References of "Delcourt, Cécile"
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See detailSharing Goods? Yuck, No! An Investigation of Consumers’ Contamination Concerns About Access-Based Services
Hazee, Simon ULiege; Van Vaerenbergh, Yves; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege et al

in Journal of Service Research (in press)

Although access-based services (ABS) offer many benefits, convincing consumers to use these service innovations remains challenging. Research suggests that contamination concerns are an important barrier ... [more ▼]

Although access-based services (ABS) offer many benefits, convincing consumers to use these service innovations remains challenging. Research suggests that contamination concerns are an important barrier to consumer adoption of ABS; they arise when a person believes someone else has touched an object and transferred residue or germs. However, systematic examination of this phenomenon is lacking. We conduct four experiments to determine (1) the impact of contamination concerns on consumer evaluations of ABS, (2) when such concerns become salient in ABS, and (3) how ABS providers can reduce these concerns. The results reveal that consumers experience more contamination concerns about objects used in proximity to their bodies, especially when those objects are shared with unfamiliar users, and that such concerns negatively influence their evaluations of ABS. Consumers also exhibit less contamination concerns about ABS that have high brand equity because of their elevated stereotype-related perceptions of the competence of those users. Firms’ advertisements depicting physical contact between shared objects and other users negatively influence ABS evaluations by consumers whose contamination concept is activated. This article provides insights for developing product, branding, and communication strategies to reduce consumers’ contamination concerns and maximize ABS adoption. © The Author(s) 2019. [less ▲]

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See detailThe History and Evolution of Hospital Design Strategies
Martens, Carmen ULiege; Herssens, Jasmien; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege

in The History and Evolution of Hospital Design Strategies (2019, September)

When improving our healthcare system, focus is currently put on physical improvement in space like improved hygiene, innovative devices, improved energy performance, improved ergonomics, ... An often ... [more ▼]

When improving our healthcare system, focus is currently put on physical improvement in space like improved hygiene, innovative devices, improved energy performance, improved ergonomics, ... An often overlooked key parameter is the focus on cognitive experiences of people (e.g. the psychic state of the patient, quality of live/work of staff, welcoming of the family). More research in design and a supportive design strategy is needed to understand the user perspectives within healthcare services to guide architects in their design process. This is where Design for All (EU), Universal Design (USA), or Inclusive Design (UK, AU) comes in. It is a design strategy which no longer considers the disabilities of the users but instead focuses on enabling and disabling conditions of the environment. However, the domain lacks design methods and parameters to link user experiences with the design principles. This study hypothesizes that many architectural design strategies for healthcare environments have a medical objective but neglect a Design for All-strategy with attention for abilities, emotions and experiences. A literature review is undertaken, and international hospitals are analysed by means of case study reviews and plan annotations. By exploring the historical evolution of hospital design, the paper attempts to identify the determinants which have shaped previous hospital design strategies. The evolution of hospital design is structured into different time frames which mark distinct directions in hospital design. Within each time frame, the role of the hospital as an institution, the design strategies, and the theory which supported design strategies are analysed. Design develops from needs, and the changing needs mark the evolution of the hospital facility. This reshaping of the hospital design may provide opportunities for generating new design conceptualizations. Consequently, insights may inspire the design community from a medical problem-solving design strategy towards a more socio-cultural design strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailDesign Supporting a‘Customer-Perceived Intimacy-Strategy in Healthcare Services
Martens, Carmen ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Herssens, Jasmien

in ICED2019: Responsible Design for Our Future (2019, July)

Given that we live in a time within a growing competitive healthcare market, the customer experience and healing opportunities are on top of the priority list. However, little attention has been dedicated ... [more ▼]

Given that we live in a time within a growing competitive healthcare market, the customer experience and healing opportunities are on top of the priority list. However, little attention has been dedicated on how to merge the disciplines of architecture, healthcare and management to create healthcare environments to enhance the customer experience and the healing process. The goal of this paper is to explore how design can foster customer-perceived intimacy within a healthcare context to achieve enhanced customer outcomes, such as customer well-being. Understanding the importance of customer-perceived intimacy is paramount, as customers are constantly exposed to intimate situations. The study suggest that there is potential for such situations to be wrought with problems involving complexities associated with human cognition, emotions, physiological responses, and behaviors. A literature review is undertaken to highlight the antecedents and the short-term and long-term outcomes of customer-perceived intimacy. As a result, the paper provides a conceptual framework that raises many questions that need to be answered. In doing so, a solid foundation for future inquiry has been laid. [less ▲]

