References of "Dieckmann, G"
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See detailAn active bacterial community linked to high chl-a concentrations in Antarctic winter-pack ice and evidence for the development of an anaerobic sea-ice bacterial community
Eronen-Rasimus; Luhtanen, A.-M.; Rintala, J.-M. et al

Poster (2017, September)

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See detailBiogeochemical Impact of Snow Cover and Cyclonic Intrusions on the Winter Weddell Sea Ice Pack
Tison, J.-L.; Schwegmann, S.; Dieckmann, G. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Oceans (2017), 122(12), 9548--9571

Sea ice is a dynamic biogeochemical reactor and a double interface actively interacting with both the atmosphere and the ocean. However, proper understanding of its annual impact on exchanges, and ... [more ▼]

Sea ice is a dynamic biogeochemical reactor and a double interface actively interacting with both the atmosphere and the ocean. However, proper understanding of its annual impact on exchanges, and therefore potentially on the climate, notably suffer from the paucity of autumnal and winter data sets. Here we present the results of physical and biogeochemical investigations on winter Antarctic pack ice in the Weddell Sea (R. V. Polarstern AWECS cruise, June–August 2013) which are compared with those from two similar studies conducted in the area in 1986 and 1992. The winter 2013 was characterized by a warm sea ice cover due to the combined effects of deep snow and frequent warm cyclones events penetrating southward from the open Southern Ocean. These conditions were favorable to high ice permeability and cyclic events of brine movements within the sea ice cover (brine tubes), favoring relatively high chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentrations. We discuss the timing of this algal activity showing that arguments can be presented in favor of continued activity during the winter due to the specific physical conditions. Large-scale sea ice model simulations also suggest a context of increasingly deep snow, warm ice, and large brine fractions across the three observational years, despite the fact that the model is forced with a snowfall climatology. This lends support to the claim that more severe Antarctic sea ice conditions, characterized by a longer ice season, thicker, and more concentrated ice are sufficient to increase the snow depth and, somehow counterintuitively, to warm the ice. [less ▲]

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See detailPhage-host systems isolated from sea ice
Luhtanen, A.-M.; Rintala, J.-M.; Oksanen, H. et al

Poster (2016, August)

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See detailWintertime bacterial communities in changing Antarctic sea ice
Eronen-Rasimus, E.; Luhtanen, A.-M.; Delille, Bruno ULiege et al

Poster (2016, August)

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See detailThe impact of dissolved organic carbon and bacterial respiration on pCO2 in experimental sea ice
Zhou, Jiayun; Kotovitch, Marie ULiege; Kaartokallio, H. et al

in Progress in Oceanography (2016), 141

Previous observations have shown that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in sea ice brines is generally higher in Arctic sea ice compared to those from the Antarctic sea ice, especially in ... [more ▼]

Previous observations have shown that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in sea ice brines is generally higher in Arctic sea ice compared to those from the Antarctic sea ice, especially in winter and early spring. We hypothesized that these differences result from the higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content in Arctic seawater: Higher concentrations of DOC in seawater would be reflected in a greater DOC incorporation into sea ice, enhancing bacterial respiration, which in turn would increase the pCO2 in the ice. To verify this hypothesis, we performed an experiment using two series of mesocosms: one was filled with seawater (SW) and the other one with seawater with an addition of filtered humic-rich river water (SWR). The addition of river water increased the DOC concentration of the water from a median of 142 µmol L-1 in SW to 249 µmol L-1 in SWR. Sea ice was grown in these mesocosms under the same physical conditions over 19 days. Microalgae and protists were absent, and only bacterial activity has been detected. We measured the DOC concentration, bacterial respiration, total alkalinity and pCO2 in sea ice and the underlying seawater, and we calculated the changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in both media. We found that bacterial respiration in ice was higher in SWR: median bacterial respiration was 25 nmol C L-1 h-1 compared to 10 nmol C L-1 h-1 in SW. pCO2 in ice was also higher in SWR with a median of 430 ppm compared to 356 ppm in SW. However, the differences in pCO2 were larger within the ice interiors than at the surfaces or the bottom layers of the ice, where exchanges at the air-ice and ice-water interfaces might have reduced the differences. In addition, we used a model to simulate the differences of pCO2 and DIC based on bacterial respiration. The model simulations support the experimental findings and further suggest that bacterial growth efficiency in the ice might be 0.15-0.2. It is thus credible that the higher pCO2 in Arctic sea ice brines compared with those from the Antarctic sea ice were due to an elevated bacterial respiration, sustained by higher riverine DOC loads. These conclusions should hold for locations and time frames when bacterial activity is relatively dominant compared to algal activity, considering our experimental conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailDetermination of air‐sea ice transfer coefficient for CO2: Significant contribution of gas bubble transport during sea ice growth
Kotovitch, Marie ULiege; Moreau, S.; Zhou, Jiayun et al

