References of "De Clerck, Caroline"
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See detailRosmarinus officinalis essential oil as an effective antifungal and herbicidal agent
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; Bettaieb Rebey, Iness ULiege; Hanafi, Marwa ULiege et al

in Spanish Journal of Agricultural Research (2019)

In order to reduce the use of chemical pesticides, great interest has been focused on environment-friendly biological control agents and botanicals that preserve biodiversity. In this context, our study ... [more ▼]

In order to reduce the use of chemical pesticides, great interest has been focused on environment-friendly biological control agents and botanicals that preserve biodiversity. In this context, our study aimed to assess the antifungal and herbicidal activities of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil (EO) to find an alternative to synthetic pesticides. The chemical composition of R. officinalis essential oil was determined by gaz chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS). Results showed that R. officinallis EO was rich in monoterpenes and the major constituents were 1,8-cineole (54.6%), camphor (12.27%) and α-pinene (7.09%). However, under laboratory condition, two tests were carried out. The first one consisted on the study of EO antifungal activity using ELISA microplates and the second one consisted on evaluating the effect of EO on seedling growth of weeds. It was confirmed that this EO significantly inhibits spore germination of Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium culmorum, Penicillium italicum and at 6 mM, the percentage of inhibition reached 100% on Fusarium oxysporum. Indeed, EO slows down seedling growth of Trifolium incarnatum, Silybum marianum, and Phalaris minor. In fact, EO at 5 mM completely inhibits seed germination. On the other hand, another experiment was carried out to evaluate the herbicidal activity by spraying EO on weeds. This showed that a novel herbicide formulation was set up for the first time to improve the activity of R. officinalis EO on post-emergence. Overall, R. officinalis EO can be suggested as a potential eco-friendly pesticide and suitable source of natural compounds potentially usable as natural pesticides. [less ▲]

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See detailEtude de composés organiques volatils (COVs) émis lors de l'interaction hôte - pathogène par des souches produisant des mycotoxines.
Josselin, Laurie ULiege; De Boevre, Marthe; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege et al

Poster (2019, April 03)

Method for the qualitative detection (SPME) of VOCs emitted by toxigenic (mycotoxin-producing) and non-toxigenic (non mycotoxin-producing) strains.

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See detailHow could the herbicidal effects of selected essential oil compounds be related to their membrane activity ?
Lins, Laurence ULiege; Bettaieb, Ines; Dal Maso, Simon ULiege et al

Poster (2018, September 25)

The European legislation on plant protection products (PPP) is about to undergo important changes in the coming years. The chemical PPP destined to be removed from the European market are responsible for ... [more ▼]

The European legislation on plant protection products (PPP) is about to undergo important changes in the coming years. The chemical PPP destined to be removed from the European market are responsible for the appearance of resistance phenomena to plants pests. It is therefore necessary to explore new alternatives, one of them being the search for natural herbicides. Essential oils (EO) could provide a welcome alternative due to their proven activity as PPP. Even if these compounds seem to have a bright future as PPP, their activity is mainly approached through empirical observations. EO are also a complex mix of of different molecules that could act individually or in synergy. Particularly, very little is known when it comes to molecular mechanisms of action and the relations between structure and activity of the active compounds. This study aims to investigate the structure/activity relationships of some EO molecules, among which cinnamaldehyde (CIN) from cinnamon and citronellal and citronellol from lemongrass. Due to their lipophilic properties, EO tend to interact with one or more of the layers found in the outer plant tissues, among which the cell membranes. For cinnalmaldehyde (and other EO compounds), it has been shown that they are able to interact with bacterial phospholipids and induce change in lipid organization (fluidity, packing,..) on model lipid monolayers (Nowotarska et al, 2014). Citronnellol was notably shown to displace cholesterol from its phospholipid complexes (Lange, Y et al, 2009). However, nothing is known about any interaction with lipids specific to plant plasma membrane (PPM). In this study, we analyzed the effects of the above three EO compounds on model PPM by complementary in vitro and in silico biophysical approaches. We showed that the three compounds have differential effects on plant lipids and different herbicidal properties on plantae. While part of the herbicidal activity could be related to membrane perturbation, some clues remain to be elucidated. Future studies at a molecular point of view would help to better decipher the herbicidal action involving the membrane, other outer plant tissues such as the cuticule and/or and a potential effect on EO compounds on proteins or genomic DNA, as it was shown for CIN on E. Coli (He, TF et al, 2018). [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of Tunisian plant extracts as bioherbicide
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; Rebey Bettaieb, Ines; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege et al

