References of "Fauconnier, Marie-Laure"
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See detailBioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of Pimpinella anisum L. accessions at different ripening stages
Bettaieb Rebey, Iness; Aidi Wannes, Wissem; Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege et al

in Scientia Horticulturae (2019), 246

Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of four aniseed populations (Egyptian, Serbian, Tunisian and Turkish) were investigated during three developmental stages. The highest oil yield was achieved ... [more ▼]

Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of four aniseed populations (Egyptian, Serbian, Tunisian and Turkish) were investigated during three developmental stages. The highest oil yield was achieved at full maturity in all aniseed accessions ranged from 11.93% (Serbia) to 13.80% (Tunisia). Fatty acid profile of aniseed oil was characterized by high proportions of palmitic (4.90–57.18%) and petroselinic (10.48–46.60%) acids which had an antagonist evolution during maturation. The essential oil yield reached its maximum at the beginning of ripening process in all aniseed accessions ranged from 1.94% (Serbia) to 3.09% (Tunisia). The main essential oil compound was trans-anethole (66.34–93.05%) during aniseed ripening in all accessions. Phenolic content patronized its maximum at the last stage of aniseed ripening ranged from 17.11 mg GAE/g DW (Serbia) to 25.16 mg GAE/g DW (Tunisia). The main phenolic compound of aniseed was naringin (17.55–32.49%) and its accumulation was followed by the reduction of gallic, rosmarinic, ellargic and syringic acids during aniseed ripening in all accessions. Concerning antioxidant activity, DPPH scavenging activity, chelating ability and reducing power were maximal at full maturity in all aniseed accessions. Our findings indicate that the determination of optimal periods and provenances for antioxidant accumulation can be used to evaluate the quality of aniseeds and could be important for industries. [less ▲]

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See detailNew insights into the biosynthesis of esterified oxylipins and their involvement in plant defense and developmental mechanisms
Genva, Manon ULiege; Obounou Akong, Firmin ULiege; Andersson, Mats X. et al

in Phytochemistry Reviews (2018)

Plant oxylipins produced following oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids are structurally diverse metabolites that play crucial developmental and defensive roles. Whereas free oxylipins are well studied ... [more ▼]

Plant oxylipins produced following oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids are structurally diverse metabolites that play crucial developmental and defensive roles. Whereas free oxylipins are well studied, oxylipins esterified in complex lipids such as galacto- and phospholipids are thought to be rare and have unclear roles. In the last few years, new analytical methods have been developed, leading to the discovery of many esterified oxylipins in a variety of plant species. This suggests that these molecules may be ubiquitous plant metabolites. While their precise functions are unclear, esterified oxylipins seem to play important roles in plant development and defense. This review focuses on new insights regarding diversity, biosynthesis and function of those interesting and understudied molecules. [less ▲]

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See detailOxylipins are involved in plant protections processes and are potential biocontrol agents
Deboever, Estelle ULiege; Genva, Manon ULiege; Deleu, Magali ULiege et al

Conference (2018, September 27)

Nowadays, biopesticides have emerged as a main alternative to conventional agriculture. In this context, plant oxylipins, a vast and diverse family of secondary metabolites originated from polyunsaturated ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, biopesticides have emerged as a main alternative to conventional agriculture. In this context, plant oxylipins, a vast and diverse family of secondary metabolites originated from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), appear to be crucial agents in plant defence mechanisms. Among plant oxylipins, the 13-hydroperoxy oxylipins (13-HPO) constitute key intermediate oxylipins (KIOs) as they can be converted into jasmonic acid, OPDA, dn-OPDA or traumatic acid, well-characterized components involved in plant resistance mechanisms [1][2]. Their presumed functions include direct antimicrobial effect, stimulation of plant defence gene expression, and/or regulation of plant cell death [3]. Otherwise, OPDA and dn-OPDA were also found esterified in more complex structures such as galactolipids. Those compounds are called arabidopsides. However, the precise contribution of each of those molecules in plant defence remains unknown. The first part of this study aims to understand the oxylipins action mechanisms and especially their membrane activities. As arabidopsides are produced under stress and localized at the chloroplast membranes, their interactions with those were studied using biomimetic membranes via a complementary in silico informatics and in vitro biophysical approaches. On the other hand, as KIOs are found in the literature to be potential biocontrol agents, there effect on different pathogens of agronomic interest were studied in vitro, by the same approach. As far as arabidopsides are concerned, results show that they possess different interfacial properties compared to major chloroplast lipids, which they are produced from. Arabidopsides modify the fluidity and permeabilize chloroplast membranes. As chloroplast membrane lipid composition is essential to its photosynthetic ability, such changes in its composition under stress will affect its function. Concerning KIOs, they seem to interact with pathogens plasma membranes. Indeed, in vitro assays show that KIOs can hinder growth of some plant microbial pathogens, with differences between strains and KIOs forms. [less ▲]