Poster (2015, September)

Air‐ice CO2 fluxes were measured continuously from the freezing of a young sea‐ice cover until its decay. Cooling seawater was as a sink for atmospheric CO2 but asthe ice crystalsformed,sea ice shifted to ... [more ▼]

Air‐ice CO2 fluxes were measured continuously from the freezing of a young sea‐ice cover until its decay. Cooling seawater was as a sink for atmospheric CO2 but asthe ice crystalsformed,sea ice shifted to a source releasing CO2 to the atmosphere throughout the whole ice growth. Atmospheric warming initiated the decay, re‐shifting sea‐ice to a CO2 sink. Combining these CO2 fluxes with the partial pressure of CO2 within sea ice, we determined gas transfer coefficients for CO2 at air‐ice interface for growth and decay. We hypothesize that this difference originates from the transport of gas bubbles during ice growth, while only diffusion occurs during ice melt. In parallel, we used a 1D biogeochemical model to mimic the observed CO2 fluxes. The formation of gas bubbles was crucial to reproduce fluxes during ice growth where gas bubbles may account for up to 92 % of the upward CO2 fluxes. [less ▲]

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See detailMid-winter surveys for sea ice biogeochemistry in bi-polar oceans
Nomura, D.; Delille, Bruno ULiege; Dieckmann, G. et al

Conference (2015, August)

Sea ice has rarely been considered in estimates of global biogeochemical cycles, especially gas exchanges, because of the assumption that, in ice-covered seas, sea-ice acts as a barrier for ... [more ▼]

Sea ice has rarely been considered in estimates of global biogeochemical cycles, especially gas exchanges, because of the assumption that, in ice-covered seas, sea-ice acts as a barrier for atmosphere–ocean exchange. However, recent work has shown that sea ice and its snow cover play an active role in the exchange of gases between the ocean and atmosphere [1] [2]. Our results provide a useful reference for future studies as the ongoing drastic changes in polar climate and sea ice extent are likely to alter the biogeochemical cycles in polar ocean–sea ice–atmosphere system. However,, the lack of information for the winter-time sea ice biogeochemistry was pointed out, due to the difficulty to acquire data under harsh weather conditions. In this presentation, we will present our recent winter-time sea ice surveys of sea ice biogeochemistry on the R/V Aurora Australis off East Antarctica (SIPEX-II) in 2012 and the midwinter sea ice cruise on the R/V Polarstern in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica (AWECS) in 2013. In addition, we will also show the ongoing project of Norwegian Young sea ICE cruise (NICE2015) on the R/V Lance drifting for half a year in Arctic sea ice north of Svalbard in 2015. [1] Nomura et al. (2013) J. Geophys. Res. Oceans 118, 6511- 6524. [2] Delille et al. (2014) J. Geophys. Res. Oceans 119, 6340-6355. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotosynthesis-irradiance response curves revealed active sympagic communities in the Weddell Sea Winter, 2013
Rintala, J.-M.; Luhtanen, A.-M.; Enberg, S. et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailBlue sky and green bugs – How physical parameters and algal speciation influence DMSP and DMS profiles in Antarctic winter sea ice
Uhlig, C.; Rintala, J.-M.; Tison, J.-L. et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailIsolation of cultivable viruses from Antarctic wintertime sea ice
Luhtanen, A.-M.; Bamford, D.; De Jong, J. et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailSnow cover and short-term synoptic events drive biogeochemical dynamics in winter Weddell Sea pack ice (AWECS cruise - June to August 2013)
Tison, J.-L.; Delille, Bruno ULiege; Dieckmann, G. et al

Conference (2014, March)

