References of "Detry, Benoit"
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See detailInflammation-Generated Extracellular Matrix Fragments Drive Lung Metastasis
BEKAERT, Sandrine ULiege; Fillet, Marianne ULiege; Detry, Benoit et al

in Cancer Growth and Metastasis (2017), 10

Mechanisms explaining the propensity of a primary tumor to metastasize to a specific site still need to be unveiled, and clinical studies support a link between chronic inflammation and cancer ... [more ▼]

Mechanisms explaining the propensity of a primary tumor to metastasize to a specific site still need to be unveiled, and clinical studies support a link between chronic inflammation and cancer dissemination to specific tissues. Using different mouse models, we demonstrate the role of inflammation-generated extracellular matrix fragments ac-PGP (N-acetyl-proline-glycine-proline) on tumor cells dissemination to lung parenchyma. In mice exposed to cigarette smoke or lipopolysaccharide, lung neutrophilic inflammation produces increased levels of MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase 9) that contributes to collagen breakdown and allows the release of ac-PGP tripeptides. By silencing CXCR2 gene expression in tumor cells, we show that these generated ac-PGP tripeptides exert a chemotactic activity on tumor cells in vivo by binding CXCR2. [less ▲]

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See detailMesenchymal stem cells shed amphiregulin at the surface of lung carcinoma cells in a juxtacrine manner .
Carnet, Oriane ULiege; Lecomte, Julie ULiege; Masset, Anne et al

in Neoplasia (2015), 17(7), 552-63

Solid tumors comprise cancer cells and different supportive stromal cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have recently been shown to enhance tumor growth and metastasis. We provide new ... [more ▼]

Solid tumors comprise cancer cells and different supportive stromal cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have recently been shown to enhance tumor growth and metastasis. We provide new mechanistic insights into how bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs co-injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells promote tumor growth and metastasis in mice. The proinvasive effect of BM-MSCs exerted on tumor cells relies on an unprecedented juxtacrine action of BM-MSC, leading to the trans-shedding of amphiregulin (AREG) from the tumor cell membrane by tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme carried by the BM-MSC plasma membrane. The released soluble AREG activates cancer cells and promotes their invasiveness. This novel concept is supported by the exploitation of different 2D and 3D culture systems and by pharmacological approaches using a tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme inhibitor and AREG-blocking antibodies. Altogether, we here assign a new function to BM-MSC in tumor progression and establish an uncovered link between AREG and BM-MSC. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of exercise and training on oxygen transport in healthy standardbred horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Cambier, Carole ULiege; de Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2007), 21

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See detailCalculation of bovine haemoglobin oxygen saturation by algorithms integrating age, haemoglobin content, blood pH, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, and temperature.
Detry, Benoit; Cambier, Carole ULiege; Frans, A. et al

in Veterinary Journal (2003), 165(3), 258-265

In human and veterinary medicine, arterial and venous haemoglobin oxygen saturations are often used to estimate the severity of a disease and to guide therapeutic decisions. In veterinary medicine ... [more ▼]

In human and veterinary medicine, arterial and venous haemoglobin oxygen saturations are often used to estimate the severity of a disease and to guide therapeutic decisions. In veterinary medicine, haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO(2)) is usually calculated using a blood gas analyser and algorithms developed for humans. It is possible, therefore, that the values obtained in animals may be distorted, particularly in animals with a high haemoglobin oxygen affinity, like young calves. In order to verify this hypothesis, we compared the arterial (SaO(2)) and venous (SvO(2)) haemoglobin oxygen saturations calculated using three different algorithms, and the oxygen exchange fraction (OEF) at the tissue level, which is the degree of haemoglobin desaturation between arterial and venous blood (SaO(2)-SvO(2)), with the values obtained from the whole bovine oxygen equilibrium curve (OEC) determined by a reference method. The blood gas analysers underestimated SvO(2) values; consequently, the OEF was overestimated (by about 10%). Two methods of reducing these errors were assessed. As the haemoglobin oxygen affinity decreases during the first month of life in calves a relationship between PO(2) at 50% haemoglobin saturation (P50) and age was established in order to correct the calculated values of venous and arterial SO(2), taking into account the estimated position of the OEC. This method markedly reduced the error for SvO(2) and OEF. Secondly, the SO(2) was calculated using a mathematical model taking into account the age of the animal and the specific effects of pH, PCO(2), and temperature on the bovine OEC. Using this method, the mean difference between the OEF values calculated using the mathematical model and those calculated by the reference method was close to zero. The errors produced by blood gas analysers can thus be minimised in two ways: firstly, by simply introducing a P50 estimated from the age of the calf into the analyser before the measurement; and secondly, by calculating the SO(2) using a mathematical model applied to the bovine OEC. [less ▲]

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See detailChloride and Inorganic Phosphate Modulate Binding of Oxygen to Bovine Red Blood Cells
Gustin, Pascal ULiege; Detry, Benoît; Cao, M. L. et al

in Journal of Applied Physiology (1994), 77(1), 202-208

The influence of Pi and Cl on the equilibrium of oxygen binding to bovine red blood cells was assessed by plotting the whole blood oxygen dissociation curve measured under standard conditions with and ... [more ▼]

The influence of Pi and Cl on the equilibrium of oxygen binding to bovine red blood cells was assessed by plotting the whole blood oxygen dissociation curve measured under standard conditions with and without added KCl and K2HPO4. Both salts shifted the oxygen dissociation curve to the right. This effect was more marked at the highest saturation levels. At a given saturation level, the anion-induced shift was linearly related to the concentration of salt added to the blood. Cl had a greater effect than Pi. The relationship between changes in Po2 at 50% hemoglobin saturation (in Torr) and concentrations of ions added (in mmol/l) was equal to 0.0515[Cl] + 0.0302[Pi] (r2 = 0.94; P < 0.001). These changes were not due to the hyperosmolality induced by salt addition, since sucrose added in place of salts was without effect on the measured parameters. The oxygen exchange fraction expressed as percentage of saturation, i.e., the difference in hemoglobin saturation when Po2 decreases from 130 to 40 Torr, was linearly correlated to added anion concentration (in mmol/l) (= 0.102[Cl] + 0.059[Pi] (r2 = 0.95; P < 0.001)). No significant interaction between the anions was observed; their effects were purely additive. This original mechanism of controlling the oxygen affinity of bovine blood may have clinical relevance: Cl and Pi could be used to increase oxygen transport efficiency in hypoxic animals [less ▲]

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