References of "Fias, Wim"
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See detailThe Mental Whiteboard Hypothesis on Serial Order in Working Memory
Abrahamse, Elger; Van Dijck, Jean-Philippe; Majerus, Steve ULiege et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014), 8

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See detailCommon neural substrates for ordinal numerical representations and ordinal representations in short-term memory
Attout, Lucie ULiege; Fias, Wim; Majerus, Steve ULiege

Poster (2013, June)

The current study explores the hypothesis that the neural substrates allowing for coding of ordinal information in the numerical domain also support the coding of order information in STM. We designed an ... [more ▼]

The current study explores the hypothesis that the neural substrates allowing for coding of ordinal information in the numerical domain also support the coding of order information in STM. We designed an fMRI experiment with 26 young adults that directly compared ordinal processing in numerical and STM tasks, by comparing the neural substrates of ordinal distance effects in numerical judgment and order STM tasks. Null conjunction analysis over the distance effects in both STM and numerical processing tasks confirmed that the IPS regions supporting the distance effects were indeed overlapping in both conditions and this overlap of neural activation in IPS areas was not driven by mere differences in task difficulty of the distances to be judged, since the distance effects in IPS regions for the STM and numerical tasks remained significant after controlling for any IPS activity related to non-ordinal distance judgment in the luminance control condition. These findings constitute a first direct demonstration of shared neural correlates for processing of order information in the STM and number domains, via the assessment of neural substrates associated with ordinal distance effects in both domains. [less ▲]

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See detailExploration of the mechanisms underlying the ISPC effect: Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging data
Grandjean, Julien; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULiege; Fias, Wim et al

in Neuropsychologia (2013), 51

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest ... [more ▼]

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest since the original study by Jacoby (2003). Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the effect: associative learning of contingencies and item-specific control through word reading modulation. Both interpretations have received empirical support from behavioral data. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the responsible mechanisms of the ISPC effect with the classic two-item sets design using fMRI. Results showed that the ISPC effect is associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC), and inferior and superior parietal cortex. Importantly, behavioral and fMRI analyses specifically addressing the respective contribution of associative learning and item-specific control mechanisms brought support for the contingency learning account of the ISPC effect. Results are discussed in reference to task and procedure characteristics that may influence the extent to which item-specific control and/or contingency learning contribute to the ISPC effect. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of cognitive control at the item level in the Stroop task.
Grandjean, Julien ULiege; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULiege; Fias, Wim et al

Poster (2010, November 15)

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See detailNeural correlates of cognitive control at the item specific level in the Stroop task
Grandjean, Julien ULiege; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULiege; Fias, Wim et al

Poster (2010, May 04)

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See detailThe commonality of neural networks for verbal and visual short-term memory.
Majerus, Steve ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Martinez Perez, Trecy ULiege et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22(11), 2570-2593

Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared ... [more ▼]

Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared neural correlates supporting verbal and visual STM. We hypothesized that networks involved in attentional and executive processes, as well as networks involved in serial order processing, underlie STM for both verbal and visual list information, with neural specificity restricted to sensory areas involved in processing the specific items to be retained. Participants were presented sequences of nonwords or unfamiliar faces, and were instructed to maintain and recognize order or item information. For encoding and retrieval phases, null conjunction analysis revealed an identical fronto-parieto-cerebellar network comprising the left intraparietal sulcus, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral cerebellum, irrespective of information type and modality. A network centered around the right intraparietal sulcus supported STM for order information, in both verbal and visual modalities. Modality-specific effects were observed in left superior temporal and mid-fusiform areas associated with phonological and orthographic processing during the verbal STM tasks, and in right hippocampal and fusiform face processing areas during the visual STM tasks, wherein these modality effects were most pronounced when storing item information. The present results suggest that STM emerges from the deployment of modality-independent attentional and serial ordering processes toward sensory networks underlying the processing and storage of modality-specific item information. [less ▲]

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