References of "DAVIN, Laurent"
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See detailOutcomes of Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis Followed Up in Heart Valve Clinics.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege; Magne, Julien; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege et al

in JAMA Cardiology (2018)

Importance: The natural history and the management of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) have not been fully examined in the current era. Objective: To determine the clinical outcomes of ... [more ▼]

Importance: The natural history and the management of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) have not been fully examined in the current era. Objective: To determine the clinical outcomes of patients with asymptomatic AS using data from the Heart Valve Clinic International Database. Design, Setting, and Participants: This registry was assembled by merging data from prospectively gathered institutional databases from 10 heart valve clinics in Europe, Canada, and the United States. Asymptomatic patients with an aortic valve area of 1.5 cm2 or less and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) greater than 50% at entry were considered for the present analysis. Data were collected from January 2001 to December 2014, and data were analyzed from January 2017 to July 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: Natural history, need for aortic valve replacement (AVR), and survival of asymptomatic patients with moderate or severe AS at entry followed up in a heart valve clinic. Indications for AVR were based on current guideline recommendations. Results: Of the 1375 patients included in this analysis, 834 (60.7%) were male, and the mean (SD) age was 71 (13) years. A total of 861 patients (62.6%) had severe AS (aortic valve area less than 1.0 cm2). The mean (SD) overall survival during medical management (mean [SD] follow up, 27 [24] months) was 93% (1%), 86% (2%), and 75% (4%) at 2, 4, and 8 years, respectively. A total of 104 patients (7.6%) died under observation, including 57 patients (54.8%) from cardiovascular causes. The crude rate of sudden death was 0.65% over the duration of the study. A total of 542 patients (39.4%) underwent AVR, including 388 patients (71.6%) with severe AS at study entry and 154 (28.4%) with moderate AS at entry who progressed to severe AS. Those with severe AS at entry who underwent AVR did so at a mean (SD) of 14.4 (16.6) months and a median of 8.7 months. The mean (SD) 2-year and 4-year AVR-free survival rates for asymptomatic patients with severe AS at baseline were 54% (2%) and 32% (3%), respectively. In those undergoing AVR, the 30-day postprocedural mortality was 0.9%. In patients with severe AS at entry, peak aortic jet velocity (greater than 5 m/s) and LVEF (less than 60%) were associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality without AVR; these factors were also associated with postprocedural mortality in those patients with severe AS at baseline who underwent AVR (surgical AVR in 310 patients; transcatheter AVR in 78 patients). Conclusions and Relevance: In patients with asymptomatic AS followed up in heart valve centers, the risk of sudden death is low, and rates of overall survival are similar to those reported from previous series. Patients with severe AS at baseline and peak aortic jet velocity of 5.0 m/s or greater or LVEF less than 60% have increased risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality even after AVR. The potential benefit of early intervention should be considered in these high-risk patients. [less ▲]

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See detailAngioedema: a rare and sometimes delayed side effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.
DAVIN, Laurent ULiege; MARECHAL, Patrick ULiege; LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULiege et al

in Acta Cardiologica (2018)

The effects of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors result from the inhibition of the ACE (kininase II) to ultimately influence both the renin-angiotensin system and the degradation of the ... [more ▼]

The effects of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors result from the inhibition of the ACE (kininase II) to ultimately influence both the renin-angiotensin system and the degradation of the bradykinin (BK) metabolism. ACE inhibitors block the degradation of BK and substance P by ACE. In addition, an active metabolite of BK (Des-Arg9-BK) is catalysed by kininase I and its degradation is controlled in part by the conversion enzyme. These molecules have been associated with increased plasma extravasation associated with ACE inhibitors. ACE inhibitors are the leading cause of drug-induced Angioedema (AE). Symptoms of AE mainly occur after the first month of treatment by ACE. However, very late onset cases, sometimes after several years of stable therapy, are also described in the literature. It has been observed that patients previously stable under ACE inhibitor will most likely develop AE soon after the addition of another medication, including the combination of aspirin or non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs with ACE inhibitor which has proved to be the most common cause, accounting for close to 50% of all AE cases related to ACE inhibitors. This side effect of ACE inhibitors, sometimes very late and rare, deserves to be recalled. [less ▲]

