References of "Etienne, Anne-Laure"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSUCCESSFUL MEDICAL MANAGEMENT OF A BEZOAR IN A PERUVIAN GUINEA PIG (CAVIA PORCELLUS)
Deflers, Hélène ULiege; Gandar, Frédéric ULiege; Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege et al

in Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine (2019), 29

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailParotid purulent sialocoele treated by grass seeds extirpation
Picavet, Pierre ULiege; Grauwels, Magda ULiege; Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege et al

Poster (2018, October 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailBilateral laryngeal paralysis secondary to traumatic nerve damage in two dogs
Hamon, Martin ULiege; Picavet, Pierre ULiege; Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege et al

Poster (2018, August)

Cervical traumas are common in dogs as a consequence of bite injuries, road traffic accidents, choke chains, and gunshot injuries.1 Penetrating wounds of the cervical region may be a disaster given the ... [more ▼]

Cervical traumas are common in dogs as a consequence of bite injuries, road traffic accidents, choke chains, and gunshot injuries.1 Penetrating wounds of the cervical region may be a disaster given the number of vital structures present in the area. Laryngeal paralysis is the inability to abduct the arytenoid cartilages. Traumatic damage to the vagus or recurrent laryngeal nerve is identified as a possible cause of acquired laryngeal paralysis.2 However, its occurrence remains rare. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (14 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrethral intussusception following traumatic catheterization in a male cat
Broux, Olivier ULiege; Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege; Hamaide, Annick ULiege

in Canadian Veterinary Journal (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (31 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThymic haemorrhage due to ingestion of human anticoagulant medication in a puppy
Vangrinsven, Emilie ULiege; Girod, Maud; Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege et al

in Veterinary Record Case Reports (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailTravaux Paracliniques d'Imagerie médicale en Master Bloc 2 en 2017...
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege; Busoni, Valeria ULiege

Conference (2017, February 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrevalence, location and concurrent diseases of ultrasonographic cyst-like lesions of abdominal lymph nodes in dogs.
Liotta, Annalisa Pia; Billen, Frédéric ULiege; Heimann, Marianne et al

in Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2017)

Lymph nodal cyst-like lesions are occasionally identified during abdominal ultrasound in dogs. However, a study evaluating their prevalence and clinical significance is lacking. The aim of this ... [more ▼]

Lymph nodal cyst-like lesions are occasionally identified during abdominal ultrasound in dogs. However, a study evaluating their prevalence and clinical significance is lacking. The aim of this observational cross-sectional study was to evaluate prevalence, most common location and concurrent diseases of cyst-like lymph nodes detected during abdominal ultrasound. Affected lymph nodes, patient signalment and concurrent diseases of dogs with cyst-like lymph nodal lesions having undergone abdominal ultrasound over a one-year period were recorded. Twenty-three affected lymph nodes were observed in 17/553 dogs (prevalence=3 per cent). The most commonly affected was the lumbar lymphocenter (7/23), followed by the coeliac (6/23), the cranial mesenteric (5/23) and the iliosacral (5/23). Twenty-three concurrent diseases were diagnosed in 17 dogs, among which 16/23 were non-neoplastic (70 per cent). The most common concurrent disease was renal insufficiency (8/23), followed by neoplasia (7/23), gastroenteropathy (3/23), benign prostatic disease (2/23), pancreatitis (1/23), peritonitis (1/23) and neurological disease (1/23). No statistical correlation existed between cyst-like lymph nodal lesion and a specific neoplastic or non-neoplastic disease. In conclusion, in the present study, cyst-like lymph nodal lesions have a low prevalence, involve different lymphocenters and were found in dogs affected by different diseases, including both non-neoplastic and neoplastic aetiologies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (7 ULiège)
See detailUltrasound-guided bladder biopsy: technique description in 13 dogs
Soliveres, Eugénie; Shimizu, Naomi ULiege; Hamaide, Annick ULiege et al

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUltrasound-guided bladder biopsy: technique description in 13 dogs
Soliveres, Eugénie ULiege; Shimizu, Naomi ULiege; Hamaide, Annick ULiege et al

in Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound (2017), 58(6), 707

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (16 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTEACHING VETERINARY RADIOLOGY: DOES COMPARISON HELP?
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege; Delguste, Catherine ULiege; Busoni, Valeria ULiege

Poster (2016, September 01)

Introduction/Purpose Comparison learning is an approach for learning complex visual tasks. As described in human medicine, by comparing radiographs with pathology and without pathology, veterinary ... [more ▼]

