The European Stonechat Saxicola rubicola was chosen as a model species to investigate the quality of CTP as a breeding habitat in more details. Habitat quality in CTP was assessed with measures of reproductive success and survival. These measures were compared with those collected in traditional farmland. Although vegetation structure, field management and nest placement are highly different between habitat types, our first results suggest that CTP are not of lesser quality than traditional farmland for the European Stonechat. [less ▲]

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See detailAre Christmas tree plantations a suitable habitat for farmland birds?
Gailly, Robin ULiege; Paquet, Jean-Yves; Titeux, Nicolas et al

Poster (2016, September 06)

Over the last decade, nonfood perennial crops have been increasingly prevalent in European farming systems. Here, vegetation structure and crop management greatly differ from conventional crops and may ... [more ▼]

Over the last decade, nonfood perennial crops have been increasingly prevalent in European farming systems. Here, vegetation structure and crop management greatly differ from conventional crops and may likely impact farmland birds. Impacts on birds have been examined for bioenergy agricultural systems, such as miscanthus plantations and short rotation willow coppice. In Europe, the extend of Christmas tree plantations (CTP) has recently increased dramatically in farmland but their impacts on farmland birds remains largely unknown. We examined the extent to which CTP in southern Belgium alter bird species assemblages compared to traditional farmland. The presence and abundance of birds were recorded twice during a breeding season in randomly selected sites located in farmland areas with and without CTP. Results show that the conversion of traditional farmland into CTP modifies bird species assemblages and locally increases bird diversity and density without inducing biotic homogenization. This observed pattern indicates that CTP might constitute an interesting alternative habitat for farmland birds. However bird presence or abundance may be confounding indicator of habitat quality because individuals may be attracted to low-quality habitats in human modified landscapes. The European Stonechat Saxicola rubicola was chosen as a model species to investigate the quality of CTP as a breeding habitat in more details. Habitat quality in CTP was assessed with measures of reproductive success and survival. These measures were compared with those collected in traditional farmland. Although vegetation structure, field management and nest placement are highly different between habitat types, our first results suggest that CTP are not of lesser quality than traditional farmland for the European Stonechat. [less ▲]

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See detailPromoting quarries biodiversity through partnerships: a Belgian case study
Seleck, Maxime ULiege; Harzé, Mélanie ULiege; Pitz, Carline ULiege et al

Conference (2015, August 25)

Throughout the life cycle of quarries, a large diversity of temporary habitats is generated, sometimes left to evolve to more permanent ones. In many cases, the biological roles of quarries are neglected ... [more ▼]

Throughout the life cycle of quarries, a large diversity of temporary habitats is generated, sometimes left to evolve to more permanent ones. In many cases, the biological roles of quarries are neglected though they are playing a significant role as stepping-stones and regulating green infrastructure in landscapes. In highly urbanized and controlled landscapes, quarries are an exceptional opportunity to maintain rare and threatened transient habitats hosting fugitive species. Such ephemeral biodiversity is hard to manage through a site legal protection status. As exploitation progresses, more permanent, biodiverse habitats settle in abandoned areas but the biologic potential could also be maximized by optimized groundwork through the whole exploitation process. Exploitation plans taking into consideration biodiversity could allow maximizing quarry biodiversity hosting capacity during the exploitation phase and in further rehabilitation schemes. Since 2012 Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech (University of Liège) provides support to FEDIEX - the Belgian federation of extractive industries – in its implementation of a sectorial charter on “Quarries and Biodiversity” that aims at i) raising members’ awareness; ii) promoting the integration of practical recommendations for the protection and management of biodiversity in exploitation plans; iii) quarries’ personnel trainings. Our presentation will trace realizations undertaken under this collaboration, among which the “Mr/Ms Biodiversity” training organized in 2013, 2014 and 2015, the publication of folders popularising the management and enhancement of nature in active quarries and the collaboration in the redaction of a “LIFE in Quarries” project (LIFE Biodiversity) submitted for the 2014 LIFE call. [less ▲]

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See detailCarrières et Biodiversité : Les Oiseaux
Gailly, Robin ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

Reconnaissance et bonnes pratiques de gestion des espèces d’oiseaux liées à l'activité d’extraction

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See detailHivernage de deux Tichodromes échelettes Tichodrama muraria en Wallonie en 2014-2015
Gailly, Robin ULiege; Mathelart, Charlotte

in Aves (2015), 52(4), 193-205

The Wallcreeper Tichodroma muraria is a rare wintering bird in Wallonia but is probably under detected. Specific research allowed finding a bird in Dinant on 30th December 2014. The wintering of that bird ... [more ▼]

The Wallcreeper Tichodroma muraria is a rare wintering bird in Wallonia but is probably under detected. Specific research allowed finding a bird in Dinant on 30th December 2014. The wintering of that bird was followed until its departure on 8th April 2015. The wintering range extended on a 2km-part of the Haute-Meuse valley including natural cliffs and buildings including the citadel. This article describes visited places, the roosting site and partial moult to the breeding plumage. A second wintering bird was found on 7th February 2015 in a quarry in the Ourthe valley and stayed until end of March. This is the first reported case of a simultaneous wintering of two Wallcreepers in Wallonia. A better prospecting of suitable sites could bring out wintering birds more regularly in Wallonia. [less ▲]

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