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See detailStatin therapy modulates thickness and inflammatory profile of human epicardial adipose tissue
Parisi, V.; Petraglia, L.; D'Esposito, V. et al

in International Journal of Cardiology (2018)

Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness and pro-inflammatory status has been shown to be associated with several cardiac diseases, including aortic stenosis (AS). Thus, cardiac visceral fat ... [more ▼]

Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness and pro-inflammatory status has been shown to be associated with several cardiac diseases, including aortic stenosis (AS). Thus, cardiac visceral fat could represent a potential new target for drugs. In the present study we evaluate the effect of statin therapy on EAT accumulation and inflammation. Methods: Echocardiographic EAT thickness was assessed in 193 AS patients taking (n.87) and not taking (n.106) statins, undergoing cardiac surgery. To explore the association between statin therapy and EAT inflammation, EAT biopsies were obtained for cytokines immunoassay determination in EAT secretomes. An in vitro study was also conducted and the modulation of EAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) secretomes by atorvastatin was assessed in paired biopsies. Results: Statin therapy was significantly associated with lower EAT thickness (p < 0.0001) and with lower levels of EAT-secreted inflammatory mediators (p < 0.0001). Of note, there was a significant correlation between EAT thickness and its pro-inflammatory status. In vitro, atorvastatin showed a direct anti-inflammatory effect on EAT which was significantly higher compared to the SCAT response to statin incubation (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The present study indicates a robust association between statin therapy and reduced EAT accumulation in patients with AS. The present data also suggest a direct relationship between EAT thickness and its inflammatory status, both modulated by statin therapy. The in vitro results support the hypothesis of a direct action of statins on EAT secretory profile. Overall our data suggest EAT as a potential new therapeutic target for statin therapy. © 2018 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailPredicting Disease Progression and Mortality in Aortic Stenosis: A Systematic Review of Imaging Biomarkers and Meta-Analysis.
Nchimi Longang, Alain ULiege; Dibato, John E.; DAVIN, Laurent ULiege et al

in Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine (2018), 5

Background: Detecting among patients with aortic stenosis (AS) those who are likely to rapidly progress, yet potentially benefiting from prophylactic aortic valve replacement, is needed for improved ... [more ▼]

Background: Detecting among patients with aortic stenosis (AS) those who are likely to rapidly progress, yet potentially benefiting from prophylactic aortic valve replacement, is needed for improved patient care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of imaging biomarkers in predicting the progression to clinical symptoms and death in patients with AS. Methods: We searched the Pubmed and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform databases for studies including patients with AS, and investigating imaging techniques, published in any language until Jan 1, 2018. Eligible sets of data include effect of imaging biomarkers relative to: (1) Overall mortality, (2) Cardiac mortality, and (3) Overall events (Symptom onset and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events). Meta-analysis was used to examine associations between the imaging biomarkers and outcomes of AS using Random Effect models. Results: Eight studies and 1,639 patients were included after systematic review. Four studies investigated aortic valve calcification (AVC) whereas the remaining investigated biomarkers provided by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Four articles investigated the presence of midwall fibrosis on late-gadolinium enhancement imaging, three reported its extent (LGE%) and two, the myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). By decreasing strength of association, there were significant associations between cardiac mortality and LGE% [Relative Risk (RR) = 1.05, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.10]; overall mortality and AVC (RR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05-1.36); overall events and ECV (RR = 1.68, 95%CI: 1.17-2.41); cardiac mortality and midwall fibrosis (RR = 2.88, 95%CI: 1.12-7.39). Conclusion: AVC and myocardial fibrosis imaging biomarkers predict the outcomes in AS, and help understanding AS pathophysiology and setting therapeutic targets. [less ▲]

