References of "DENNISON, E"
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See detailPatients’ preferences for osteoarthritis treatment: the value of stated-preference studies.
Hiligsmann, M.; Pinto, D.; Dennison, E et al

in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (2019), 31(1), 1-3

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See detailIs There Enough Evidence for Osteosarcopenic Obesity as a Distinct Entity? A Critical Literature Review
Bauer, J. M.; Cruz-Jentoft, A. J.; Fielding, R. A. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2019)

The co-existence of impaired bone health (osteopenia/osteoporosis), reduced muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia), and increased adiposity (obesity) in middle-aged and older people has been identified in ... [more ▼]

The co-existence of impaired bone health (osteopenia/osteoporosis), reduced muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia), and increased adiposity (obesity) in middle-aged and older people has been identified in recent studies, leading to a proposal for the existence of “osteosarcopenic obesity” as a distinct entity. Evidence for the pathophysiological overlap of these conditions is mounting, although a causal relationship is yet to be established. Each component condition occurs frequently with increasing age, and with shared risk factors in many instances, thus, an overlap of these three conditions is not surprising. However, whether the concurrent existence of sarcopenia, osteoporosis and obesity leads to an increased risk of adverse musculoskeletal outcomes and mortality above and beyond the risks associated with the sum of the component parts remains to be proven and is a question of research interest. In this article, we review evidence for the existence of osteosarcopenic obesity including the current operational definition of osteosarcopenic obesity, prevalence, pathophysiology, outcomes and exploratory approaches to the management of components. We conclude that, there is insufficient evidence to support a discrete clinical entity of osteosarcopenic obesity at this time. To expand knowledge and understanding in this area, there is a need for consensus on a definition of osteosarcopenic obesity which will allow for identification, further epidemiological studies and comparisons between studies. Additionally, studies should assess whether the clinical outcomes associated with osteosarcopenic obesity are worse than the mere addition of those linked with its components. This will help to determine whether defining a person as having this triad will eventually result in a more effective treatment than addressing each of the three conditions separately. [less ▲]

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See detailSafety of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in osteoarthritis: outcomes of a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Curtis, E.; Fuggle, N.; Shaw, S. et al

in Drugs and Aging (2019), 36(suppl 1), 25-44

Objective: Our aim was to assess the safety of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors in the management of osteoarthritis (OA) in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled ... [more ▼]

Objective: Our aim was to assess the safety of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors in the management of osteoarthritis (OA) in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in the databases MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Ovid CENTRAL) and Scopus. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trials that assessed adverse events (AEs) with COX-2 inhibitors in patients with OA were eligible for inclusion. Two authors appraised titles, abstracts and full-text papers for suitability and then assessed the studies for random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants and personnel, blinding of outcome assessment, incomplete outcome data and selective outcomes reporting. The primary outcomes of interest were gastrointestinal disorders, cardiac disorders, vascular disorders, nervous system disorders, skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders, hepatobiliary disorders, renal and urinary disorders, as well as overall severe and serious AEs, drug-related AEs and mortality. Secondary outcomes were withdrawals due to AEs (i.e. the number of participants who stopped the treatment due to an AE) and total number of AEs (i.e. the number of patients who experienced any AE at least once). Results: Database searches identified 2149 records from which, after exclusions, 40 trials were included in the meta-analysis. The use of COX-2 inhibitors in OA was associated with a significant increased risk of drug-related AEs compared with placebo (relative risk (RR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.09–1.46; I2 = 24%). The risk of upper gastrointestinal complications (including dyspepsia, gastritis and heartburn) was significantly increased with COX-2 inhibitors versus placebo (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.03–1.38; I2 = 0%), particularly for abdominal pain, which increased by 40% with COX-2 inhibitors (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.08–1.80; I2 = 0%). The risk of hypertension increased by 45% overall (RR 1.45, 95% CI 1.01–2.10; I2 = 25%); however, when rofecoxib was removed from the analysis the risk of hypertension in the COX-2 inhibitor group was no longer significant (RR 1.21, 95% CI 0.80–1.83; I2 = 20%). The overall risk of heart failure and edema was increased by nearly 70% with COX-2 inhibitors versus placebo (RR 1.68, 95% CI 1.22–2.31; 0%) and this level of risk did not change appreciably when rofecoxib was excluded (RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.21–2.29; 0%). Conclusions: In our analysis, COX-2 inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal AEs, especially abdominal pain. We also found an increased risk of cardiovascular AEs with COX-2 inhibitors, namely hypertension, heart failure and edema. [less ▲]

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See detailSafety of opioids in osteoarthritis: outcomes of a systematic review and meta-analysis.
FUGGLE, N; Curtis, E.; Shaw, S. et al

in Drugs and Aging (2019), 36(suppl 1), 129-143

Objective: We aimed to assess the safety of opioids in the management of osteoarthritis (OA) in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Methods: A comprehensive ... [more ▼]