This paper presents the preliminary results of an integrated multidisciplinary study of pack ice biogeochemistry in the Weddell Sea during the winter 2013 (June-August). The sea ice biogeochemistry group ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the preliminary results of an integrated multidisciplinary study of pack ice biogeochemistry in the Weddell Sea during the winter 2013 (June-August). The sea ice biogeochemistry group was one of the components of the AWECS (Antarctic Winter Ecosystem and Climate Study) cruise (Polarstern ANTXXIX-6). A total of 12 stations were carried out by the sea ice biogeochemistry group, which collected a suite of variables in the fields of physics, inorganic chemistry, gas content and composition, microbiology, biogeochemistry, trace metals and the carbonate system in order to give the best possible description of the sea ice cover and its interactions at interfaces. Samples were collected in the atmosphere above (gas fluxes), in the snow cover, in the bulk ice (ice cores), in the brines (sackholes) and in the sea water below (0m, 1m, 30 m). Here we present the results of basic physico-chemical (T°, bulk ice salinity, brine volumes, brine salinity, Rayleigh numbers) and biological (Chla) measurements in order to give an overview of the general status of the Weddell Sea winter pack ice encountered, and discuss how it controls climate relevant biogeochemical processes. Our results from the first set of 9 stations, mainly sampled along the Greenwich meridian and the easternmost part of the Weddell Sea definitively refute the view of a biogeochemically “frozen” sea ice during the Winter. This has already been demonstrated for the Spring and Summer, but we now see that sea ice sustains considerable biological stocks and activities throughout the Winter, despite the reduced amount of available PAR radiation. Accretion of the snow cover appears to play an essential role in driving biogeochemical activity, through warming from insulation, thus favouring brine transport, be it through potential convection, surface brine migration (brine tubes) or flooding. This results in a “widening” of the internal autumn layer (quite frequent in this rafting-dominated sea ice cover) and increase of the chla burden with age. Results from the second set of 3 stations in the western branch of the Weddell Sea gyre confirm that it comprises a mixture of older fast/second year ice floes with younger first-year ice floes. The older ice had the highest Chla concentrations of the entire cruise (>200 mgl-1), in an internal community enclosed within desalinized impermeable upper and lower layers. The first-year ice differs from that in the eastern Weddell Sea as it is dominated by columnar ice and (weak) algal communities are only found on the bottom or near the surface (no internal maximum). [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigating iron and organic matter incorporation in growing sea ice
Janssens, J.; Delille, Bruno ULiege; de Jong et al

Conference (2014, March)

High concentration of exopolysacharides (EPS) and iron have been found in sea ice surrounding the Antarctic continent. However, the mechanisms leading to that enrichment remain unclear. Scavenging of iron ... [more ▼]

High concentration of exopolysacharides (EPS) and iron have been found in sea ice surrounding the Antarctic continent. However, the mechanisms leading to that enrichment remain unclear. Scavenging of iron by organic matter in seawater and entrainment during sea ice formation are thought to be responsible for the accumulation of iron in sea ice. EPS could also play a role in the iron passive chelative scavenging process in sea ice and in the increase of iron bioavailability. Our study investigates the processes responsible for the accumulation of iron (dissolved, particulate and total dissolvable iron), EPS, dissolved and particulate organic matter, macro-nutrients (silicic acid, nitrate and nitrite, phosphoric acid and ammonium), chlorophyll a and sea ice algae in young sea ice during an Australian-lead spring voyage off East Antarctica (SIPEX II September – November 2012) and a German-lead winter voyage to the Weddell Sea (AWECS June – August 2013). We used a combination of field- (“in situ”) and laboratory- based sea ice growth time-series experiments. In addition different types of newly formed sea ice as pancake ice, grey ice, frost flowers and slush were collected during both voyages as a means to compare and validate the experimental data. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the biogeochemical properties of newly formed Antarctic pack ice samples in the winter. Ice temperature, salinity and textures are also presented to support the biogeochemical observations at the onset of sea ice formation. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors driving pCO2 dynamics in sea ice during a large-scale ice tank experiment
Zhou, Jiayun ULiege; Delille, Bruno ULiege; Tison, J.-L. et al

Conference (2014, March)

According to previous studies, pCO2 fluxes measured over Arctic sea ice are higher than those measured over Antarctic sea ice. We hypothesized that this was due to enhanced respiration in Arctic sea ice ... [more ▼]

