References of "FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailComparing hypnosis and virtual reality to reduce anxiety and pain before and after a cardiovascular surgery
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; Dardenne, Nadia ULiege; Bicego, Aminata Yasmina ULiege et al

Poster (2020, March)

Anxiety, pain and fatigue are important factors influencing the good recovery of patients after a surgery. Nowadays, non-pharmacological techniques such as hypnosis and virtual reality are used in ... [more ▼]

Anxiety, pain and fatigue are important factors influencing the good recovery of patients after a surgery. Nowadays, non-pharmacological techniques such as hypnosis and virtual reality are used in addition to pharmacological treatment to reduce these symptoms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (11 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan hypnosis and virtual reality reduce anxiety, pain and fatigue among patients who undergo cardiac surgery: a randomised controlled trial
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULiege; NYSSEN, Anne-Sophie ULiege et al

in Trials (2020)

Different non-pharmacological techniques, including hypnosis and virtual reality (VR) are currently used as complementary tools in the treatment of anxiety, acute and chronic pain. A new technique called ... [more ▼]

Different non-pharmacological techniques, including hypnosis and virtual reality (VR) are currently used as complementary tools in the treatment of anxiety, acute and chronic pain. A new technique called 'virtual reality hypnosis' (VRH), which encompasses a combination of both tools, is regularly used although its benefits and underlying mechanisms remain unknown to this date. With the goal to improve our understanding of VRH combination effects, it is necessary to conduct randomized and controlled research trials in order to understand their clinical interest and potential benefits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan hypnosis be used in Intensive Care Units?
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; Bicego, Aminata Yasmina ULiege; MALENGREAUX, Christophe ULiege et al

in Médecine Intensive Réanimation (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (24 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnosis for cingulate-mediated analgesia and disease treatment
Trujillo-Rodriguez, Diana ULiege; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

in Vogt, Brendt A (Ed.) Cingulate Cortex. Handbook of Clinical Neurology (3rd series) (2019)

Hypnosis is a technique that induces changes in perceptual experience through response to specific suggestions. By means of functional neuroimaging, a large body of clinical and experimental studies has ... [more ▼]

Hypnosis is a technique that induces changes in perceptual experience through response to specific suggestions. By means of functional neuroimaging, a large body of clinical and experimental studies has shown that hypnotic processes modify internal (self-awareness) as well as external (environmental awareness) brain networks. Objective quantifications of this kind permit the characterization of cerebral changes after hypnotic induction and its uses in the clinical setting. Hypnosedation is one such application, as it combines hypnosis with local anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery. The power of this technique lies in the avoidance of general anesthesia and its potential complications that emerge during and after surgery. Hypnosedation is associated with improved intraoperative comfort and reduced perioperative anxiety and pain. It ensures a faster recovery of the patient and diminishes the intraoperative requirements for sedative or analgesic drugs. Mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain perception under hypnotic conditions involve cortical and subcortical areas, mainly the anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices as well as the basal ganglia and thalami. In that respect, hypnosis-induced analgesia is an effective and highly cost-effective alternative to sedation during surgery and symptom management. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 214 (19 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurophenomenology of near-death experience memory in hypnotic recall: a within-subject EEG study
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Mensen, Armand ULiege; CHARLAND-VERVILLE, Vanessa ULiege et al

in Scientific Reports (2019)

The neurobiological basis of near-death experiences (NDEs) is unknown, but a few studies attempted to investigate it by reproducing in laboratory settings phenomenological experiences that seem to closely ... [more ▼]

The neurobiological basis of near-death experiences (NDEs) is unknown, but a few studies attempted to investigate it by reproducing in laboratory settings phenomenological experiences that seem to closely resemble NDEs. So far, no study has induced NDE-like features via hypnotic modulation while simultaneously measuring changes in brain activity using high-density EEG. Five volunteers who previously had experienced a pleasant NDE were invited to re-experience the NDE memory and another pleasant autobiographical memory (dating to the same time period), in normal consciousness and with hypnosis. We compared the hypnosis-induced subjective experience with the one of the genuine experience memory. Continuous high-density EEG was recorded throughout. At a phenomenological level, we succeeded in recreating NDE-like features without any adverse effects. Absorption and dissociation levels were reported as higher during all hypnosis conditions as compared to normal consciousness conditions, suggesting that our hypnosis-based protocol increased the felt subjective experience in the recall of both memories. The recall of a NDE phenomenology was related to an increase of alpha activity in frontal and posterior regions. This study provides a proof-of-concept methodology for studying the phenomenon, enabling to prospectively explore the NDE-like features and associated EEG changes in controlled settings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of a hypnosis-based intervention on fatigue and sleep difficulties in post-treatment cancer patients
Grégoire, Charlotte ULiege; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

in Journal of Psychosocial Oncology Research and Practice (2019, September), 1(1S),

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (24 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudy of the impact of non-pharmacological techniques (self-hypnosis/self-care) on cognitive complaints in cancer patients
Bicego, Aminata Yasmina ULiege; Grégoire, Charlotte ULiege; Cassol, Helena ULiege et al

Conference (2019, May 30)

Cancer diagnosis generates a number of physical, psychological and cognitive impairments such as memory, attentional and informational processing deficits that can undermine patients’ quality of life (QoL ... [more ▼]

