References of "Dawans, Stéphane"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailConservation Ethics in the 21th Century: Towards an Extended Toolkit
Houbart, Claudine ULiege; Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

Conference (2018, March)

In his now classic essay on the « Régimes d’historicité », the French historian François Hartog (2003) has very well described the effect of globalisation, democratisation and mass consumerism on our ... [more ▼]

In his now classic essay on the « Régimes d’historicité », the French historian François Hartog (2003) has very well described the effect of globalisation, democratisation and mass consumerism on our relation with the past and thus, with heritage. In the course of the 1970’s, at a time when the ink of the Venice Charter was barely dry, postmodernity triggered a loss of collective anchoring and memory, paradoxically accompanied by an amplification of the thirst for commemorations, in the name of identity or heritage. Pierre Nora’s great endeavour « Les lieux de mémoire », fully corresponds to this « presentism » era, including aside from monuments, museum and archives, intellectual constructions such as the Larousse encyclopaedia (Nora 1989). It very well illustrates the « extension of the heritage domain » as defined by the sociologist Nathalie Heinich (2009). In our « post-monumental » era, anything can possibly become heritage, regardless of scale, of artistic qualities, of age or ontological degree – from tangible to intangible. This is a sign of times. Following the example of Nelson Goodman replacing the essentialist definitions of art with the question « When is there art ? » (Goodman 1976), we should consider focusing on a dynamic and operational definition of heritage. The question « When is there heritage ?» better correspond to contemporary cultural studies and our attempt to understand « heritagization »; it contains the idea of a performative action, implying new actors, new dynamics, new process, new research questions, new difficulties and new opportunities. And by necessity new concepts. We are far from rejecting theories from the past which provided us with effective and stimulating tools. But who could still imagine today, in the situation we described, that any system could fully encompass the heritage reality as the grand theories – Brandi, Riegl,… – succeeded to do? The repeated attempts to get the Venice charter revised from the 1970’s on (Houbart 2014), and the multiplication of thematic documents and charters are the best illustration of this impossibility. But while postmodern thinkers made us suspicious towards large systems, they also made us more modest and above all, more inclined to respect « bricolage », as a most helpful attitude after a shipwreck. We believe that the current return to a case by case approach – as promoted from the interwar period by theoreticians such as Ambrogio Annoni (1946) – often mostly relying on practical constraints such as reuse and technical performances, combined with the use of decontextualised concepts – separated articles from the Venice Charter, for example – and practices – using the Ise shrine periodical rebuilding to advocate any reconstruction project – doesn’t mean to accept a cynical relativism in answer to the cause of a capital-intensive machine. But in practice, we cannot deny that it has sometimes been the case: the clearest examples are the debates addressing the reconstruction of monuments all over Europe, based on a jumble of arguments confusing the pure mercantilism of the tourism industry or unconfessed political reasons with post-conflict identity issues or religious traditions (Monumental 2010). Reflecting on such reconstruction projects, raising questions of identity, has convinced us of the incompleteness of the toolkit we inherited from 20th century theoreticians. Though still perfectly relevant to address the issues that were already present at the time when they were elaborated, they might prove inappropriate to address new types of heritage, new concerns, new issues such as cultural tourism, inclusive approaches, modern heritage or the digital turn. In this context, we have been drawn to look at texts outside the conservation sphere, starting from ontology of art and analytical philosophy. We discovered that taking a step to the side could provide a stimulating insight on heritage conservation problems. In fact, it is not surprising that, facing what many have called a heritage inflation, some new actors could help us. Now that heritage has quitted the monuments sphere to encompass any material or immaterial reality worthy of conservation and that the expert point of view is challenged by the ones of a broad range of stakeholders, from the user to the investor, it becomes interesting to look at this reality from different points of view borrowed to a wide range of human sciences such as law, communication, aesthetics, semiotics, anthropology or philosophy, to name a few. Together with our colleague Muriel Verbeeck, we are currently gathering texts in order to propose an anthology that could complement the existing ones in helping to fill conceptual gaps and throw a reinvigorating light on new problems raising old questions. The originality of the project is to chose most texts outside the conservation world, and to address movable and immovable heritage at the same time. During our presentation, we will provide some examples of the usefulness of these new concepts, some already known by a number of conservators – such as the distinction proposed by Nelson Goodman between allography and autography (Goodman 1976) –, some not – the impact of intention on identity, based on texts by Theodore Scaltsas (1981), for example –, and will encourage the members of the committee who might be interested in this approach to contribute to the project. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailQuand l'"esprit nouveau" soufflait jusqu'à Liège
Bodart, Céline ULiege; Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

in Charlier, Sébastien (Ed.) Les utopies de Jean Englebert (2017)