Conference (2018, May 22)

Weeds constantly compete with crops for water and nutrient resources reducing yield, quality and consequently causing huge economic losses (Araniti et al., 2015) that can rise up to 34% in major crops ... [more ▼]

Weeds constantly compete with crops for water and nutrient resources reducing yield, quality and consequently causing huge economic losses (Araniti et al., 2015) that can rise up to 34% in major crops (Jabran et al., 2015). Actually, the current trend is to find a biological product to minimize the perceived impacts from synthetic herbicides in agriculture production (Sbai et al., 2016). In this context, the herbicidal activity of ten crude different extracts obtained from aerial parts of Tunisian spontaneous plants was determined on post-emergence at 7.5, 20 and 34 g/L against Trifolium incanatum, sylibum marianum and Phalaris minor. Aerial plant materials were grounded and macerated with methanol for 24H. Methanol was then eliminated using a rotavapor. The yield of plant extracts varied between 5.29% and 29.71 % following the species. Extracts 6, 8, and 3 exhibit the best activity in terms of visual effect by spraying on weeds. Moreover, a formulation was carried out to improve their efficiency. The results showed that formulated E6 has completely punctured Trifolium incanatum and has inhibited growth of Phalaris minor and Sylibum marianum. A fractionation of E6 was then carried out. Five fractions were obtained and tested on Trifolium incanatum. Among these fractions, F2 formulated at 20 g/L showed a very similar effect to a commercial bioherbicide. It caused the total death of Trifolium incanatum 9 days after spraying. Based on bioassay-guided fractionation, five compounds were identified which can be employed in developing new types of bioherbicides for controlling weeds on crops. In addition, the strong weed suppressive ability of formulated F2 therefore offers interesting possibilities as an effective natural environment-friendly approach for weed management. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of fungal volatile organic compounds emitted during quorum sensing as potential biocontrol agents
De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Jallais, Lucie; Vangoethem, Valentine et al

Conference (2018, May 22)

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See detailVolatile organic compounds emitted upon infection of barley roots by fungal pathogens: antifungal effects and mode of action
De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Fiers, Marie; Jallais, Lucie et al

Poster (2018, April)

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See detailStudy of the potential of natural volatile organic compounds to control cereal pathogens
De Clerck, Caroline ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, March 16)

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See detailLos volátiles microbianos y su potencial en el control biológico de fitopatógenos e insectos
De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Borrero-Echeverry, Felipe

in Marina Cotes, Alba (Ed.) Control biológico de fitopatógenos, insectos y ácaros: aplicaciones y perspectivas. V. 2 (2018)

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See detailAntifungal effects of volatile organic compounds emitted during infection of barley roots by fungal pathogens
De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Fiers, Marie; Jallais, Lucie et al

Poster (2017, December)

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See detailFirst Characterization of the Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Banana Plants (Musa sp.)
Berhal, Chadi ULiege; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; LEVICEK, Carolina et al

Conference (2017, June 16)

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in developing world's production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group is the Cavendish ... [more ▼]

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in developing world's production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group is the Cavendish variety, and Plantain represents that status for the cooking banana group. Despite the importance of the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which are secondary metabolites with a high vapour pressure, in their utility in the plant protection and communication processes, they were never documented for the plant itself. Thus, the aim of this PHD thesis is to study the VOCs emitted by the plant, rather than their fruits or flowers. A protocol was optimized for the extraction of the banana plant's VOCs. The results of the first analysis showed 11 VOCs for the Cavendish, mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene (87.90 ± 11.28 ng/µl), methyl salicylate (33.82 ± 14.29) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (29.60 ± 11.66), and 14 VOCs for the Pacific Plantain cultivars, mainly (Z,E)-α-farnesene (799.64 ± 503.15),(E,E)-α-farnesene (571.24 ± 381.70) and (E) β ocimene (241.76 ± 158.49). Most of these compounds belong to the terpenes group (8 for Cavendish, 10 for Pacific Plantain). The other compounds detected were ketones, esters and aldehydes. Eight compounds were common between the two varieties (myrcene, Z and E β-ocimene, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2 one, 6-methyl-3,5-hepadien-2-one, a-farnesene, methyl salicylate and β-ionone). This exploratory study paves the way for an in-depth characterisation of VOCs emitted by Musa plants. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of volatile organic compounds active against barley pathogens
De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Kaddes, Amine ULiege; Fiers, Marie et al