Introduction/Purpose Comparison learning is an approach for learning complex visual tasks. As described in human medicine, by comparing radiographs with pathology and without pathology, veterinary students could learn to discriminate relevant disease-related information to recognize the disease. We hypothesized that exposure to a training by side-by-side comparison of normal to abnormal radiographs would lead to higher visual diagnostic accuracy and possibly to a higher ability to describe the features of a known disease on canine thoracic radiographs. Material and methods Twenty veterinary students were randomly assigned to either a group that compared radiographs showing thoracic disease with normal images (group 1) or to a group that only studied abnormal radiographs (group 2). All students had their theoretical radiology teaching and 13 of them had also received the practical teaching of the study curriculum, evenly distributed between the 2 groups. Twenty-nine radiographs of small animal thorax were used. The procedure consisted in three experimenter-supervised phases: 1. training, 2. visual recognition test, 3. feature description test. In the training phase, each screen showed two radiographs with the name of the disease present in each. In the group 1 (pathology/normal condition), a radiograph of a patient and a normal image were shown next to each other. In the group 2 (pathology/pathology condition), two radiographs of patients with the same disease were shown next to each other. The 9 screens were presented twice, with the diseases in a different order for the first and second runs. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the success rates of groups of students. Results On visual recognition test, there was no statistical difference in visual diagnostic accuracy between groups. When students gave the wrong answer, they often diagnosed the item as another disease of similar distribution (diffuse or focal). Students who received the practical teaching and students of group 1 had a higher accuracy for normal thoracic radiographs. On feature description test, no significant effect of comparison learning was found, but focal diseases were better described than diffuse diseases with a significant difference between these. Discussion/Conclusions Results show that comparison with normal images did not help in recognizing or describing thoracic pathologies but helps to recognize normal images. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailCONTRIBUTION A L’ETUDE DE L’ECHOGRAPHIE INTERVENTIONNELLE DU RACHIS CHEZ LE CHIEN : MISE AU POINT DE TECHNIQUES ECHOGUIDEES POUR LES PONCTIONS SOUS-ARACHNOÏDIENNES ET ANALYSE DE LEUR APPLICATION
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2016)

SUMMARY Percutaneous ultrasound guidance has become a routine procedure in veterinary medicine in domestic animals. It allows precise placement of the needle in the desired target. Punctures of the ... [more ▼]