Il s'agit de situer la carrière de Jean Englebert, Professeur à la Faculté des Sciences appliquées, section Architecture, dans le contexte d'effervescence "moderniste" qui a eu lieu à Liège autour de 1968 ... [more ▼]

Il s'agit de situer la carrière de Jean Englebert, Professeur à la Faculté des Sciences appliquées, section Architecture, dans le contexte d'effervescence "moderniste" qui a eu lieu à Liège autour de 1968 - ce que Nancy Delhalle appelle dans l'essai qu'elle a dirigé : le tournant des années 1970. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailUn classique : Georg Simmel. Les grandes villes et la vie de l'Esprit (1903).
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

in Schreuer, François (Ed.) Dérivations n°4 (2017)

il s'agit de la présentation d'un classique de la sociologie urbaine. Nous tentons de situer Simmel dans le cadre de la naissance de la sociologie urbaine. Nous répertorions les traductions du texte en ... [more ▼]

il s'agit de la présentation d'un classique de la sociologie urbaine. Nous tentons de situer Simmel dans le cadre de la naissance de la sociologie urbaine. Nous répertorions les traductions du texte en français. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULiège)
See detailLe Droit au théâtre : l’espace vécu 50 ans après Henri Lefebvre
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, April 19)

L'esthétisation de la vie quotidienne est un phénomène que le sociologue Daniel Bell a bien identifié dans les années 1960 et qui permet de mieux saisir les "contradictions culturelles du capitalisme ... [more ▼]

L'esthétisation de la vie quotidienne est un phénomène que le sociologue Daniel Bell a bien identifié dans les années 1960 et qui permet de mieux saisir les "contradictions culturelles du capitalisme". Cette fascination pour un art généralisé n'a probablement pas épargné Henri Lefebvre, le sociologue urbain français le plus lu aujourd'hui tant dans les universités américaines que dans les collectifs citoyens qui revendiquent "le Droit à la ville". L'espace vécu - qu'il oppose à l'espace conçu des experts et à l'espace perçu phénoménologiquement par tout un chacun - fait bien droit à l'événementiel, au spectaculaire (Debord parle de spectacularisation). Mais la machine capitalistique s'est bel et bien réappropriée la critique artiste et il se pourrait que l'inflation théâtrale nuise au théâtre plus qu'elle ne le serve. Que pourrait vouloir dire "Droit à la ville" ou "Droit au théâtre" dans le premier quart du 21e S? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPour une autre "architecturalité" ou la tentation de neutre d'Adolf Loos à Lacaton&Vassal.
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

in Jollin-Bertocchi, Sophie; Kurts-Wöste, Lia; Paillet, Anne-Marie (Eds.) et al La Simplicité. Manifestations et enjeux culturels du simple en art (2017)

Si Jarry, en ‘pataphysicien, n’avait pas hésité à prôner « l’inutilité du théâtre au théâtre », ces architectes pourraient aussi, dans le même ordre d’idées, affirmer l’inutilité de l’architecture en ... [more ▼]

Si Jarry, en ‘pataphysicien, n’avait pas hésité à prôner « l’inutilité du théâtre au théâtre », ces architectes pourraient aussi, dans le même ordre d’idées, affirmer l’inutilité de l’architecture en architecture, en tout cas de l’architecturalité. C’est cette tentative de neutraliser l’architecture – peut-être toujours déjà avortée - que nous voudrions suivre en guise de fil rouge dans notre exposé, cela en traversant des théories qui ont balisé la modernité architecturale depuis Ornement et Crime (1908). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailQuelques réflexions autour d'un texte de Théodore Scaltsas
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege; Houbart, Claudine ULiege