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See detailL'image du mois: Anévrysme de l'apex du ventricule gauche chez un patient avec cardiomyopathie hypertrophique apicale
Weerts, Victor ULiege; BRUYERE, Pierre-Julien ULiege; Acasandrei, C. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2018), 73(4), 165-166

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See detailPourquoi traiter une occlusion coronaire totale chronique ?
MARECHAL, Patrick ULiege; GACH, Olivier ULiege; DAVIN, Laurent ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale Suisse (2017), 13(571), 1406-1409

Despite an incidence of about 15% of the patients undergoing coronary angiography, total chronic occlusions (CTO) are rarely revascularized by percutaneous angioplasty (PCI). Nevertheless, current ... [more ▼]

Despite an incidence of about 15% of the patients undergoing coronary angiography, total chronic occlusions (CTO) are rarely revascularized by percutaneous angioplasty (PCI). Nevertheless, current evidence suggest that successful CTO-PCI improve symptoms, quality of live and long-term survival. During the last years, improvement of specific techniques for these complexes procedures and increasing experience of operators allow actually to obtain success and complications rates almost equivalent to non-CTO lesions angioplasty. This review focus on the clinical benefits of CTO revascularization and on appropriate patient selection. [less ▲]

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See detailL’IMAGE DU MOIS.Une tumeur cardiaque indéterminée
RADERMECKER, Régis ULiege; RENSON, Virginie ULiege; Delvenne, Philippe ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2017), 72(1), 4-5

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See detailLeft ventricular regional function and maximal exercise capacity in aortic stenosis.
DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege; Magne, Julien; DAVIN, Laurent ULiege et al

in European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging (2016)

AIMS: The objective assessment of maximal exercise capacity (MEC) using peak oxygen consumption (VO2) measurement may be helpful in the management of asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients. However ... [more ▼]

AIMS: The objective assessment of maximal exercise capacity (MEC) using peak oxygen consumption (VO2) measurement may be helpful in the management of asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients. However, the relationship between left ventricular (LV) function and MEC has been relatively unexplored. We aimed to identify which echocardiographic parameters of LV systolic function can predict MEC in asymptomatic AS. METHODS AND RESULTS: Asymptomatic patients with moderate to severe AS (n = 44, aortic valve area <1.5 cm2, 66 +/- 13 years, 75% of men) and preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF > 50%) were prospectively referred for resting echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise test. LV longitudinal strain (LS) of each myocardial segment was measured by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) from the apical (aLS) 4-, 2-, and 3-chamber views. An average value of the LS of the analysable segments was provided for each myocardial region: basal (bLS), mid (mLS), and aLS. LV circumferential and radial strains were measured from short-axis views. Peak VO2 was 20.1 +/- 5.8 mL/kg/min (median 20.7 mL/kg/min; range 7.2-32.3 mL/kg/min). According to the median of peak VO2, patients with reduced MEC were significantly older (P < 0.001) and more frequently females (P = 0.05). There were significant correlations between peak VO2 and age (r = -0.44), LV end-diastolic volume (r = 0.35), LV stroke volume (r = 0.37), indexed stroke volume (r = 0.32), and E/e' ratio (r = -0.37, all P < 0.04). Parameters of AS severity and LVEF did not correlate with peak VO2 (P = NS for all). Among LV deformation parameters, bLS and mLS were significantly associated with peakVO2 (r = 0.43, P = 0.005, and r = 0.32, P = 0.04, respectively). With multivariable analysis, female gender (beta = 4.9; P = 0.008) and bLS (beta = 0.50; P = 0.03) were the only independent determinants (r2 = 0.423) of peak VO2. CONCLUSION: In asymptomatic AS, impaired LV myocardial longitudinal function determines reduced MEC. Basal LS was the only parameter of LV regional function independently associated with MEC. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of Serial B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Changes for Predicting Outcome in Asymptomatic Patients With Aortic Stenosis.
Henri, Christine; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege; Magne, Julien et al

in Canadian Journal of Cardiology (2016)