Objective: We aimed to assess the safety of opioids in the management of osteoarthritis (OA) in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in the MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Ovid CENTRAL), and Scopus electronic databases. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trials that assessed adverse events (AEs) with opioids in patients with OA were eligible for inclusion. Two authors appraised titles, abstracts and full-text papers for suitability and then assessed the studies for random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants and personnel, blinding of outcome assessment, incomplete outcome data and selective outcomes reporting. The primary outcomes of interest were gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, cardiac disorders, vascular disorders, nervous system disorders, skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders, renal and urinary disorders, respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders, as well as overall severe and serious AEs and drug-related AEs. Secondary outcomes were withdrawals due to AEs (i.e. the number of participants who stopped the treatment due to an AE) and total number of AEs (i.e. the number of patients who experienced any AE at least once). Results: Database searches identified 2189 records, from which, after exclusions, 17 papers were included in the metaanalysis. More disorders of the lower GI tract (constipation, fecaloma) were reported with both immediate-release (IR) and extended-release (ER) formulations of opioids versus placebo: IR opioids (relative risk [RR] 5.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.42–7.89); ER opioids (RR 4.22, 95% CI 3.44–5.17). The risk of upper GI AEs increased fourfold with ER opioids compared with placebo (RR 4.03, 95% CI 0.87–18.62), and the risk of nausea, vomiting or loss of appetite increased fourto fivefold with both formulations: IR opioids (RR 3.39, 95% CI 2.22–5.18); ER opioids (RR 4.03, 95% CI 3.37–4.83). An increased risk of dermatologic AEs (rash and pruritis; IR opioids: RR 3.60, 95% CI 1.74–7.43; ER opioids: RR 7.87, 95% CI 5.20–11.89) and central nervous system disorders (dizziness, headache, fatigue, somnolence, insomnia; IR opioids: RR 2.76, 95% CI 1.90–4.02; ER opioids: RR 2.76, 95% CI 2.19–3.47) was found with all opioid formulations versus placebo. Conclusions: Our results confirm that there are considerable safety and tolerability issues surrounding the use of opioids in OA, and support the recommendation of international and national guidelines to use opioids in OA after other analgesic options, and for short time periods. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel approach to estimate osteoarthritis progression: use of the reliable change index in the evaluation of joint space loss.
Parsons, C.; Judge, A.; Leyland, K. et al

in Arthritis Care and Research (2019), 71(2), 300-7

Objective: Osteoarthritis-related changes in joint space measurements over time are small and sensitive to measurement error. The Reliable Change (RC) index determines whether the magnitude of change ... [more ▼]

Objective: Osteoarthritis-related changes in joint space measurements over time are small and sensitive to measurement error. The Reliable Change (RC) index determines whether the magnitude of change observed in an individual can be attributed to true change. This study aimed to examine the RC index as a novel approach to estimating osteoarthritis progression. Methods: Data from 167 men and 392 women with knee osteoarthritis (diagnosed using the ACR criteria) randomised to the placebo arm of the 3-year Strontium Ranelate Efficacy in Knee Osteoarthritis triAl (SEKOIA) and assessed annually. The RC index was used to determine whether the magnitude of change in joint space width (JSW) on radiographs between study years was likely to be true or due to measurement error. Results: Between consecutive years, 57 to 69% of participants had an apparent (change less than 0) decrease in JSW, while 31% to 43% of participants had annual changes indicating improvement in JSW. The RC index identified decreases in JSW in only 6.0% between baseline and year 1 and 4.5% between the remaining study years. The apparent increases in JSW were almost eliminated between baseline and year 1, and between years 1 and 2 only 1.3% had a statistically significant increase, dropping to 0.9% between years 2 and 3. Conclusion: The RC index provides a method to identify change in JSW, removing many apparent changes that are likely to be due to measurement error. This method appears to be useful for assessing change in JSW in clinical and research settings from radiographs. Significance and Innovations: The aim of this research was to assess the effectiveness of the reliable change index as a novel approach to estimating OA progression, to date no studies have been identified that apply the RC index methodology within musculoskeletal research. Interestingly, the reliable change index provides a useful method to identify change in joint space width, removing many of the apparent changes that are likely to be due to measurement error. When compared to crude differences in joint space width measurements, implementation of the reliable change index dramatically reduced the proportions of study participants that were identified as having statically reliable change. This method appears to be useful for assessing change in JSW clinical and research settings from radiographs, and may have wider applications to other imaging modalities. [less ▲]

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See detailThe authors reply : Dual enrergy X-ray absorptiometry : gold standard for muscle mass ? by Scafoglieri et al.
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Landi, F.; Cesari, M. et al

in Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle (2018), 9

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See detailInternational Osteoporosis Foundation and European Calcified Tissue Society working group. Recommendations for the screening of the adherence to oral bisphosphonates.
DIEZ-PEREZ, A; NAYLOR, K.E.; ABRAHAMSEN, B et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(3), 767-774

Summary: Adherence to oral bisphosphonates is low. A screening strategy is proposed based on the response of biochemical markers of bone turnover after 3 months of therapy. If no change is observed, the ... [more ▼]