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See detailCustomer-Perceived Intimacy through the Design of Healthscapes
Martens, Carmen ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Herssens, Jasmien

Poster (2019, July)

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See detailExploring the Concept of Customer-Perceived Intimacy in Healthscapes
Martens, Carmen ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Herssens, Jasmien

in Forthcoming (2019, June)

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See detailThe Impact of the Servicescape on Customer Intimacy in Healthcare Services
Martens, Carmen ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Herssens, Jasmien

Conference (2018, June 22)

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See detailThe Impact of the Servicescape on Customer Intimacy in Healthcare Services
Martens, Carmen ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Herssens, Jasmien

Scientific conference (2018, May 30)

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See detailUniversal Design in Healthcare Servicescapes: Uncovering Multisensory Customer Experiences among Visually Impaired Pateints to Enhance Service Convenience and Customer Intimacy.
Martens, Carmen ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Herssens, Jasmien

Scientific conference (2018, March 23)

Healthcare services are subject to huge challenges such as improving user experience while being (economically) sustainable. However, little attention has been dedicated on how to create adequate ... [more ▼]

Healthcare services are subject to huge challenges such as improving user experience while being (economically) sustainable. However, little attention has been dedicated on how to create adequate healthcare servicescapes through an optimal architectural design to enhance service convenience and customer intimacy. Hospitals often lack awareness for architectural experiences and can even create disabling situations: this is especially true for visually impaired patients as servicescapes heavily rely on visual components while those may not be (sufficiently) perceptible to visually impaired patients. After an extended customer journey throughout four hospitals, in-depth interviews with visually impaired patients are conducted to uncover obstacles met by the patients and to identify multisensory qualities that patients would value to enhance the service convenience and customer intimacy. This multidisciplinary research will provide both managers and architects of healthcare facilities with insights on how to best define architectural design methods to improve both service convenience and customer intimacy. [less ▲]

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See detailDelivering Bad News: A Service Employee Perspective
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Greer, Dominique; Gremler, Dwayne

Scientific conference (2018, March)

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See detailThe Delivery of Bad News to Customers in Service Encounters: An Employee Perspective
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; Greer, Dominique

Conference (2017, June)

During service encounters, customer contact employees often need to deliver bad news: unexpected information contrary to the customer’s wellbeing. For example, technicians regularly tell customers that ... [more ▼]

During service encounters, customer contact employees often need to deliver bad news: unexpected information contrary to the customer’s wellbeing. For example, technicians regularly tell customers that none of the data on their computer hard drive can be retrieved, veterinarians often inform owners that a beloved pet has cancer and cannot be cured, and airline staff regularly tell travelers that their flights have been cancelled due to bad weather. For some customer-contact employees, delivering bad news is an unavoidable, delicate, and emotionally-charged task that occurs regularly. Disclosing bad news can be highly stressful and perhaps detrimental for (1) customers, (2) customer- contact employees, and (3) service firms in general. Accordingly, it is crucial for service organizations to better understand bad news encounters (i.e., situations during which customer contact employees must deliver negative information) to better equip their managers and employees to deliver such news to customers. The topic of how to best deliver bad news has been broached in various disciplines, including the medical literature (e.g., Baile et al. 2000, 2002; Rosenbaum et al. 2004), the management literature (e.g., Bies 2013; Kothari, Shu, and Wysocki 2009), and the sociology literature (e.g., Clark and LaBeff 1986). These literatures have (1) examined the attitudes and emotions of the discloser of extreme bad news in very specific contexts, (2) identified the tactics used by disclosers, and (3) developed protocols for delivering extremely negative information. Surprisingly, studies of bad news delivered by contact employees are scarce in service research. Service failure and service recovery have received much attention, but this literature has two major gaps when it comes to understanding the delivery of negative information. First, service recovery research generally skips over the initial part of the process where employees first communicate bad news to customers, and instead focuses primarily on the process involved to resolve the situation. Second, there are many situations in which employees must deliver negative information to customers where it is clear that a service failure has not occurred (e.g., informing a customer that his 30-year old dishwasher is beyond repair). We use the critical incident technique (CIT) (Flanagan 1954; Gremler 2004) to analyze 200 incidents where service employees from a wide range of service sectors had to deliver bad news to a customer. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to Reduce Rejection of Service Innovations? Uncovering Consumers’ Desired Organizational Actions in Access-Based Services
Hazee, Simon ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Van Vaerenbergh, Yves et al