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the impact on the outcome of serial B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) changes during follow-up in asymptomatic patients with >/= moderate aortic stenosis ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the impact on the outcome of serial B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) changes during follow-up in asymptomatic patients with >/= moderate aortic stenosis (AS) and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. METHODS: We prospectively screened 69 patients who underwent comprehensive transthoracic echocardiography, BNP level measurement at baseline and after every 6 or 12 months. Annualized BNP changes were calculated as the difference between the last and baseline BNP measurements divided by the duration of follow-up. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of symptoms, aortic valve replacement, or cardiovascular death. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 30 +/- 19 months, 43 patients experienced a cardiac event. These patients were significantly older (73 +/- 9 vs 65 +/- 16 years; P = 0.010), had more often dyslipidemia (79% vs 42%; P = 0.038), more severe AS (peak velocity: 3.9 +/- 0.6 vs 3.5 +/- 0.6 m/s; P = 0.002), larger indexed left atrial area (10.2 +/- 2.5 vs 8.7 +/- 1.9 cm2/m2; P = 0.006), and a higher increase in annualized BNP (+90 +/- 155 vs +7 +/- 49 pg/mL/y; P = 0.010). Patients with higher annualized BNP changes (> 20 pg/mL/y) had a significantly lower cardiac event-free survival (1 year: 63 +/- 8% vs 97 +/- 3%; 3 years: 31 +/- 8% vs 68 +/- 8%; P < 0.001). Using the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, higher annualized BNP changes were significantly associated with increased risk of cardiac events (hazard ratio: 2.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.27-5.86; P = 0.010) after adjustment for age, dyslipidemia, and echocardiographic parameters. CONCLUSIONS: In asymptomatic patients with AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, the use of serial BNP changes may help to anticipate development of class I indication for aortic valve replacement. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in stable outpatients with coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. International CLARIFY registry
Fauchier, L.; Greenlaw, N.; Ferrari, R. et al

in PLoS ONE (2015), 10(4),

Background Few data are available regarding the use of antithrombotic strategies in coronary artery disease patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in everyday practice. We sought to describe the ... [more ▼]

Background Few data are available regarding the use of antithrombotic strategies in coronary artery disease patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in everyday practice. We sought to describe the prevalence of AF and its antithrombotic management in a contemporary population of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Methods and Findings CLARIFY is an international, prospective, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease, defined as prior (≥12 months) myocardial infarction, revascularization procedure, coronary stenosis >50%, or chest pain associated with evidence of myocardial ischemia. Overall, 33,428 patients were screened, of whom 32,954 had data available for analysis at baseline; of these 2,229 (6.7%) had a history of AF. Median (interquartile range) CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4 (3, 5). Oral anticoagulation alone was used in 25.7%, antiplatelet therapy alone in 52.8% (single 41.8%, dual 11.0%), and both in 21.5%. OAC use was independently associated with permanent AF (p<0.001), CHA2DS2-VASc score (p=0.006), pacemaker (p<0.001), stroke (p=0.04), absence of angina (p=0.004), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.001), increased waist circumference (p=0.005), and longer history of coronary artery disease (p=0.008). History of percutaneous coronary intervention (p=0.004) and no/partial reimbursement for cardiovascular medication (p=0.01, p<0.001, respectively) were associated with reduced oral anticoagulant use. Conclusions In this contemporary cohort of patients with stable coronary artery disease and AF, most of whom are theoretical candidates for anticoagulation, oral anticoagulants were used in only 47.2%. Half of the patients received antiplatelet therapy alone and one-fifth received both antiplatelets and oral anticoagulants. Efforts are needed to improve adherence to guidelines in these patients. © 2015 Fauchier et al. [less ▲]