Conference (2016, December 02)

Face à l’extension du champ de l’intervention sur l’existant et au brouillage des limites entre rénovation et restauration d’édifices et d’ensembles allant du monument historique au bâti générique, ancien ... [more ▼]

Face à l’extension du champ de l’intervention sur l’existant et au brouillage des limites entre rénovation et restauration d’édifices et d’ensembles allant du monument historique au bâti générique, ancien ou récent, il semble plus que jamais utile d’accepter la notion de bricolage conceptuel et de réfléchir à une « boîtes à outils » permettant aux futurs architectes de faire face à la complexité des enjeux de la réhabilitation. En effet, face à ceux-ci, les théories de la restauration monumentale qui sont enseignées dans les instituts et facultés d’architecture atteignent parfois leurs limites et nous semblent devoir être complétées par/confrontées à de nouveaux concepts ou théories susceptibles d’élargir et même de renouveler notre vision des choses. C’est ainsi que depuis plusieurs années, nous avons choisi de faire un pas de côté et d’interroger des champs aussi éloignés que la logique formelle, l’ontologie de l’art et les théories littéraires et travaillons actuellement à une anthologie critique de textes variés mais tous susceptibles d’intéresser les conservateurs (du patrimoine mobilier et immobilier) et donc aussi, les architectes intervenant sur l’existant. Parmi ces textes, oeuvres d’auteurs en grande partie méconnus dans le champ du patrimoine, « Identity, Origin and spatio-temporal continuity », du philosophe Théodore Scaltsas, professeur à l’université d’Edimbourg, et extrait d’une revue en grande partie écrite en langage mathématique, nous parait particulièrement intéressant à analyser lors du séminaire. En utilisant des exemples aisément transposables au milieu de l’architecture, il aborde notamment la question de l’intention d’une reconstruction de manière originale et interpellante, qui n’autorise plus les fréquents amalgames justifiant tout et n’importe quoi et émanant non seulement du monde économique mais aussi des milieux du patrimoine dits autorisés. Par ailleurs, il enrichit le débat sur l’authenticité d’une dimension peu prise en compte à ce jour et particulièrement éclairante dans le cas des productions modernes et contemporaines, qui constituent l’un des enjeux les plus actuels de la réhabilitation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (7 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRewriting History in the Time of Late Capitalism: Uses and Abuses of Built Heritage : introduction to the session
Houbart, Claudine ULiege; Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

Conference (2016, June 05)

With his expression ceci tuera cela, Hugo established almost two centuries ago a strong link between words and stones as transmission vehicles of human memory. We heritage experts would be inclined to ... [more ▼]

With his expression ceci tuera cela, Hugo established almost two centuries ago a strong link between words and stones as transmission vehicles of human memory. We heritage experts would be inclined to consider stones as more reliable than words, what semiology seems to confirm : stones are clues, and clues are, according to Roland Barthes, tangible proves of “what has been”. But the inspector Columbo has often shown how we can play with these clues, and Umberto Eco would easily forgive us this incursion into mass culture to agree on the idea that we can rewrite history using false justified clues, that is also, tangible heritage. Since the emergence of the restoration discipline, experts have been aware of the danger of falsification : Ruskin’s texts, Boito’s philological restoration, Brandi’s historical instance or the Venice charter are so many illustrations of this concern. But since the 1990’s in Europe, a growing number of restoration and reconstruction projects very clearly depart from this fundamental idea. Of course, the collapse of the Soviet bloc has created a particular political context in which (re-)emerging nations attempted to (re-)build their identity through architectural symbols (leading to the writing of the Riga charter). But more generally, this phenomenon is closely linked to the cultural context : on the one hand, the postmodern movement has deeply questioned the idea of “sincerity”, with a tendency to blur the limits between true and false and, as a consequence, between original and copy. And on the other hand, in the heritage sphere, the globalisation of the debate progressively rattled european certitudes about concepts as essential as authenticity, leading to the replacement of the self-confidence expressed by the Venice charter by a careful relativism, illustrated by the Nara document thirty years later. These contemporary phenomenons have important side effects. In the context of late capitalism, heritage has become a major economic issue, especially as many cities have well understood its potentialities in terms of city branding. This could of course be seen as a positive opportunity for heritage conservation ; nevertheless, a rich scientific literature has shown that tourism can deeply transform our representation of the past. The tourist is a client rather than an amateur, and his quest of authenticity is often satisfied by what the French philosopher Yves Michaud has called “adulterated authenticity”, the one from over-restored monuments, reconstructed city centres, eco-museums, and, why not, theme parks. More than authentic built remains, the “tourist gaze” shapes more and more our representation of “what has been”, and the arguments developed by heritage experts in response to globalisation and identity issues are seized upon by city marketing specialists willing to meet a mostly commercial demand, sometimes tinged with dubious political motivations. What we intend to question in this session is the limit between uses and abuses of heritage and heritage discourse and more particularly whether, as suggested by Theodore Scaltsas’ inspiring paper “Identity, origin and spatiotemporal continuity” (1981), the intentions underpinning restoration and reconstruction projects affect the very essence of restored or reconstructed objects. Besides architectural history and conservation theory, we welcome contributions in the fields of sociology, anthropology, philosophy, history, political sciences, geography, tourism economy and even psychology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrom the spirit to the letter of the charters : mind the gap for the future
Houbart, Claudine ULiege; Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