SUMMARY Percutaneous ultrasound guidance has become a routine procedure in veterinary medicine in domestic animals. It allows precise placement of the needle in the desired target. Punctures of the subarachnoid space in dogs are frequently carried out in veterinary practice for diagnostic purposes. In these procedures, the placement of the needle into the subarachnoid space (atlanto-occipital or lumbar) is commonly performed blindly by feeling the bony anatomical landmarks but this can be laborious or even impossible in some patients as reported in human medicine. The topic of this study is ultrasound guidance for the placement of the needle during puncture of the subarachnoid space. The needle placement can be done under ultrasound guidance according to two methods. The "indirect guidance" is a method of deferred ultrasound guidance. The "direct guidance" is a real time procedure in which the operator holds the needle in one hand and the ultrasound probe in the other. It allows direct visualization of the needle (if direct guidance), the target structure, adjacent tissues (including vascular structures) and potential injectate while minimizing the risk of complications. Punctures of the subarachnoid space are carried out by placing the needle in the cisterna magna or in the caudal lumbar subarachnoid space (between the fifth and sixth lumbar vertebrae). The cisternal puncture is most frequently used in practice but presents greater risk of iatrogenic lesions of the brain stem. The lumbar puncture is technically more difficult and is frequently contaminated by iatrogenic blood. Cerebrospinal fluid punctures have several clinical applications. They allow to collect cerebrospinal fluid for diagnostic testing, to realize myelograms or myeloscanners by injecting contrast medium and to perform spinal anesthesia or analgesia by injecting one or more substance(s) blocking the conduction of the spinal nerves. Subarachnoid lumbar puncture is used commonly in the dog for cerebrospinal fluid collection and/or myelography. Percutaneous ultrasound anatomy of the lumbar region in the dog and a technique for ultrasound-guided lumbar puncture were described in the first study. Ultrasound images obtained ex- vivo and in-vivo were compared with anatomic sections and used to identify the landmarks for ultrasound-guided lumbar puncture. The ultrasound-guided procedure was established on cadavers and then applied in-vivo on eight dogs. The anatomic landmarks for the ultrasound-guided puncture, which should be identified using the parasagittal oblique ultrasound image, were the articular processes of the fifth and sixth lumbar vertebrae and the interarcuate space. The spinal needle was directed under direct ultrasound-guidance toward the triangular space located between the contiguous articular processes of the fifth and sixth lumbar vertebrae and then advanced to enter the vertebral canal. Using these precise ultrasound anatomic landmarks, an ultrasound-guided technique for lumbar puncture is applicable to dogs. Cisternal puncture in dogs and cats is commonly carried out. Percutaneous ultrasound anatomy of the cisternal region in the dog and the cat and an indirect technique for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture were described in the second study. Ultrasound images obtained ex-vivo and in-vivo were compared with anatomic sections and used to identify the landmarks for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. The ultrasound-guided procedure was established in cadavers and then applied in- vivo in seven dogs and two cats. The anatomic landmarks for the ultrasound-guided puncture were the cisterna magna, the spinal cord, the two occipital condyles on transverse images, the external occipital crest and the dorsal arch of the first cervical vertebra on longitudinal images. Using these ultrasound anatomic landmarks, an indirect ultrasound-guided technique for cisternal puncture is applicable to dogs and cats. The standard technique for placing a needle into the canine lumbar subarachnoid space is primarily based on the palpation of anatomic landmarks and the use of probing movements of the needle. However, this technique can be challenging for novice operators. The aim of the third observational, prospective, ex vivo, feasibility study was to compare ultrasound-guided versus standard anatomic landmark approaches for novices performing needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space using dog cadavers. Eight experienced operators validated the canine cadaver model as usable for training landmark and ultrasound-guided needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space based on realistic anatomy and tissue consistency. With informed consent, 67 final year veterinary students were prospectively enrolled in the study. Students had no prior experience in needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space nor use of ultrasound. Each student received a short theoretical training about each technique before the trial and then attempted blind landmark-guided and ultrasound-guided techniques on randomized canine cadavers. After having performed both procedures, the operators completed a self-evaluation questionnaire about their performance and self-confidence. Total success rates for students were 48% and 77% for the landmark- and ultrasound-guided technique, respectively. Ultrasound guidance significantly increased total success rate when compared to the landmark-guided technique and significantly reduced the number of attempts. With ultrasound guidance self-confidence was improved, without bringing any significant change in duration of the needle placement procedure. Findings indicated that the use of ultrasound guidance and cadavers is a feasible method for training novice operators in needle placement into the canine lumbar subarachnoid space after short theoretical training. Ultrasound-guided techniques for needle placement in the cisterna magna and in the lumbar subarachnoid space were described in the dog. The aim of the fourth observational, prospective, ex-vivo study was to compare the impact of ultrasound guidance for the cisternal versus lumbar needle placement using dog cadavers. With informed consent, 83 operators were prospectively enrolled in the study. They were divided in four groups depending on experience. Each operator received a short theoretical training about each technique before the trial and then attempted a cisternal and lumbar punctures with blind landmark-guided and ultrasound-guided techniques on randomized canine cadavers. The lumbar ultrasound-guidance was direct while the cisternal ultrasound-guidance was indirect. After having performed each procedure, the operators completed a self-evaluation questionnaire about their previous experience, their performance and their self-confidence. The ultrasound guidance significantly increased total success rate in both areas compared with the blind technique but more significantly in the lumbar region. The cisternal ultrasound guidance significantly improved the number of attempts, the time needed to perform the procedure and the self-confidence in inexperienced and experienced operators. The lumbar ultrasound guidance significantly increased the self-confidence in inexperienced and experienced operators and significantly decreased the number of attempts in inexperienced operators. The first cause of failure cited was different according to the location of the puncture and was related to the nature of ultrasound guidance. Findings indicated that the use of ultrasound guidance by novice and experienced operators improved different parameters according to the location of the needle placement. This study demonstrated that inexperienced operators are able to use ultrasound guidance after a short theoretical teaching session in an ex-vivo context and this supports the use of ultrasound-guidance for learning and teaching purposes. The study of the impact of ultrasound guidance for needle placement procedures described in this work could be developed and studied for other technically difficult or risky procedures on dogs. If the benefits of ultrasound guidance demonstrated ex-vivo in this work are transferable to the clinical conditions, punctures of the subarachnoid injections would be less « scary » for novice operators and become routine procedures applicable by a large numbers of veterinarians. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCOMPARISON OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED VS. STANDARD LANDMARK TECHNIQUES FOR TRAINING NOVICE OPERATORS IN PLACING NEEDLES INTO THE LUMBAR SUBARACHNOID SPACE OF CANINE CADAVERS
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege; Delguste, Catherine ULiege; Busoni, Valeria ULiege

in Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound (2016)

The standard technique for placing a needle into the canine lumbar subarachnoid space is primarily based on palpation of anatomic landmarks and use of probing movements of the needle, however, this ... [more ▼]