According to previous studies, pCO2 fluxes measured over Arctic sea ice are higher than those measured over Antarctic sea ice. We hypothesized that this was due to enhanced respiration in Arctic sea ice, as a consequence of higher riverine inputs of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into Arctic seawater. We tested this hypothesis during the Interice V experiment at the HSVA (Hamburg) environmental test basin facility. We reproduced the growth and decay cycle of sea ice in replicate mesocosms (1 m3) filled with North Sea water (NSW series), and compared these with another series of mesocosms to which humic-rich river water had been added (10%) to increase the DOC concentration (R series). Primary producers were excluded from the experiment. The evolution of the temperature, salinity, DOC, pCO2 and bacterial biomass and production were measured in ice sampled at regular intervals throughout the experiment, as well as in the under-ice water. In addition, ice-air pCO2 fluxes were continuously monitored over both NSW and R mesocosms. pCO2 values in ice were higher in the R ice than in the NSW ice. This is attributed to the DOC content and bacterial respiration, rather than to the ice physical properties (i.e., ice permeability constrained by the ice temperature and salinity). Indeed, R ice had higher DOC content and bacterial production than the NSW ice while both showed similar physical properties. The evolution of the ice-air pCO2 fluxes was consistent with the evolution of pCO2 in ice. The fluxes were, as expected, positive (from sea ice to the atmosphere) during ice growth and negative (from the atmosphere to the ice) during ice melt. [less ▲]

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See detailDimethyl sulfide and dimethylsulfoniopropionate profiles in sea ice during winter in the Weddell Sea
Uhlig, C.; Tison, J.-L.; Rintala, J. et al

Conference (2014, March)

This study presents profiles of the organic sulphur components dimethylsulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in sea ice cores collected during the AWECS (Antarctic Winter Ecosytem Climate ... [more ▼]

This study presents profiles of the organic sulphur components dimethylsulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in sea ice cores collected during the AWECS (Antarctic Winter Ecosytem Climate Study) cruise on RV Polarstern (ANT29-6) in the Weddell Sea. DMS is a semi-volatile sulfur component and under discussion to be climate active, as its oxidation products might act as cloud condensation nuclei - thus cooling the atmosphere. It is produced by enzymatic cleavage of the precursor DMSP, which is synthesized by various types of phytoplankton and serves for example as compatible solute and cryoprotectant. Due to the physico-chemical conditions given, i.e. the high salinity and the icy matrix, sea ice as habitat favors production of high levels of DMSP by the inhabiting microalgae. DMSP and DMS are frequently found in high concentrations in sea ice during spring and summer. The aim of this study was to investigate DMS(P) levels in winter sea ice as data for the winter season is yet scarce, but is of importance for global budgeting. Preliminary results of our study show that DMS(P) production in sea ice in the Weddell Sea is also significant during winter. This stands in contrast to previous measurements in Arctic winter sea ice (CFL-IPY cruise in the Circumpolar Flaw Lead Polynya), where DMS(P) concentrations were very low. Possible explanations for the differences between DMS(P) levels in the Arctic and Antarctic might be the different snow cover and thus insulation, light regimes and also microbial community structure within the ice. DMS(P) levels were generally correlated with chlorophyll a concentrations, although the details are complex and seem to be influenced by species composition and species specific DMSP/Chla ratios. The DMS profiles mirrored the permeability of the sea ice following DMSP in the impermeable areas while showing losses to the ice surface and ice-water interface in the more permeable regions. Winter DMS(P) profiles are furthermore compared to data collected during the following spring cruise of RV Polarstern (ANT29-7) in the Weddell Sea. [less ▲]

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See detailSouthern Ocean CO2 sink: The contribution of the sea ice
Delille, Bruno ULiege; Vancoppenolle, M; Geilfus, N.-X. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Oceans (2014), 119

We report first direct measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) within Antarctic pack sea ice brines and related CO2 fluxes across the air-ice interface. From late winter to summer, brines ... [more ▼]

We report first direct measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) within Antarctic pack sea ice brines and related CO2 fluxes across the air-ice interface. From late winter to summer, brines encased in the ice change from a CO2 large over-saturation, relative to the atmosphere, to a marked under-saturation while the underlying oceanic waters remains slightly oversaturated. The decrease from winter to summer of pCO2 in the brines is driven by dilution with melting ice, dissolution of carbonate minerals crystals and net primary production. As the ice warms, its permeability increases, allowing CO2 transfer at the air-sea ice interface. The sea ice changes from a transient source to a sink for atmospheric CO2. We upscale these observations to the whole Antarctic sea-icesea ice cover using the NEMO-LIM3 large-scale sea ice-ocean, and provide first estimates of spring and summer CO2 uptake from the atmosphere by Antarctic sea ice. Over the spring-summer period, the Antarctic sea-icesea ice cover is a net sink of atmospheric CO2 of 0.029 PgC, about 58% of the estimated annual uptake from the Southern Ocean. Sea ice then contributes significantly to the sink of CO2 of the Southern Ocean. [less ▲]

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See detailOceanic CO2 sink : the contribution of the marine cryosphere
Delille, Bruno ULiege; Vancoppenolle, M.; Tilbrook, B. et al

Conference (2009, September)

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