in Szmygin, Bogusław (Ed.) Heritage in Transformation. Cultural heritage Protection in XXI century. Problems, Challenges, Predictions (2016)

Since the 1960’s and the foundation of ICOMOS, charters have been considered as a sort of conservation gospel. In this presentation, we would like to question this fact, in the light of the very ... [more ▼]

Since the 1960’s and the foundation of ICOMOS, charters have been considered as a sort of conservation gospel. In this presentation, we would like to question this fact, in the light of the very particular production and reception conditions of the documents. What may be perceived as a mostly provocative approach seems to us a constructive basis for future reflections. When we read and use charters – in this presentation, we will mainly focus on the Venice Charter, the Nara document and the Riga Charter – , we forget too often that they have been written by human beings, sometimes very tired, in a hurry, and even arguing with each other. The study of the archival material related to the writing of the Venice Charter and the Nara document very clearly illustrates that these documents are rather a conceptual “bricolage” than indisputable normative texts as if they had been written by lawyers. In the case of the Venice Charter, the archive as well as the records of Raymond M. Lemaire, Paul Philippot or Gertrud Tripp make clear that the document has been written at the last moment and adopted too rapidly by an assembly too glad to finally have a updated version of the Athens charter. As a consequence, only a few years later, Raymond Lemaire and Piero Gazzola already questioned the validity of the new text in the light of the extension of heritage debates to the city centers. On the other hand, the fact that a French and an English version of the Nara document were written in parallel by Raymond M. Lemaire and Herb Stovel in 1994 has had immediate consequences on the content and the formulation of the text, which logically left both of them unsatisfied with the result. Even so, the Venice charter and the Nara document still have force of law today. Yet, besides the particular circumstances of their writing, we must keep in mind that these texts answered specific questions, closely linked to the context: a critical answer to postwar reconstruction for the first, and apparently opposed visions of authenticity between East and West for the second. As far as the Riga charter is concerned, the influence of the delicate context of the Eastern bloc collapse is evident. For this reason, using such documents today requires at least a critical reading, going back to the spirit beyond the text. Our presentation will illustrate ad absurdum, through recent case studies, how a cynical reading of such documents can lead to interventions dangerously in conflict with this spirit and the fundamental ideals of conservation philosophy. In the era of late capitalism and heritage globalization, are we allowed to forget the conditions and the context in which our doctrinal documents have been written to justify anything and everything and to meet, for example, the “tourist gaze”, the “nouveaux riches” taste or the architect’s egomania? Do architects really want to know what the writers of the Venice charter’s article 9 meant by the “contemporary stamp”? What are the limits of the tolerance towards reconstruction first expressed by the Nara document, and a few years later, the charter of Riga? So many questions that ICOMOS must face if it wants to pursue its guiding mission in a mostly financial world. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (17 ULiège)
See detailTerritoire - La diversité comme argument politique dans la gestion des territoires
Tieleman, David ULiege; Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

in Brahy, Rachel; Dumont, Elisabeth (Eds.) Dialogues sur la diversité (2015)