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See detailHow could the herbicidal effects of selected essential oil compounds be related to their membrane activity ?
Lins, Laurence ULiege; Bettaieb, Ines; Dal Maso, Simon ULiege et al

Poster (2018, September 25)

The European legislation on plant protection products (PPP) is about to undergo important changes in the coming years. The chemical PPP destined to be removed from the European market are responsible for ... [more ▼]

The European legislation on plant protection products (PPP) is about to undergo important changes in the coming years. The chemical PPP destined to be removed from the European market are responsible for the appearance of resistance phenomena to plants pests. It is therefore necessary to explore new alternatives, one of them being the search for natural herbicides. Essential oils (EO) could provide a welcome alternative due to their proven activity as PPP. Even if these compounds seem to have a bright future as PPP, their activity is mainly approached through empirical observations. EO are also a complex mix of of different molecules that could act individually or in synergy. Particularly, very little is known when it comes to molecular mechanisms of action and the relations between structure and activity of the active compounds. This study aims to investigate the structure/activity relationships of some EO molecules, among which cinnamaldehyde (CIN) from cinnamon and citronellal and citronellol from lemongrass. Due to their lipophilic properties, EO tend to interact with one or more of the layers found in the outer plant tissues, among which the cell membranes. For cinnalmaldehyde (and other EO compounds), it has been shown that they are able to interact with bacterial phospholipids and induce change in lipid organization (fluidity, packing,..) on model lipid monolayers (Nowotarska et al, 2014). Citronnellol was notably shown to displace cholesterol from its phospholipid complexes (Lange, Y et al, 2009). However, nothing is known about any interaction with lipids specific to plant plasma membrane (PPM). In this study, we analyzed the effects of the above three EO compounds on model PPM by complementary in vitro and in silico biophysical approaches. We showed that the three compounds have differential effects on plant lipids and different herbicidal properties on plantae. While part of the herbicidal activity could be related to membrane perturbation, some clues remain to be elucidated. Future studies at a molecular point of view would help to better decipher the herbicidal action involving the membrane, other outer plant tissues such as the cuticule and/or and a potential effect on EO compounds on proteins or genomic DNA, as it was shown for CIN on E. Coli (He, TF et al, 2018). [less ▲]

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See detailEncapsulation of Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt and Cinnamomum verum Presl essential oils with glycerodendrimers in order to create a biosourced herbicide
Maes, Chloé ULiege; Bouquillon, Sandrine; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege

Poster (2018, September)

The long-term harmful effects of chemical pesticides are one of the major controversies these days. Following the objective of reducing the use of these products without decreasing crop yield, essential ... [more ▼]

The long-term harmful effects of chemical pesticides are one of the major controversies these days. Following the objective of reducing the use of these products without decreasing crop yield, essential oils (EOs) are a prime candidate for biocontrol. However, high volatility of EOs begets a challenge: increasing the duration of efficient activity of EOs. In this work, an innovative green matrix for essential oil retention is proposed. Indeed, glycerol carbonate surface-modified dendrimers (GDs) have shown their ability to encapsulate some metallic complexes and organic compounds (Balieu S. et al., 2013; Menot B. et al., 2015). As a consequence; the final goal is to produce an efficient slow release biosourced herbicide based on a glycerodendrimer - essential oil combination. Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt and Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume essential oils have been chosen for their herbicide properties. The total retention rate and a quantification of the main compounds was determined by dynamic headspace gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (Kfoury M. et al., 2015). Results show that dendrimers encapsulate essential oils with some efficiency, which is influenced by dendrimer structure, size, concentration and stirring duration. Furthermore, interactions between GDs and EOs were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. In parallel, efficiency of created products has been controlled by analyzing both the inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliania seed germination and the herbicide effect on plantlets of the same plant. The talk will focus on optimization of the EOs retention by biobased dendrimers, the interactions mechanisms and their efficiency as biosourced herbicide. [less ▲]