Conference (2017, May 23)

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See detailStudy of VOCs in the interaction between Banana and Foc TR4
Berhal, Chadi ULiege; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; LEVICEK, Carolina et al

Poster (2017, May 23)

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group is the Cavendish ... [more ▼]

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group is the Cavendish variety. Nowadays, the Cavendish is endangered by the newly emergent race of the Panama disease, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense TR4 (Foc TR4). Despite the importance of the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which are secondary metabolites with a high vapour pressure, in their utility in the plant protection processes, they were never documented as a way to manage this disease on Cavendish. Thus, the aim of this PhD thesis is to study the VOCs in the specific interaction Cavendish/Foc TR4, as a way to manage this threat. Based on the work previously done with other plants at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech/University of Liège/Belgium, a protocol was optimized for the extraction of the banana plant’s VOCs. And in parallel, models of in-vitro and in-vivo inoculations are under development, in order to distinguish the root zone from the upper part of the plant in the study. The results of the first analysis showed that the majority of the Cavendish VOCs belongs to the terpenes group, as well as ketones and an organic ester. The identified key VOCs of the interaction will be subject to toxicity tests, in order to determine their effect on the development of the plant and the pathogen. The banana plant is a staple food for more than 400 Million people in the world, while this disease persists as a major threat for its production, and this original study could contribute to the fight against this threatening disease. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst Characterisation of Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Banana Plants
Berhal, Chadi ULiege; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege et al

in Scientific Reports (2017)

Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana ... [more ▼]

Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana while cooking cultivars are widely consumed locally around the banana belt production area. Many plants, if not all, produce Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as a means of communication with their environment. Although flower and fruit VOCs have been studied for banana, the VOCs produced by the plant have never been identified despite their importance in plant health and development. A volatile collection methodology was optimized to improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of VOCs analysis from banana plants. We have identified 11 VOCs for the Cavendish, mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene (87.90 ± 11.28 ng/μl), methyl salicylate (33.82 ± 14.29) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (29.60 ± 11.66), and 14 VOCs for the Pacific Plantain cultivar, mainly (Z,E)-α-farnesene (799.64 ± 503.15), (E,E)-α-farnesene (571.24 ± 381.70) and (E) β ocimene (241.76 ± 158.49). This exploratory study paves the way for an in-depth characterisation of VOCs emitted by Musa plants. [less ▲]

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See detailLessons learned from the virus indexing of Musa germplasm: insights from a multiyear collaboration
De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Crew, Kathy; Van den Houwe, Ines et al

in Annals of Applied Biology (2017)

The Bioversity International Transit Center (ITC) for banana hosts more than 1500 accessions largely covering the genetic diversity of the genus Musa. Its objective is to conserve this genetic diversity ... [more ▼]

The Bioversity International Transit Center (ITC) for banana hosts more than 1500 accessions largely covering the genetic diversity of the genus Musa. Its objective is to conserve this genetic diversity and to supply plant materials to users worldwide. All the Musa accessions must be tested for virus presence and, if infected, virus elimination must be attempted, to enable the supply of virus-free plant material. An international collaborative effort launched under the auspices of Bioversity International (2007–2013) finally led to the implementation of a two-step process to test the accessions. The first step, called pre-indexing, involved only molecular tests and was designed as a pre-screen of new germplasm lines or existing accessions to reduce the need for post-entry virus therapy and repeated virus indexing. The second step, called full indexing, was performed on either older existing accessions or newer accessions which tested negative during pre-indexing, and involvedmolecular tests, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and symptom observation. In total, 270 germplasm lines (434 samples) were pre-indexed; while full indexing was carried out on 243 accessions (68 of which had been pre-indexed). A significant proportion of the samples tested during pre-indexing was infected with at least one virus (68%), showing the utility of this early pre-screening step. Banana streak OL virus and Banana mild mosaic virus were the most commonly detected viruses during both pre- and full indexing. For 22 accessions, viral particles were observed by TEM in full indexing while the molecular tests were negative, underlining the importance of combining various detection techniques. After full indexing, viruses were not detected in 166 accessions, which were then released for international distribution from the ITC. This publication exemplifies how the practical application of diagnostic protocols can raise fundamental questions related to their appropriate use in routine practice and the need for their continuous monitoring and improvement after their first publication. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of viruses infecting plantain (Musa sp., AAB genome) in the major growing regions in Cote d'Ivoire
Kouadio, Kouakou Théodore; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; Agneroh, Thérèse Atcham et al