La notion de territoire implique nécessairement une « lutte des places ». C’est dans cette perspective fondamentalement conflictuelle, inspirée de Marx et de Bourdieu notamment, qu’il nous paraît ... [more ▼]

La notion de territoire implique nécessairement une « lutte des places ». C’est dans cette perspective fondamentalement conflictuelle, inspirée de Marx et de Bourdieu notamment, qu’il nous paraît intéressant de relier la question du territoire à celle de la diversité. Partant d'une réflexion orientée sur le territoire, il faut reconnaître que, dans ce domaine, la notion de diversité peut revêtir des acceptions différentes, et parfois contradictoires. Dans le discours des acteurs du territoire, on distinguera à ce titre la diversité territoriale, impliquant la spécificité d'un territoire dans la création de son identité, de la diversité sociale, se référant à l'idée de mixité comme condition d'existence de la ville et fondement du lien social. Dans les deux cas, l'utilisation du concept de la diversité, ainsi vidé de son sens, constitue un argument de poids dans la justification de politiques conduisant, in fine, à la construction de la ville contemporaine néo-libérale faite de relégation, d'exclusion, et de fermetures. L'idée serait donc de montrer comment le concept de diversité peut être mobilisé comme argument politique, qu'il soit de gauche ou de droite, afin de justifier et de participer à la création de la ville néo-libérale morcelée, telle qu’elle se développe depuis les années 1980. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (39 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailINTERMÈDE. COUP DE THÉÂTRE ET CHANGEMENT DE RÔLES
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

in CLARA Architecture/Recherche (2015), 3

Architecture is often perceived as "not pure". Too much or not enough, It resists in many rankings. But this fundamental indeterminacy can be seen as an obstacle to the rationality or becoming itself a ... [more ▼]

Architecture is often perceived as "not pure". Too much or not enough, It resists in many rankings. But this fundamental indeterminacy can be seen as an obstacle to the rationality or becoming itself a real subject of research. We believe that architecture can help other disciplines' researchers to interrupte their "dogmatic slumber." [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCastelvecchio Calvisio: et pourquoi pas un scénario ruskinien?
Houbart, Claudine ULiege; Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

in Crisan, Rodica; Fiorani, Donatella; Kealy, Loughlin (Eds.) et al Restoration/Reconstruction. Small Historic Centres. Conservation in the Midst of Change, EAAE IV meeting and workshop (Roma - Castelvecchio Calvisio, October 28-31, 2013) (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (7 ULiège)
See detailPour une autre “architecturalité” ou la tentation du neutre d’Adolf Loos à Lacaton & Vassal
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

Conference (2014, June 03)

Des philosophes comme Daniel Charles, Daniel Payot et Sylviane Agacinski ont beaucoup insisté sur les implications de l’étymologie – plus précisément du lien que l’architecture entretient avec l’archè ... [more ▼]

Des philosophes comme Daniel Charles, Daniel Payot et Sylviane Agacinski ont beaucoup insisté sur les implications de l’étymologie – plus précisément du lien que l’architecture entretient avec l’archè (ἀρχή) – dans le projet métaphysique qui supporte notre conception occidentale de « l’art de bâtir », depuis l’Antiquité. Selon cette perspective, magistralement résumée par Vitruve au 1er S ACN, l’architecte (architekton) impose un triple dépassement à la simple pratique du constructeur : un supplément d’ordonnance (l’édifice doit être harmonieux), un supplément d’origine (l’édifice prendra, par exemple, la nature - sacrée - comme principe) et un supplément de représentation (l’édifice est digne de susciter une théorie, un traité). C’est pourquoi, dans son travail de déconstruction, Jacques Derrida se voit obligé de souligner, dans les années 1980, que cette « architecture de l’architecture a une histoire » - ce que nous aurions, selon lui, oublié au point de la tenir pour « naturelle ». Dans notre tradition, l’architecture se démarque donc de la construction par du « supplément » -d’âme ?-, le même « plus » sans doute qui distingue la littérature des « mots de la tribu », cet excès que l’on a depuis Jakobson indexé dans les sciences littéraires sous le terme de littérarité - un mot qui n’a encore pour équivalent en théorie d’architecture qu’un hapax : dans un texte tout à fait passionnant, Antonia Soulez risque, en effet, le terme d’ architecturalité, que ne reconnaît pas encore le correcteur orthographique des traitements de texte et qu’elle définit à partir de Valéry (dans Eupalinos), comme ce qui arrive à la construction quand les « colonnes chantent » … un supplément d’ordonnance inspiré par la musique, l’art par excellence depuis l’Antiquité. Et pourtant, l’on peut affirmer que des architectes – nous les qualifierons rapidement de modernes – ont tout mis en œuvre depuis le début du XXe S pour échapper à cet impératif de surplus, désirant ainsi dépasser cette tension entretenue depuis des millénaires entre prose constructive et poésie architecturale (Venustas), cela à partir d’Adolf Loos et jusqu’à Lacaton & Vassal, en passant par toute une série de grands noms qui nous semblent avoir voulu neutraliser cette opposition, au sens où Roland Barthes parlera de neutre durant ses cours au Collège de France en 1977 – 1978 : «toute inflexion qui esquive ou déjoue la structure paradigmatique, oppositionnelle, du sens, et vise par conséquent à la suspension des données conflictuelles du discours». Si Jarry, en ‘pataphysicien, n’avait pas hésité à prôner « l’inutilité du théâtre au théâtre », ces architectes pourraient aussi, dans le même ordre d’idées, affirmer l’inutilité de l’architecture en architecture, en tout cas de l’architecturalité. C’est cette tentative de neutraliser l’architecture – peut-être toujours déjà avortée - que nous voudrions suivre en guise de fil rouge dans notre exposé, cela en traversant des théories qui ont balisé la modernité architecturale depuis Ornement et Crime (1908). Pour éclairer notre propos, nous comptons convoquer des architectes (Loos, Wittgenstein, Mies Van Der Rohe, Bernard Huet, Pawson, Ando, les architectes suisses de « la nouvelle simplicité », Éric Gauthier, Lacaton & Vassal, etc.), mais aussi des philosophes ou essayistes aussi importants que Paul Scheerbart, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Umberto Eco, Nelson Goodman... Nous comptons aussi nous aider des outils de la sémiologie et de la rhétorique, afin de voir dans quelle mesure une architecture qui tente désespérément d’échapper à l’architecturalité en prônant, par exemple, l’absence d’ornement, l’idéal du « less is more » ou du « presque rien », de la banalité, du minimum ou encore de la simplicité peut tenir le pari, sans tomber dans le piège qu’Umberto Eco a bien décrit, à savoir que la logique des avant-garde architecturales « ne peut pas aller plus loin, parce que désormais elle a produit un métalangage qui parle de ses impossibles textes ». [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (9 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPiranesi's Haunt: the fascination for paradoxical spaces in the aesthetics of architecture today.
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

Conference (2013, July 24)

Rem Koolhaas, a major provocative figure on the global scene of architecture theory since 1978—when he published Delirious New York—clearly bases his rhetorics on obsessive patterns such as the loop or ... [more ▼]

Rem Koolhaas, a major provocative figure on the global scene of architecture theory since 1978—when he published Delirious New York—clearly bases his rhetorics on obsessive patterns such as the loop or intertwined spaces claimed as Piranesian. This is notably the case in Euralille, this large urban complex meant to revive the old French industrial city, where the reference to the 18th-century engraver is most obvious in a large destructured hall, in an accumulation of stairs, footbridges and escalators which, on the way out of the railway station, are deliberate reminders of the engravings of imaginary jails that emerged from the Venetian artist’s brain. Of course engraving, painting, photography and cinema have been using similar processes for quite some time to create a dizzying sensation with the spectator. Those high and low angle views of entangled planes based on seemingly paradoxical geometry denote a willingness to use the features of the sublime to create mixed feelings of fascination and anguish or to remind mankind of their mortal condition, in other words, of their finite nature. Romanticism is known to have been quite inspired by this dramatic force. Yet what appeals to us in this revival of an aesthetics of the sublime is that it now crosses a new border as it imposes itself into public space, into city life. If films or 3ds digital games attract informed and consenting viewers, Piranesian spaces—Koolhaas also speaks of Junkspace—impose themselves to all and dramatize the modern man’s anguish without the slightest concern for his opinion. What kinds of ethos and of pathos underlie this contemporary theory of architectural and urban spaces inspired by Piranesi’s or Escher’s engravings? What literary strategies are at play? Why can the same obsessive spatial leitmotivs be found in plane puzzles, in films and in the new urban scenery? What does this aesthetics tell us about man in the 21st century? Can we talk of post-humanism? These are some of the basic questions this paper wishes to address in relation to the symposium’s theme Architecture and Urban Space. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailQuelques considérations sur la préservation de l'authenticité des quartiers résidentiels modernes du nord de Bucarest
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege; Houbart, Claudine ULiege

in Crisan, Rodica (Ed.) Conservation / Regeneration. The modernist neighborhood (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (22 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail"Identical" reconstruction and Heritage Authenticity: introduction to the session
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege; Houbart, Claudine ULiege; Piplani, Navin

Conference (2012, June 06)

Introduction to the session ""Identical" Reconstruction and Heritage Authenticity", highlighting the most prominent issues of the current debate in an international context.

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULiège)
See detailLes mégapoles face au défi démographique
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (9 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe minimum : une nouvelle utopie de l'écriture architecturale contemporaine
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege

in Hyppolite, Pierre (Ed.) Architecture et littérature contemporaines (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (14 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe patrimoine "à l'état gazeux": Comment le tourisme détourne notre conception de l'authenticité
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege; Houbart, Claudine ULiege

in Le Patrimoine, moteur de développement. Actes du symposium de la XVIIème assemblée générale de l'ICOMOS (2012)

A l’heure où le tourisme constitue un des secteurs économiques essentiels du capitalisme culturel, il est intéressant de s’interroger sur son influence dans notre perception du patrimoine. En témoigne ... [more ▼]

A l’heure où le tourisme constitue un des secteurs économiques essentiels du capitalisme culturel, il est intéressant de s’interroger sur son influence dans notre perception du patrimoine. En témoigne l’intérêt qu’Umberto Eco, Jean Baudrillard, Yves Michaud et Marc Augé ont porté à cette question à partir de la sémiologie, de la sociologie, de la philosophie de l’art et de l’anthropologie des mondes contemporains. C’est dans leur sillage que nous voudrions proposer ici une approche un peu décalée, qui met en évidence un effet plus subtil, pervers et inattendu du problème : celui de l’hyperréalité et de l’importance du faux dans le jeu symbolique qui nous unit à l’histoire et au patrimoine. En effet, il nous semble qu’un phénomène proche du kitsch – et qu’il convient encore de définir – s’insinue progressivement dans nos critères d’évaluation au risque de modifier profondément ce souci d’authenticité qui reste pourtant essentiel en tant qu’idéal régulateur des politiques patrimoniales. Si l’évocation de Disneyland ou du « Jardin des mondes » de Pairi Daiza dans le Hainaut belge a de quoi faire sourire l’expert, le jeu complexe qui s’opère entre faussement authentique ou authentiquement faux n’est pas aussi éloigné qu’on voudrait le croire de grands projets de restauration ou de reconstruction que l’on observe ces dernières années. Il est parfois éclairant de passer par l’épreuve d’une démonstration par l’absurde pour tester utilement les fondements d’une discipline aussi sérieuse que la conservation du patrimoine. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (38 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLearning from Maasmechelen ou la ville comme décor
Dawans, Stéphane ULiege; Houbart, Claudine ULiege

in Pinto da Silva, Madalena (Ed.) EURAU12 Porto | Espaço Público e Cidade Contemporânea: Actas do 6º European Symposium on Research in Architecture and Urban Design (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (23 ULiège)