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See detailInteraction between Halyomorpha halys Stål and its host plant: induced defense and feeding behavior
Serteyn, Laurent ULiege; Ponnet, Lola; Saive, Matthew ULiege et al

Poster (2018, July)

Halyomorpha halys Stål (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae), the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), is native to Eastern Asia, where it feeds on a large diversity of host plants. BMSB has been accidentally ... [more ▼]

Halyomorpha halys Stål (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae), the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), is native to Eastern Asia, where it feeds on a large diversity of host plants. BMSB has been accidentally introduced in Switzerland, Europe, where first observations occurred in 2007. It is probable that the pest will have colonized a large part of Europe within the next decades. It is therefore crucial to better understand its biology to develop efficient control strategies. Phytophagous Pentatomidae use different feeding strategies according to the plant tissue. On seeds, they apply a cell rupturing strategy, while on leaves and stems, they secrete a salivary sheath to facilitate the penetration of the stylets through the cells. Regarding their feeding strategies, they are more likely to induce mainly the jasmonic acid pathway as a plant defensive response. Yet, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the behavioral and physiological response of an insect exposed to an elicited plant. Therefore, we aimed to enlighten the interactions between BMSB and one of its host plant, focusing on: (1) the validation of the hypothesis that jasmonic acid pathway is induced by this insect feeding; (2) whether other individuals are subsequently able to detect that response and adapt their feeding strategies or salivary compounds. Our results highlighted a local and systemic defensive response in leaves after an attack by BMSB or after its saliva injection. Furthermore, we proposed a first description of electrical penetration graph waveforms for that pest. Then we showed some differences in feeding behavior parameters and in salivary compounds according to the plant treatment. We replaced these results in the context of such a polyphagous invasive species and its ability to overcome the plant defense to successfully settle and feed. [less ▲]

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See detailHow cadmium affects the fitness and the glucosinolate content of oilseed rape plantlets
Durenne, Bastien ULiege; Druart, Philippe; Blondel, Alodie et al

in Environmental and Experimental Botany (2018)

Secondary metabolites such as glucosinolates (GSLs) are involved in plant response to biotic stress but can be significantly influenced by abiotic factors as well. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L ... [more ▼]

Secondary metabolites such as glucosinolates (GSLs) are involved in plant response to biotic stress but can be significantly influenced by abiotic factors as well. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) produces large quantities of several GSLs both in seeds and at the vegetative stage. These sulfur-containing compounds are known to play an important role in cadmium stress tolerance within the Brassicaceae family probably due to specific cross-talk between the S primary and secondary metabolism. Sulfur assimilation is in the middle of multiple metabolic pathways including Cd stress responses at physiological level. Our research focused on the assessment of GSL profiles and content in the roots and shoots of 28-day-old winter oilseed rape plantlets. The study was conducted under in vitro sterile conditions using concentration gradients of 0, 5, 15 and 45 µM of cadmium. A phenotypic analysis was carried out at the end of this experiment in order to evaluate the plantlets’ fitness. Our results described hormetic growth curves for root elongation, root biomass and shoot biomass at Cd concentrations of 5 µM and 15 µM respectively. Our experiment shows that a concentration of 5 µM can be considered as non-toxic, while one of 45 µM represents a lethal dose. Strong relationships were found between Cd accumulated in roots or translocated to shoots and the total sulfur accumulation in the plantlets’ different organs. A decrease of both indole and aliphatic GSL content associated with an increase of Cd accumulation and an increase of total sulfur accumulation was observed in the roots and shoots of the plantlets. It was also further demonstrated that Cd stress has a highly significant effect on roots’ and shoots’ GSL content bringing new insights into GSL’s possible role in the priming of Cd stress. [less ▲]

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See detailEco-extraction of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) seed oil
Bettaieb Rebey, Iness; Bourgou, Soumaya; Detry, Pauline et al

Poster (2018, June 21)

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See detailCatalyse enzymatique en milieu non conventionnel
Bouquillon, Sandrine; Hayouni, Safa; Maes, Chloé ULiege et al

Conference (2018, June 14)

La présentation décrira la préparation de liquides ioniques biosourcés en utilisant comme produits de départ entre autres des acides dérivés de la biomasse et du glycérol en respectant au mieux les ... [more ▼]