Summary: Adherence to oral bisphosphonates is low. A screening strategy is proposed based on the response of biochemical markers of bone turnover after 3 months of therapy. If no change is observed, the clinician should reassess the adherence to the treatment and also other potential issues with the drug. Introduction: Low adherence to oral bisphosphonates is a common problem that jeopardizes the efficacy of treatment of osteoporosis. No clear screening strategy for the assessment of compliance is widely accepted in these patients. Methods: The International Osteoporosis Foundation and the European Calcified Tissue Society have convened a working group to propose a screening strategy to detect a lack of adherence to these drugs. The question to answer was whether the bone turnover markers (BTMs) PINP and CTX can be used to identify low adherence in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis initiating oral bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. The findings of the TRIO study specifically address this question and were used as the basis for testing the hypothesis. Results: Based on the findings of the TRIO study, specifically addressing this question, the working group recommends measuring PINP and CTX at baseline and 3 months after starting therapy to check for a decrease above the least significant change (decrease of more than 38% for PINP and 56% for CTX). Detection rate for the measurement of PINP is 84%, for CTX 87% and, if variation in at least one is considered when measuring both, the level of detection is 94.5%. Conclusions: If a significant decrease is observed, the treatment can continue, but if no decrease occurs, the clinician should reassess to identify problems with the treatment, mainly low adherence. [less ▲]

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See detailErratum to: Can We Identify Patients with High Risk of Osteoarthritis Progression Who Will Respond to Treatment? A Focus on Epidemiology and Phenotype of Osteoarthritis (Drugs & Aging, (2015), 32, 3, (179-187), 10.1007/s40266-015-0243-3)
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Cooper, C.; Arden, N. et al

in Drugs and Aging (2017), 34

In the Original publication the affiliation for J. Kanis was incorrectly published. This previously read: WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School ... [more ▼]

In the Original publication the affiliation for J. Kanis was incorrectly published. This previously read: WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK. Should read: Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK. © 2017, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we identify patients to be treated in osteoarthritis?
Arden, NK; Richette, P; Cooper, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 61-62

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See detailCan we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment ? A focus on epidemiology and phenotype of osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Cooper, C; Arden, N et al

in Drugs and Aging (2015), 32(3), 179-187

Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society working meeting explored the possibility of identifying different patient profiles in osteoarthritis. The risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis include systemic factors (e.g., age, sex, obesity, genetics, race, and bone density) and local biomechanical factors (e.g., obesity, sport, joint injury, and muscle weakness); most also predict disease progression, particularly joint injury, malalignment, and synovitis/effusion. The characterization of patient profiles should help to better orientate research, facilitate trial design, and define which patients are the most likely to benefit from treatment. There are a number of profile candidates. Generalized, polyarticular osteoarthritis and local, monoarticular osteoarthritis appear to be two different profiles; the former is a feature of osteoarthritis comorbid with inflammation or the metabolic syndrome, while the latter is more typical of post-trauma osteoarthritis, especially in cases with severe malalignment. Other biomechanical factors may also define profiles, such as joint malalignment, loss of meniscal function, and ligament injury. Early- and late-stage osteoarthritis appear as separate profiles, notably in terms of treatment response. Finally, there is evidence that there are two separate profiles related to lesions in the subchondral bone, which may determine benefit from bone-active treatments. Decisions on appropriate therapy should be made considering clinical presentation, underlying pathophysiology, and stage of disease. Identification of patient profiles may lead to more personalized healthcare, with more targeted treatment for osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailGoal-directed treatment of osteoporosis in Europe.
Kanis, J. A.; McCloskey, E.; Branco, J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25(11), 2533-2543

Despite the proven predictive ability of bone mineral density, Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(R)), bone turnover markers, and fracture for osteoporotic fracture, their use as targets for treatment of ... [more ▼]

Despite the proven predictive ability of bone mineral density, Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(R)), bone turnover markers, and fracture for osteoporotic fracture, their use as targets for treatment of osteoporosis is limited. INTRODUCTION: Treat-to-target is a strategy applied in several fields of medicine and has recently become an area of interest in the management of osteoporosis. Its role in this setting remains controversial. This article was prepared following a European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) working group meeting convened under the auspices of the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) to discuss the feasibility of applying such a strategy in osteoporosis in Europe. METHODS: Potential targets range from the absence of an incident fracture to fixed levels of bone mineral density (BMD), a desired FRAX(R) score, a specified level of bone turnover markers or indeed changes in any one or a combination of these parameters. RESULTS: Despite the proven predictive ability of all of these variables for fracture (particularly BMD and FRAX), their use as targets remains limited due to low sensitivity, the influence of confounders and current lack of evidence that targets can be consistently reached. CONCLUSION: ESCEO considers that it is not currently feasible to apply a treat-to-target strategy in osteoporosis, though it did identify a need to continue to improve the targeting of treatment to those at higher risk (target-to-treat strategy) and a number of issues for the research agenda. These include international consensus on intervention thresholds and definition of treatment failure, further exploration of the relationship between fracture and BMD, and FRAX and treatment efficacy and investigation of the potential of short-term targets to improve adherence. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of components of the metabolic syndrome on progression of knee osteoarthritis in the SEKOIA study
Edwards, MH; Parsons, C; Eymard, F et al

in Rheumatology (2014), 53(1), 31

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