Cancer diagnosis generates a number of physical, psychological and cognitive impairments such as memory, attentional and informational processing deficits that can undermine patients’ quality of life (QoL). Self-hypnosis combined to self-care learning have been used in the past years to treat these symptoms, at the moment of diagnosis, during and/or after the cancer treatments. However, the impact of self-hypnosis/self-care upon cognitive difficulties has not been investigated yet.The aim of this study is to better understand the impact of self hypnosis/self-care upon the cognitive functions by means of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function1 (FACT-COG). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 190 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of non-pharmacological approaches on the patient’s comfort after a cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial.
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; Puttaert, Ninon ULiege; LEDOUX, Didier ULiege et al

Conference (2019, May 30)

Different non-pharmacological techniques including hypnosis, music, and virtual reality (VR) are being used as complementary tools in the treatment of pain. A new technique which encompasses a combination ... [more ▼]

Different non-pharmacological techniques including hypnosis, music, and virtual reality (VR) are being used as complementary tools in the treatment of pain. A new technique which encompasses a combination of hypnosis and VR, called "virtual reality hypnosis" (VRH), should soon be used on a regular basis in clinical settings. The aim of this study is to better understand the impact of hypnosis, music, VR and VRH, and to investigate their influence on the patient’s perception of pain, anxiety and tiredness after a cardiac surgery in intensive care unit [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 197 (18 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe use of hypnosis, virtual reality and music before and after a cardiovascular surgery: A randomized controlled trial on patients’ perceptions
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; Puttaert, Ninon ULiege; LEDOUX, Didier ULiege et al

Poster (2019, May)

The aim of this preliminary study was to better understand the impact of 5 non-pharmacological techniques on the patient’s well-being before and after a cardiovascular surgery.

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA hypnosis-based group intervention to improve quality of life in children with cancer and their parents.
Grégoire, Charlotte ULiege; Chantrain, Christophe; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULiege et al

in International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (2019), 67(2), 117-135

Many children with cancer and their parents suffer from distress, fatigue, and relational difficulties. Hypnosis is often used to decrease children’s procedure-related pain and distress in paediatric ... [more ▼]

Many children with cancer and their parents suffer from distress, fatigue, and relational difficulties. Hypnosis is often used to decrease children’s procedure-related pain and distress in paediatric oncology, and to improve the well-being of adults with cancer. This paper describes a pilot study assessing the acceptability and feasibility of a group intervention combining self-care and hypnosis for children with cancer and their parents, and a quasi-experimental protocol aimed at assessing the efficacy of this intervention to improve quality of life, distress, fatigue, and coping. The pilot study showed that the intervention was feasible and perceived positively. Future research is needed to test the efficacy of group interventions combining self-care and hypnosis to improve quality of life for children with cancer and their families. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 153 (16 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeural correlates of modified subjective state of consciousness induced by hypnosis using EEG-connectivity approach
Panda, Rajanikant ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

Poster (2019, January 17)

Introduction: Hypnotic state has been shown to be of clinical utility, however its neural mechanisms still remain unclear [1]. This study investigates the neural basis of hypnosis using resting state EEG ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Hypnotic state has been shown to be of clinical utility, however its neural mechanisms still remain unclear [1]. This study investigates the neural basis of hypnosis using resting state EEG connectivity measurements. Methods: Ten healthy subjects (7 females, mean age 24±3years) underwent high density EEG recordings in both eye close awake resting state and hypnosis state. The hypnotic state instruction involved a 3-min induction procedure with muscle relaxation and eye fixation. After preprocessing EEG data, both hypothesis and data driven analysis were conducted using connectivity approach. Classical power spectral analysis was performed for delta (1-4Hz), theta (4.1-8Hz), alpha (8.1-12Hz), beta1 (12.1-20Hz) and beta2 (20.1-30Hz) frequency bands. Connectivity between every pair of electrodes was assessed using weighted Phase Lag Index. Hypothesis-based connectivity was computed for frontal, parietal and midline regions [2]. Data-driven graph theory connectivity was carried out to measure brain connectivity network properties and altered hub regions [3]. Results and Discussion: During hypnosis, increased spectral power was observed in delta and decreases were noted in the alpha and beta bands. From hypothesis based connectivity analysis, we observed an increased frontal interhemispheric connectivity in delta and left frontal to right parietal in theta band. Decreased connectivity was found both for alpha and beta bands in midline (upper central with lower central), right frontal with ‘right parietal and upper central’. Graph theory measures showed differences between hypnotic state and resting state both at the global and local level. Through integrated nodal clustering coefficient, we found increased frontoparietal connectivity in delta and theta bands and decreased bilateral frontal and parietal connectivity in alpha and beta-2 frequency bands. During hypnosis, we found increased connectivity in the lower frequency range (i.e., delta) and decreases at higher frequencies (i.e., beta) when considering frontal and parietal regions. These oscillations seems to characterise modified subjective state of consciousness induced by hypnosis, possibly reflecting states of efficient cognitive-processing and positive-emotional experiences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 163 (16 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan subjective ratings of absorption, dissociation, and time perception during “neutral hypnosis” predict hypnotizability?: An exploratory study.
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; LEDOUX, Didier ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

in International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (2019), 67(1), 28-38

Detailed reference viewed: 174 (31 ULiège)