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See detailElevated Plasma Soluble ST2 Is Associated with Heart Failure Symptoms and Outcome in Aortic Stenosis.
LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULiege; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege; Magne, Julien et al

in PLoS ONE (2015), 10(9), 0138940

B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is often used as a complementary finding in the diagnostic work-up of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Whether soluble ST2, a new biomarker of cardiac stretch, is ... [more ▼]

B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is often used as a complementary finding in the diagnostic work-up of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Whether soluble ST2, a new biomarker of cardiac stretch, is associated with symptomatic status and outcome in asymptomatic AS is unknown. sST2 and BNP levels were measured in 86 patients (74+/-13 years; 59 asymptomatic, 69%) with AS (<1.5 cm2) and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction who were followed-up for 26+/-16 months. Both BNP and sST2 were associated with NYHA class but sST2 (>23 ng/mL, AUC = 0.68, p<0.01) was more accurate to identify asymptomatic patients or those who developed symptoms during follow-up. sST2 was independently related to left atrial index (p<0.0001) and aortic valve area (p = 0.004; model R2 = 0.32). A modest correlation was found with BNP (r = 0.4, p<0.01). During follow-up, 29 asymptomatic patients (34%) developed heart failure symptoms. With multivariable analysis, peak aortic jet velocity (HR = 2.7, p = 0.007) and sST2 level (HR = 1.04, p = 0.03) were independent predictors of cardiovascular events. In AS, sST2 levels could provide complementary information regarding symptomatic status, new onset heart failure symptoms and outcome. It might become a promising biomarker in these patients. [less ▲]

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See detailThe multi-modality cardiac imaging approach to the Athlete's heart: an expert consensus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging.
Galderisi, Maurizio; Cardim, Nuno; D'Andrea, Antonello et al

in European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging (2015)

The term 'athlete's heart' refers to a clinical picture characterized by a slow heart rate and enlargement of the heart. A multi-modality imaging approach to the athlete's heart aims to differentiate ... [more ▼]

The term 'athlete's heart' refers to a clinical picture characterized by a slow heart rate and enlargement of the heart. A multi-modality imaging approach to the athlete's heart aims to differentiate physiological changes due to intensive training in the athlete's heart from serious cardiac diseases with similar morphological features. Imaging assessment of the athlete's heart should begin with a thorough echocardiographic examination. Left ventricular (LV) wall thickness by echocardiography can contribute to the distinction between athlete's LV hypertrophy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). LV end-diastolic diameter becomes larger (>55 mm) than the normal limits only in end-stage HCM patients when the LV ejection fraction is <50%. Patients with HCM also show early impairment of LV diastolic function, whereas athletes have normal diastolic function. When echocardiography cannot provide a clear differential diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging should be performed. With CMR, accurate morphological and functional assessment can be made. Tissue characterization by late gadolinium enhancement may show a distinctive, non-ischaemic pattern in HCM and a variety of other myocardial conditions such as idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy or myocarditis. The work-up of athletes with suspected coronary artery disease should start with an exercise ECG. In athletes with inconclusive exercise ECG results, exercise stress echocardiography should be considered. Nuclear cardiology techniques, coronary cardiac tomography (CCT) and/or CMR may be performed in selected cases. Owing to radiation exposure and the young age of most athletes, the use of CCT and nuclear cardiology techniques should be restricted to athletes with unclear stress echocardiography or CMR. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of multimodality cardiac imaging in the management of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: an expert consensus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging Endorsed by the Saudi Heart Association.
Cardim, Nuno; Galderisi, Maurizio; Edvardsen, Thor et al

in European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging (2015)

Taking into account the complexity and limitations of clinical assessment in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), imaging techniques play an essential role in the evaluation of patients with this disease ... [more ▼]