The standard technique for placing a needle into the canine lumbar subarachnoid space is primarily based on palpation of anatomic landmarks and use of probing movements of the needle, however, this technique can be challenging for novice operators. The aim of the current observational, prospective, ex vivo, feasibility study was to compare ultrasound-guided vs. standard anatomic landmark approaches for novices performing needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space using dog cadavers. Eight experienced operators validated the canine cadaver model as usable for training landmark and ultrasound-guided needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space based on realistic anatomy and tissue consistency. With informed consent, 67 final year veterinary students were prospectively enrolled in the study. Students had no prior experience in needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space or use of ultrasound. Each student received a short theoretical training about each technique before the trial and then attempted blind landmark-guided and ultrasound-guided techniques on randomized canine cadavers. After having performed both procedures, the operators completed a self-evaluation questionnaire about their performance and self-confidence. Total success rates for students were 48% and 77% for the landmark- and ultrasound-guided techniques, respectively. Ultrasound guidance significantly increased total success rate when compared to the landmark-guided technique and significantly reduced the number of attempts. With ultrasound guidance self-confidence was improved, without bringing any significant change in duration of the needle placement procedure. Findings indicated that use of ultrasound guidance and cadavers are feasible methods for training novice operators in needle placement into the canine lumbar subarachnoid space. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPulmonary Vein-to-Pulmonary Artery Ratio is an Echocardiographic Index of Congestive Heart Failure in Dogs with Degenerative Mitral Valve Disease
Merveille, Anne-Christine ULiege; Bolen, Géraldine ULiege; Krafft, Emilie et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2015), 29

Background Early recognition of left-sided congestive heart failure (CHF) in dogs with degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD) is important because it influences medical therapy, timing of follow-up, and ... [more ▼]

Background Early recognition of left-sided congestive heart failure (CHF) in dogs with degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD) is important because it influences medical therapy, timing of follow-up, and outcome.HypothesisPulmonary vein diameter-to-pulmonary artery diameter ratio (PV/PA) measured by echocardiography can predict CHF.AnimalsNinety-eight client-owned dogs, 37 controls, and 61 dogs with DMVD.Methods Prospective clinical cohort study. History, physical examination and Doppler-echocardiography were performed. Dogs were classified as International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council class I, II or III. Congestive heart failure was identified in a subset of 56 dogs based on radiographic findings. The PV/PA was measured in bidimensional (2D) and M-mode by 2 investigators blinded to the radiologists’ conclusions.ResultsInterobserver coefficients of variation for PV/PA acquisition and measurement were <10%. The PV/PA in control dogs was approximately 1 and increased with class of heart failure. The presence of CHF could be best predicted by measuring PV/PA in 2D echocardiography (cut-off, 1.7; area under the curve, 0.98; CI, 0.97–0.98; P < .001) with a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 91%.Conclusion and clinical importanceThe PV/PA is a simple and reproducible echocardiographic variable that increases with class of heart failure and may help discriminate dogs in CHF from asymptomatic dogs with DMVD. Additional studies are required to determine whether PV/PA might provide additional information in the integrated interpretation of Doppler-echocardiographic indices of left ventricular filling pressures and could be used for rapid assessment of CHF in dogs in a critical care setting. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComparaison de l’effet du guidage échographique sur les ponctions de liquide céphalo-rachidien entre les localisations cisternales et lombaires chez le chien : une étude ex vivo
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULiege; Peeters, Dominique ULiege; Busoni, Valeria ULiege

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2015), 158

RÉSUMÉ : Le placement échoguidé de l’aiguille spinale pour les ponctions cisternale et lombaire chez le chien a été décrit. L’objectif de ce travail était de comparer l’effet du guidage échographique pour ... [more ▼]

RÉSUMÉ : Le placement échoguidé de l’aiguille spinale pour les ponctions cisternale et lombaire chez le chien a été décrit. L’objectif de ce travail était de comparer l’effet du guidage échographique pour la ponction de liquide céphalo-rachidien entre les ponctions cisternale et lombaire. Quatre-vingt-trois opérateurs ont participé à l’étude. Ils étaient divisés en quatre groupes selon leur expérience. Après une formation théorique courte, chaque opérateur a réalisé une ponction cisternale et lombaire en aveugle et sous contrôle échographique sur des cadavres tirés au sort. L’échoguidage lombaire était direct alors que celui cisternal était indirect. Après chaque procédure, les opérateurs ont rempli un questionnaire sur leur expérience, leur performance et leur confiance en soi. L’échoguidage augmentait significativement le taux de réussite global de la ponction (comparée à la méthode en aveugle) mais plus clairement avec la localisation lombaire. Le guidage échographique cisternal améliorait significativement le nombre de tentatives, le temps et la confiance en soi chez les opérateurs inexpérimentés et expérimentés. La première cause d’échec citée était différente selon la localisation de la ponction et était liée à la nature de l’échoguidage. Cette étude démontre que les opérateurs inexpérimentés sont capables de réaliser des ponctions échoguidées après une formation théorique courte, justifiant l’utilité du guidage échographique à des fins pédagogiques. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (5 ULiège)