in African Journal of Agricultural Research (2016), 11(44), 4532-4541

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See detailStudy of the volatile organic compounds in the interaction between banana plants and the fungal disease Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense Tropical Race 4 (FocTR4)
Berhal, Chadi ULiege; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; LEVICEK, CAROLINA et al

Conference (2016, October 11)

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide production, and has economical and nutritional key values. Cavendish is the popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group ... [more ▼]

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide production, and has economical and nutritional key values. Cavendish is the popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group. Nowadays, it is endangered by the emergent race of the Panama disease, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense TR4 (Foc TR4). Despite the importance of the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which are secondary metabolites with a high vapour pressure, and their role in plant protection, they have never been documented as a way to manage this disease on Cavendish. Thus, the aim of this PhD thesis is to study the VOCs in the specific interaction Cavendish/Foc TR4, as a way to manage this threat. Based on the work previously done with other plants at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, a protocol was optimized for the extraction of the banana plant’s VOCs. In parallel, models of in-vitro and in-vivo inoculations are under development to distinguish the VOCs emitted by the root zone and those emitted by the aerial part of the plant. The results of the first analysis showed that the majority of the Cavendish VOCs belongs to the terpenes group, as well as ketones and an organic ester. The VOCs specifically emitted during the plant-pathogen interaction will be studied more in depth by evaluating their effect on the plant and the pathogen. At long term, and depending on the results, agro-ecological applications of this knowledge could include breeding for new variety or combining banana with other plants expressing VOCs against Foc TR4, applying VOCs on field to stimulate plant defences or to contain the pathogen. [less ▲]

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See detailExtremophile plants as source of biopesticides against European damageable plant pathogens
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; Parisi, Olivier ULiege; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege et al

Poster (2016, September 14)

The use of plant-derived products in postharvest disease management may be a valid alternative to conventional chemical treatments (Pane et al., 2016). Unfavorable environmental conditions (such as salt ... [more ▼]

The use of plant-derived products in postharvest disease management may be a valid alternative to conventional chemical treatments (Pane et al., 2016). Unfavorable environmental conditions (such as salt and drought) increase production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, extremophile plants have developed adaptive responses including the synthesis of specific bioactive molecules used for medical and nutritional purposes (Ksouri et al., 2012). In that context, the main objective of the present study was the identification of effective plant extracts and essential oils from extremophile plants against the most important plant pathogens in Europe (in term of loss, treatment necessity and/or cost). The study began with the selection of four endemic medicinal species suspected to be antimicrobial due to their wealth of phenolic and terpene compounds, such as flavonoids, phenolic acids, and coumarins (Ksouri et al., 2012). Each of the aerial plant materials was grounded and macerated with solvent (methanol or chloroform) for 24 h. The solvent was then eliminated along rotavapor. The yield of plant extract varied between 1.56 and 6.7%. Kinetics of growth of the 3 pathogens cultivable in liquid medium was determined before testing the impact of plant extracts and essential oils. Methanolic and chloroform plant extracts (EM1, EM2, EC1 and EC2) and essential oils (EO1, EO2) were compared for their antifungal potential. The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts was analyzed by GC/MS. Yield of essential oil varied between 0.7 and 1.2%. Therefore, antifungal activity of plant extracts and essential oils was evaluated using ELISA microplates with a blocked randomized design, as described previously (Parisi et al., 2013). The results obtained showed that EM2 at 7 mg/ml has a very high fungistatic activity against Fusarium culmorum, F. oxysporum and Penicillium italicum. It was characterized with a high amount of polyphenols, flavonoids and condensed tannins. Statistical analysis showed that the efficiency of methanol extracts significantly differed from those of the chloroform extracts. In addition, essential oils significantly reduced spores germination in a dose-dependent manner. Their fungistatic activity reached 100% at 6000 ppm. In conclusion, this work allowed us to open new perspectives on the application of extremophile plant extracts as novel biocontrol strategy against plant pathogens. [less ▲]

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