References of "De Ridder, Maaike"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGrowth determinants of timber species Triplochiton scleroxylon and implications for forest management in central Africa
Ligot, Gauthier ULiege; Fayolle, Adeline ULiege; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie et al

in Forest Ecology and Management (2019), 437

The sustainability of the polycyclic logging system in tropical forests has been increasingly questioned for a variety of reasons, and particularly in central Africa as commercial species, mostly light ... [more ▼]

The sustainability of the polycyclic logging system in tropical forests has been increasingly questioned for a variety of reasons, and particularly in central Africa as commercial species, mostly light-demanding long-lived pioneer species, usually fail to recover a stable number of large trees after exploitation. Several factors are known to affect tropical tree demographic processes, like tree growth, survival and recruitment. Tree growth has particularly been showed to depend on ecological conditions, tree genetics, and competition with surrounding vegetation, as well as tree size or ontogeny. Yet, due to the paucity of available data, the importance of such factors is unclear and usually ignored when estimating future timber yields. To fill this gap, we chose to evaluate the variability in growth of one African long-lived pioneer and commercially very important species: Triplochiton scleroxylon K. Schum, gathering a broad dataset composed of tree ring data recorded in one site in Cameroon and periodic field inventory data recorded in seven sites across central Africa. In total, we analyzed 13,225 records of annual tree diameter increments recorded over 920 trees from seven sites in Cameroon, Republic of the Congo and Central African Republic. We evaluated (i) to what extent the average growth of trees that reach harvestable dimensions differs from population average and (ii) to what extent past perturbations influence the growth of remaining trees. We found the diameter growth of T. scleroxylon to be remarkably variable and this study provided an unprecedented quantification of the magnitude of some key growth determinants. In unlogged forests, the diameter increment of T. scleroxylon ranged between 0.40 cm year-1 in Southern Cameroon and 0.83 cm year-1 in South-Eastern Cameroon. The diameter increment was weakly related to tree size but increased twofold from unlogged to logged forests. Perturbation caused by logging stimulates growth of T. scleroxylon for at least 10-15 years. Finally, harvestable timber stock of large-sized T. scleroxylon was found to be constituted by trees that grew in average twice faster than trees of the entire extant population. As more and more inventory data become available, quantifying these effects could be replicated for other timber species and in other sites, to improve the accuracy of future timber resource estimates and improve forest management guidelines. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 239 (32 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe Tervuren xylarium and wood biology to decode the ecological memory of forests and trees
Morin, Julie ULiege; Bourland, Nils; De Ridder, Maaike et al

Conference (2015, October 15)

Presentation of the competences held by the Wood Biology Service members of the Royal Museum for Central Africa, relative to their potential uses in archaeology.

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailContributing to wood anatomical databases to improve species identification, phylogeny and functional trait research in Central Africa
Morin, Julie ULiege; Fayolle, Adeline ULiege; De Ridder, Maaike et al

Poster (2015, May 26)

Central African rainforests shelter a high number of woody species that are anatomically very different. Knowledge of taxon-specific wood anatomical features has proven indispensable for scientific and ... [more ▼]

Central African rainforests shelter a high number of woody species that are anatomically very different. Knowledge of taxon-specific wood anatomical features has proven indispensable for scientific and non-scientific applications. The field of wood anatomy and identification has been drastically revolutionized by the development of internationally recognized lists of precisely illustrated microscopic features (e.g. IAWA Committee 1989), together with the launch of InsideWood, an online search database using these features to narrow down identification results (e.g. Wheeler 2011). However, despite these massive efforts, the anatomy of many species or even genera remains in the dark, especially in species-rich regions. Wood anatomy has been formally described for less than 25% of the Central African woody species (Hubau et al. 2012), the focus has been mainly on timber species and variations in wood anatomical structure remain to be explored. Therefore, we are assembling a wood anatomical database of about 800 species covering the Guineo-Congolian region using material from InsideWood and the Tervuren xylarium (new descriptions). As such, we present how large anatomical databases hold interesting perspectives for (i) wood and charcoal identification, (ii) exploring the phylogenetic signal of wood anatomy, and (iii) the relationship between wood anatomical features and functional traits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDensity variations and their influence on carbon stocks: case-study on two Biosphere Reserves in the Democratic Republic of Congo
De Ridder, Maaike; de Haulleville, Thalès ULiege; Kearsley, Elizabeth et al

Poster (2014, April 28)

It is commonly acknowledged that allometric equations for aboveground biomass and carbon stock estimates are improved significantly if density is included as a variable. However, not much attention is ... [more ▼]

It is commonly acknowledged that allometric equations for aboveground biomass and carbon stock estimates are improved significantly if density is included as a variable. However, not much attention is given to this variable in terms of exact, measured values and density profiles from pith to bark. Most published case-studies obtain density values from literature sources or databases, this way using large ranges of density values and possible causing significant errors in carbon stock estimates. The use of one single fixed value for density is also not recommended if carbon stock increments are estimated. Therefore, our objective is to measure and analyze a large number of tree species occurring in two Biosphere Reserves (Luki and Yangambi). Nevertheless, the diversity of tree species in these tropical forests is too high to perform this kind of detailed analysis on all tree species (> 200/ha). Therefore, we focus on the most frequently encountered tree species with high abundance (trees/ha) and dominance (basal area/ha) for this study. Increment cores were scanned with a helical X-ray protocol to obtain density profiles from pith to bark. This way, we aim at dividing the tree species with a distinct type of density profile into separate groups. If, e.g., slopes in density values from pith to bark remain stable over larger samples of one tree species, this slope could also be used to correct for errors in carbon (increment) estimates, caused by density values from simplified density measurements or density values from literature. In summary, this is most likely the first study in the Congo Basin that focuses on density patterns in order to check their influence on carbon stocks and differences in carbon stocking based on species composition (density profiles ∼ temperament of tree species). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULiège)