References of "Davies, G. R"
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See detailMean density inversions for red giants and red clump stars
Buldgen, Gaël ULiege; Rendle, B.; Sonoi, T. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2019), 482(2), 2305-2319

Since the CoRoT and Kepler missions, the availability of high-quality seismic spectra for red giants has made them the standard clocks and rulers for Galactic Archeology. With the expected excellent data ... [more ▼]

Since the CoRoT and Kepler missions, the availability of high-quality seismic spectra for red giants has made them the standard clocks and rulers for Galactic Archeology. With the expected excellent data from the TESS and PLATO missions, red giants will again play a key role in Galactic studies and stellar physics, thanks to the precise masses and radii determined by asteroseismology. The determination of these quantities is often based on so-called scaling laws, which have been used extensively for main-sequence stars. We show how the SOLA inversion technique can provide robust determinations of the mean density of red giants within 1 per cent of the real value, using only radial oscillations. Combined with radii determinations from Gaia of around 2 per cent precision, this approach provides robust, less model-dependent masses with an error lower than 10 per cent. It will improve age determinations, helping to accurately dissect the Galactic structure and history. We present results on artificial data of standard models, models including an extended atmosphere from averaged 3D simulations and non-adiabatic frequency calculations to test surface effects, and on eclipsing binaries. We show that the inversions provide very robust mean density estimates, using at best seismic information. However, we also show that a distinction between red-giant branch and red-clump stars is required to determine a reliable estimate of the mean density. The stability of the inversion enables an implementation in automated pipelines, making it suitable for large samples of stars. [less ▲]

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See detailPLATO as it is : A legacy mission for Galactic archaeology
Miglio, A.; Chiappini, C.; Mosser, B. et al

in Astronomische Nachrichten (2017), 338

Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale ... [more ▼]

Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but it will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental prerequisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will be possible only if we have at hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal that conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science. We therefore strongly endorse PLATO's current design and proposed observational strategy, and conclude that PLATO, as it is, will be a legacy mission for Galactic archaeology. [less ▲]

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See detailWeighing in on the masses of retired A stars with asteroseismology: K2 observations of the exoplanet-host star HD 212771
Campante, T. L.; Veras, D.; North, T. S. H. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters (2017), 469(2), 1360-1368

Doppler-based planet surveys point to an increasing occurrence rate of giant planets with stellar mass. Such surveys rely on evolved stars for a sample of intermediate-mass stars (so-called retired A ... [more ▼]

Doppler-based planet surveys point to an increasing occurrence rate of giant planets with stellar mass. Such surveys rely on evolved stars for a sample of intermediate-mass stars (so-called retired A stars), which are more amenable to Doppler observations than their main-sequence progenitors. However, it has been hypothesized that themasses of subgiant and low-luminosity red-giant stars targeted by these surveys - typically derived from a combination of spectroscopy and isochrone fitting - may be systematically overestimated. Here, we test this hypothesis for the particular case of the exoplanet-host star HD 212771 using K2 asteroseismology. The benchmark asteroseismic mass (1.45±0.10 -0.09M·) is significantly higher than the value reported in the discovery paper (1.15± 0.08M·), which has been used to inform the stellar mass- planet occurrence relation. This result, therefore, does not lend support to the above hypothesis. Implications for the fates of planetary systems are sensitively dependent on stellarmass. Based on the derived asteroseismic mass, we predict the post-main-sequence evolution of the Jovian planet orbiting HD 212771 under the effects of tidal forces and stellar mass-loss. © 2017 The Authors. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of Solar-like Oscillations, Observational Constraints, and Stellar Models for þetas Cyg, the Brightest Star Observed By the Kepler Mission
Guzik, J. A.; Houdek, G.; Chaplin, W. J. et al

in Anuario de Psicologia Juridica (2016), 831

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See detailSolar-like oscillations in distant stars as seen by CoRoT : the special case of HD 42618, a solar sister
Barban, C.; Deheuvels, S.; Goupil, M. J. et al

in Journal of Physics. Conference Series (2013), 440

We report the observations of a main-sequence star, HD 42618 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5765 K, G3V) by the space telescope CoRoT. This is the closest star to the Sun ever observed by CoRoT in term of its ... [more ▼]

We report the observations of a main-sequence star, HD 42618 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5765 K, G3V) by the space telescope CoRoT. This is the closest star to the Sun ever observed by CoRoT in term of its fundamental parameters. Using a preliminary version of CoRoT light curves of HD 42618, p modes are detected around 3.2 mHz associated to l = 0, 1 and 2 modes with a large spacing of 142 μHz. Various methods are then used to derive the mass and radius of this star (scaling relations from solar values as well as comparison between theoretical and observationnal frequencies) giving values in the range of (0.80 - 1.02)M[SUB]solar[/SUB] and (0.91 - 1.01)R[SUB]solar[/SUB]. A preliminary analysis of l = 0 and 1 modes allows us also to study the amount of penetrative convection at the base of the convective envelope. [less ▲]

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See detailSeismic Evidence for a Rapidly Rotating Core in a Lower-giant-branch Star Observed with Kepler
Deheuvels, S.; García, R. A.; Chaplin, W. J. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2012), 756

Rotation is expected to have an important influence on the structure and the evolution of stars. However, the mechanisms of angular momentum transport in stars remain theoretically uncertain and very ... [more ▼]

Rotation is expected to have an important influence on the structure and the evolution of stars. However, the mechanisms of angular momentum transport in stars remain theoretically uncertain and very complex to take into account in stellar models. To achieve a better understanding of these processes, we desperately need observational constraints on the internal rotation of stars, which until very recently was restricted to the Sun. In this paper, we report the detection of mixed modes—i.e., modes that behave both as g modes in the core and as p modes in the envelope—in the spectrum of the early red giant KIC 7341231, which was observed during one year with the Kepler spacecraft. By performing an analysis of the oscillation spectrum of the star, we show that its non-radial modes are clearly split by stellar rotation and we are able to determine precisely the rotational splittings of 18 modes. We then find a stellar model that reproduces very well the observed atmospheric and seismic properties of the star. We use this model to perform inversions of the internal rotation profile of the star, which enables us to show that the core of the star is rotating at least five times faster than the envelope. This will shed new light on the processes of transport of angular momentum in stars. In particular, this result can be used to place constraints on the angular momentum coupling between the core and the envelope of early red giants, which could help us discriminate between the theories that have been proposed over the last few decades. [less ▲]

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