La présentation décrira la préparation de liquides ioniques biosourcés en utilisant comme produits de départ entre autres des acides dérivés de la biomasse et du glycérol en respectant au mieux les principes de chimie verte ; leurs caractéristiques physico-chimiques et l’influence des réactifs biosourcés sur l’écotoxicité seront données. [less ▲]

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See detailCatalyse enzymatique en milieu non conventionnel (CENZYNC)
Bouquillon, Sandrine; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege

Report (2018)

Le projet initial avait pour but dans un premier temps, de préparer des liquides ioniques biosourcés à partir de choline ou de glycérol en respectant au mieux les principes de chimie verte et de les ... [more ▼]

Le projet initial avait pour but dans un premier temps, de préparer des liquides ioniques biosourcés à partir de choline ou de glycérol en respectant au mieux les principes de chimie verte et de les analyser de façon classique (RMN, analyse élémentaire ou masse) et de façon plus spécifique (ATG, DSC, viscosité etc…). La seconde partie du projet était destinée à utiliser ces liquides ioniques en catalyse enzymatique (préparation par voie enzymatique d’esters biologiquement actifs (sucroesters, utilisation de lipases) ou transformation de glucosinolates en désulfoglucosinolates (utilisation de sulfatases) en comparaison avec d’autres liquides ioniques plus classiquement utilisés pour ce genre de réactions. La partie synthèse des liquides ioniques biosourcés a été réalisée avec succès ; les réactions enzymatiques en milieu ionique classique ont également été réalisées. Par contre, comme les résultats de réactions enzymatiques en milieu liquide ionique biosourcé n’ont pas fourni de résultats concluants, ces liquides ioniques ont été testés comme encapsulants de molécules constituant des huiles essentielles, cette thématique rentrant dans le champ de la volatolomique développée au sein du laboratoire belge. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of Tunisian plant extracts as bioherbicide
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; Rebey Bettaieb, Ines; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege et al

Conference (2018, May 22)

Weeds constantly compete with crops for water and nutrient resources reducing yield, quality and consequently causing huge economic losses (Araniti et al., 2015) that can rise up to 34% in major crops ... [more ▼]

Weeds constantly compete with crops for water and nutrient resources reducing yield, quality and consequently causing huge economic losses (Araniti et al., 2015) that can rise up to 34% in major crops (Jabran et al., 2015). Actually, the current trend is to find a biological product to minimize the perceived impacts from synthetic herbicides in agriculture production (Sbai et al., 2016). In this context, the herbicidal activity of ten crude different extracts obtained from aerial parts of Tunisian spontaneous plants was determined on post-emergence at 7.5, 20 and 34 g/L against Trifolium incanatum, sylibum marianum and Phalaris minor. Aerial plant materials were grounded and macerated with methanol for 24H. Methanol was then eliminated using a rotavapor. The yield of plant extracts varied between 5.29% and 29.71 % following the species. Extracts 6, 8, and 3 exhibit the best activity in terms of visual effect by spraying on weeds. Moreover, a formulation was carried out to improve their efficiency. The results showed that formulated E6 has completely punctured Trifolium incanatum and has inhibited growth of Phalaris minor and Sylibum marianum. A fractionation of E6 was then carried out. Five fractions were obtained and tested on Trifolium incanatum. Among these fractions, F2 formulated at 20 g/L showed a very similar effect to a commercial bioherbicide. It caused the total death of Trifolium incanatum 9 days after spraying. Based on bioassay-guided fractionation, five compounds were identified which can be employed in developing new types of bioherbicides for controlling weeds on crops. In addition, the strong weed suppressive ability of formulated F2 therefore offers interesting possibilities as an effective natural environment-friendly approach for weed management. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of fungal volatile organic compounds emitted during quorum sensing as potential biocontrol agents
De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Jallais, Lucie; Vangoethem, Valentine et al

Conference (2018, May 22)

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See detailValorization Challenges to Almonds and their Co-products: Characterization of Oils Extracted from Broken Almonds Springing from Shelling and Sorting Operations.
Elamrani, Ahmed; Melhaoui, Reda; Houmy, Nadia ULiege et al

Conference (2018, May 09)

The almond tree (Prunus dulcis) is one of the most popular nut trees grown worldwide under arid conditions. In north eastern region of Morocco, after the olive tree the almond tree is the second most ... [more ▼]