Taking into account the complexity and limitations of clinical assessment in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), imaging techniques play an essential role in the evaluation of patients with this disease. Thus, in HCM patients, imaging provides solutions for most clinical needs, from diagnosis to prognosis and risk stratification, from anatomical and functional assessment to ischaemia detection, from metabolic evaluation to monitoring of treatment modalities, from staging and clinical profiles to follow-up, and from family screening and preclinical diagnosis to differential diagnosis. Accordingly, a multimodality imaging (MMI) approach (including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, cardiac computed tomography, and cardiac nuclear imaging) is encouraged in the assessment of these patients. The choice of which technique to use should be based on a broad perspective and expert knowledge of what each technique has to offer, including its specific advantages and disadvantages. Experts in different imaging techniques should collaborate and the different methods should be seen as complementary, not as competitors. Each test must be selected in an integrated and rational way in order to provide clear answers to specific clinical questions and problems, trying to avoid redundant and duplicated information, taking into account its availability, benefits, risks, and cost. [less ▲]

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See detailACE inhibitors in aortic stenosis: no fear just hope.
DAVIN, Laurent ULiege; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege

in European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging (2015)

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See detailPoster session 6: Saturday 6 December 2014, 08:30-12:30Location: Poster area.
Henri, C.; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege; Magne, J. et al

Poster (2014, December)

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See detailPoster session 5: Friday 5 December 2014, 14:00-18:00Location: Poster area.
Henri, C.; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege; Magne, J. et al

Poster (2014, December)

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See detailUsefulness of Serial B-type natriuretic peptide assessment in asymptomatic aortic stenosis
Henri, C.; Magne, J.; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege et al

in American Journal of Cardiology (2014), 114(3), 441-448

B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level may be a useful prognostic marker for the management of asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to identify the echocardiographic ... [more ▼]

B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level may be a useful prognostic marker for the management of asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to identify the echocardiographic determinants of BNP changes during follow-up in AS. We studied 61 asymptomatic patients with greater than moderate AS and preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction who underwent rest and exercise Doppler echocardiography with concomitant BNP level measurement at baseline. BNP measurement was repeated after inclusion every 6 months. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median of BNP changes during follow-up. According to parameters at rest, patients in the high BNP changes group had significantly higher E/e′ ratio. Statistically significant correlations were found between BNP changes and E/e′ ratio and indexed left atrial area. According to exercise parameters, patients in the high BNP changes group had significantly lower exercise-induced increase in LV ejection fraction. Statistically significant correlations were found between BNP changes and exercise-induced changes in LV ejection fraction. After adjustment for age, mean aortic pressure gradient, and BNP level at baseline, multivariate analysis identified indexed left atrial area, E/e′ at rest, and exercise-induced increase in ejection fraction as independent determinants of BNP changes during follow-up. In conclusion, this study shows that, in asymptomatic patients with preserved LV function and moderate AS, serial BNP measurements may widely vary. Subclinical LV diastolic and systolic dysfunctions are frequently present in patients with higher serial BNP changes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailComment j'explore⋯ Une suspicion de dysplasie arythmogéne du ventricule droit
BENOIT, Arnaud ULiege; DAVIN, Laurent ULiege; GACH, Olivier ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014)

La dysplasie arythmogène du ventricule droit est une pathologie rare, mais non exceptionnelle, associant la survenue d’arythmies pouvant être mortelles à une détérioration progressive de la structure et ... [more ▼]

La dysplasie arythmogène du ventricule droit est une pathologie rare, mais non exceptionnelle, associant la survenue d’arythmies pouvant être mortelles à une détérioration progressive de la structure et de la fonction du ventricule droit. Dans cet article, nous rappelons les bases étiopathogéniques de l’affection et insistons sur la démarche diagnostique. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen the heart has its reason: the Takotsubo Syndrome
DAVIN, Laurent ULiege; LEGRAND, Victor ULiege; LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULiege et al

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2014)

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