Scientific conference (2017, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (10 ULiège)
See detailThe Disclosure of Bad News to Customers in Services: Integrative Framework and Agenda for Future Research
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, February 23)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (8 ULiège)
See detailLe client au cœur de l’organisation ?
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege

Article for general public (2017)

Une organisation est centrée sur ses clients (customer-centric organization) quand elle met le client au cœur de sa stratégie et de ses processus. Bien que mettre les clients au centre de l’organisation ... [more ▼]

Une organisation est centrée sur ses clients (customer-centric organization) quand elle met le client au cœur de sa stratégie et de ses processus. Bien que mettre les clients au centre de l’organisation peut sembler une évidence en théorie ; en pratique cela s’avère plus ardu. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (12 ULiège)
See detailBSimple, Embrace the digital transformation
Dadyko, Olena; Carbonnelle, Bruno; Hazee, Simon ULiege et al

Learning material (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULiège)
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See detailBurdens of Access: Understanding Customer Barriers and Barrier-Attenuating Practices in Access-Based Services
Hazee, Simon ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Van Vaerenbergh, Yves

in Journal of Service Research (2017), 20(4), 441-456

Access-based services (ABS), which grant customers limited access to goods without any transfer of ownership, are unique technology-based service innovations requiring the substantial involvement and ... [more ▼]

Access-based services (ABS), which grant customers limited access to goods without any transfer of ownership, are unique technology-based service innovations requiring the substantial involvement and collaboration of customers, without employees’ supervision. Although ABS offer several potential advantages, convincing customers to use them remains challenging. Combining 56 in-depth interviews with supplementary literature, the authors address this challenge by proposing an integrative framework that reflects the (1) barriers that prevent customers from using ABS and (2) practices in which customers engage to attenuate those barriers. The complex, multidimensional barriers relate not only to the service and technology features but also to other customers. Customers can engage in different practices to attenuate perceived barriers and create value, namely, “to distance,” “to manage,” “to elaborate,” “to control,” and “to relate.” Yet they regard these barrier-attenuating practices as necessary sacrifices to use ABS. Complementing suggestions that customers adopt and use ABS to escape the burdens of ownership, the current research reveals that customers actually may confront several “burdens of access.” This research suggests managers who wish to reduce rejection of their innovation could not only overcome customers’ perceived barriers, but also facilitate and reduce the number of practices in which customers engage to attenuate those barriers themselves. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Analysis of the Interaction Effect between Employee Technical and Emotional Competencies in Emotionally Charged Service Encounters
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; De Zanet, Fabrice ULiege et al

in Journal of Service Management (2017), 28(1), 85-106

Purpose—Customers often experience negative emotions during service experiences. The ways that employees manage customers’ emotions and impressions about whether the service provider is concerned for them ... [more ▼]

Purpose—Customers often experience negative emotions during service experiences. The ways that employees manage customers’ emotions and impressions about whether the service provider is concerned for them in such emotionally charged service encounters (ECSEs) is crucial, considering the criticality of the encounter. Drawing on cognitive appraisal theory, this study proposes that two key competencies—employee emotional competence (EEC) and employee technical competence (ETC)—affect negative customer emotions and customer satisfaction with employee response in ECSEs. Design/methodology—This study relies on a video-based experiment that depicts a customer involved in an ECSE as a service provider delivers bad news to him. The hypothesis tests use a two-way independent analysis of covariance. Results—Both emotional and technical competencies must be displayed to improve the customer experience in an ECSE. When EEC is low, ETC does not decrease negative customer emotions or increase customer satisfaction with employee response. When EEC is high, ETC instead has a significant impact on both customer outcomes. Practical implications—Managers must train employees to develop both technical and emotional competencies. Employees who demonstrate only one type cannot temper customers’ emotions or enhance their perceptions of the employees’ response as well as can those strong in both competencies. Originality/value—Using a video-based experiment, this study examines the moderating role of EEC in the relationship between ETC and two key aspects of the customer experience in an ECSE (negative customer emotions and customer satisfaction with employee responses) following the delivery of bad news. [less ▲]

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See detailL'Expérience, l'Enjeu de Demain
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege

Article for general public (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 ULiège)
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See detailSharing a Car? Yuck, No! An Investigation of Consumer Contamination in Access-Based Services
Hazee, Simon ULiege; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Van Vaerenbergh, Yves

Conference (2016, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (9 ULiège)