The almond tree (Prunus dulcis) is one of the most popular nut trees grown worldwide under arid conditions. In north eastern region of Morocco, after the olive tree the almond tree is the second most important tree crop in this region, due to its resistance and capacity against water shortage and irrigation deficit. During this decade, new orchards of almond trees have emerged, thanks to the program Green Morocco, supported by the BTC (*BTC-PROFAO project). Thus 6.000 hectares of new orchards of almond trees were planted using the association Ferragnes / Ferraduel, which is a couple of French cultivars known for their late blooming. In the aim to improve the income of this rural population, cooperatives and economic interest groups were created; farmers have been trained for good almond cultivation practices as well as almond harvesting and processing. In eastern Morocco, traditionally almonds are hulled and shelled, manually by rural women, but currently, almonds processing machines are under installation. Manually or mechanically, almonds’ hulling and shelling operations generate many byproducts which are hulls (thin mesocarp, green shell cover), shells (Hardened endocarp) but also broken kernels from almonds sorting and brown skin as byproduct of almonds’ blanching. Taking in consideration the importance of valorization of almond byproduct, this work deals with the agro economical relevance and added value that could be generated by using broken almonds (as a co product) for Almond oils extraction. Thus this oral communication focuses on (i) the characterization of Almond oils produced by cooperatives in this region as an adding value to this almond’s co-products (ii) Paths of research for the valorization of the other by-products mainly almonds’ shells and hulls. Briefly, almond oils were extracted from broken almond (as a co-product) by screw press, oil yield rage between 48 and 56%. Fatty Acids (FA) profile, determined by GC-FID, shows dominance of unsaturated fatty acids fraction [USFA > 85% ] which is mainly represented by oleic Acid (61-69%) and linoleic acid (22-27% ). Saturated fatty acids fraction (SFA <11%) is represented mainly by palmitic acid (7-8%). and stearic acid (2-3%). Total phenol content range between 40-45 mg/kg-oil, however total tocopherols content is important and range between 510-530 mg/kg-oil with a large dominance of α tocopherol. The presence of these compounds is important in relation to oil stability and as nutritional quality label. Thus, consumption of almond oil is recommended thanks to their beneficial effects on health, but it’s also recommended for cosmetic uses. Keywords: Almond Tree, Almonds, almond co-products, Almond Oils. [less ▲]

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See detailScientific writing
Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege

Conference (2018, May 09)

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See detailVolatolomics
Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege

Conference (2018, May 08)

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See detailActivité antimicrobienne de l'huile essentielle de Thymus fontanesii
Sid Ali, Lamia; Brada, Moussa; Harhour, Aicha et al

Poster (2018, May 03)

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See detailPhenotyping of Brassica napus L. plantlets affected during in vitro growth by the presence of epoxiconazole
Durenne, Bastien ULiege; Blondel, Alodie; Ducat, Nathalie et al

in Acta Horticulturae (2018), 1202

Epoxiconazole like others triazole fungicides are known to be persistent in the soil. Several studies using foliar application experiments demonstrated the effect of its triazole metabolite as plant ... [more ▼]

Epoxiconazole like others triazole fungicides are known to be persistent in the soil. Several studies using foliar application experiments demonstrated the effect of its triazole metabolite as plant growth regulator through the anti-gibberellin activity. And notably, the reduction of Brassica napus L. growth can be attributed to the inhibition of gibberellin biosynthesis at the stage of conversion of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid. We describe here an in vitro experiment studying the relationship between epoxiconazole in culture medium (0 mg L⁻¹, 0.120 mg L⁻¹ and 0.200 mg L⁻¹) and the phenotyping (root and shoot growth) of three varieties of winter rapeseeds (Brassica napus L. var. Catalina, var. ES Astrid and var. Toccata). Plantlets fungicide content was quantified using the QuEChERS extraction method following by an automated UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that the shoots and roots growth of Brassica napus L. plantlets was significantly inhibited by epoxiconazole at 0.120 mg L⁻¹ independently of the variety. The concentration of 0.200 mg L⁻¹ leaded to necrosis and anthocyanosis symptoms and can be considered as lethal for in vitro growing explants. The huge epoxiconazole absorption by rapeseed plantlets clearly showed a dose-dependent relationship and was closely similar for the three varieties. [less ▲]

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See detailMeat quality traits of Béni Guil lamb raised in eastern Morocco
Belhaj, K.; Mansouri, Farid; Serghini-Caid, H. et al

Poster (2018, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULiège)