References of "Culot, Laurence"
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See detailSpontaneous Tool Use by a Wild Black Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus)
Kaisin, Olivier ULiege; Amaral, Rodrigo; Bufalo, Felipe et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2020)

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See detailSmall Neotropical primates promote the natural regeneration of anthropogenically disturbed areas
Heymann, Eckhard W.; Culot, Laurence ULiege; Knogge, Christoph et al

in Scientific Reports (2019), 9

Increasingly large proportions of tropical forests are anthropogenically disturbed. Where natural regeneration is possible at all, it requires the input of plant seeds through seed dispersal from the ... [more ▼]

Increasingly large proportions of tropical forests are anthropogenically disturbed. Where natural regeneration is possible at all, it requires the input of plant seeds through seed dispersal from the forest matrix. Zoochorous seed dispersal – the major seed dispersal mode for woody plants in tropical forests – is particularly important for natural regeneration. In this study, covering a period of more than 20 years, we show that small New World primates, the tamarins Saguinus mystax and Leontocebus nigrifrons, increase their use of an anthropogenically disturbed area over time and disperse seeds from primary forest tree species into this area. Through monitoring the fate of seeds and through parentage analyses of seedlings of the legume Parkia panurensis from the disturbed area and candidate parents from the primary forest matrix, we show that tamarin seed dispersal is effective and contributes to the natural regeneration of the disturbed area. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysiological and behavioural responses to habitat fragmentation by black lion tamarins
Kaisin, Olivier ULiege; Culot, Laurence ULiege; Poncin, Pascal ULiege et al

Conference (2018, November 13)

Habitat fragmentation is one of the major threats hanging over primate populations in South America. Before affecting primates at a population level, environmental perturbations affect the physiology of ... [more ▼]

Habitat fragmentation is one of the major threats hanging over primate populations in South America. Before affecting primates at a population level, environmental perturbations affect the physiology of the individuals. Glucocorticoids (GCs), often referred to as stress hormones, are metabolic hormones which mediate the energetic demands needed to overcome predictable and unpredictable environmental and social challenges. These physiological biomarkers play a key role in enabling individuals to respond to stressors and restore physiological homeostasis. How primates adapt to habitat fragmentation pressures remains poorly understood. The aim of this research is to investigate the physiological and behavioural responses of the endangered black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus) living in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, a habitat particularly affected by fragmentation. The three specific objectives of this research are: (1) reviewing the effect of anthropogenic habitat disturbance on the well-being of primates, (2) analysing variation in chronic stress of tamarins in different forest fragment quality, and (3) relating transient stress levels to behavioural patterns. The first objective will consist of an extensive bibliographic research to identify how habitat disturbance variables affect primate well-being. Regarding physiological markers, we will use two different matrixes to measure GC concentrations. First, GC levels in hair samples (hair cortisol concentrations-HCC) will provide us with information on long term adrenocortical activity, recounting the animal’s chronic stress levels. Second, faecal GC levels will inform us about short term exposure to stress unfolding the animal’s daily fluctuations. Consequently, to approach the second objective, we will compare habitat quality with the HCCs of six tamarin groups living in fragments of different quality. For the third objective, we will compare faecal GC levels with behaviour patterns collected during daily follow-ups of three tamarin groups. This project will be conducted as a joint-PhD between ULiège and the Sao Paulo State University (Brazil). Evaluating stress levels in primate populations living in fragmented landscapes can shed light on how primates respond to such habitat perturbations and how significant it is for their survival. [less ▲]

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See detailATLANTIC-FRUGIVORY: A PLANT-FRUGIVORE INTERACTION DATASET FOR THE ATLANTIC FOREST
Bello, C; Galetti, M; Montan, D et al

in Ecology (2017)

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See detailPersistence of the effec of frugivore identity on post-dispersal seed fate: consequences for the assessment of functional redundancy
Lugon, Ana Paula; Boutefeu, Marion; Bovy, Emilie et al

in Biotropica (2017)

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See detailLong-term consistency of spatial patterns of primate seed dispersal
Heymann, E. W.; Culot, Laurence ULiege; Knogge, Christoph et al

in Ecology and Evolution (2017)

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See detailSeed dispersal by primates and implications for the conservation of a biodiversity hotspot, the Atlantic Forest of South America
Bufalo, S. F.; Galetti, Mauro; Culot, Laurence ULiege

in International Journal of Primatology (2016), 37

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See detailPartitioning the relative contribution of one-phase and two-phase seed dispersal when evaluating seed dispersal effectiveness
Culot, Laurence ULiege; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULiege; Heymann, Eckhard

in Methods in Ecology and Evolution (2015), 6

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See detailFrugivory and seed dispersal by northern pigtailed macaques, Macaca leonina, in Thailand
Albert, Aurélie; Hambuckers, Alain ULiege; Culot, Laurence ULiege et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2013), 33

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See detailSelective defaunation affects dung beetle communities in continuous Atlantic rainforest
Culot, Laurence ULiege; Bovy, Emilie; Vaz-de-Mello, Fernando Z. et al

in Biological Conservation (2013), 163

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (6 ULiège)
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See detailLocal extinctions of Primates: demographic and genetic effectson vegetation
Culot, Laurence ULiege; Galetti, Mauro

in Folia Primatologica: International Journal of Primatology (2013), 84(262),

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See detailFunctional Redundancy and Complementarities of Seed Dispersal by the Last Neotropical Megafrugivores
Bueno, Rafael; Guevara, Roger; Ribeiro, Milton C. et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(2), 56252

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 ULiège)
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See detailMamíferos não voadores do Parque Estadual Carlos Botelho, Continuum florestal do Paranapiacaba
Brocardo, Carlos Rodrigo; Reis de paula Rodarte; Silva Bueno, Rafael et al

in Biota Neotropica (2012), 16(4), 198-208

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULiège)
See detailSustainability of tropical forest biodiversity and services under climate and human pressure (BIOSERF): tracking the regeneration of human-used plants through dispersal by the animal community
Huynen, Marie-Claude ULiege; Beudels, R.; Baert, A. et al

Conference (2011, June)

The objective of the BIOSERF project is to assess the sustainability of a tropical humid forest ecosystem and the local human communities in southern Congo under future climate, demographic and societal ... [more ▼]

The objective of the BIOSERF project is to assess the sustainability of a tropical humid forest ecosystem and the local human communities in southern Congo under future climate, demographic and societal changes. The project focuses on the interactions between flora, fauna and local human population to understand the processes affecting biodiversity and ecosystem services in tropical humid areas, with the objective of setting up mechanisms to preserve local biodiversity. In close collaboration with a local NGO, it will use a dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB) which will be integrated within an agent-based model, to analyze the impacts of different ecosystem services in a tropical humid area, e.g. the production of medicinal plants, of wood and other forest products, or the services provided by the building of natural reserves. The vegetation model will be upgraded to take into account the process of regeneration of several plant species, selected for their use by local human populations, through a quantitative and qualitative description of plant dispersal by the animal community. To do so, a selection of five tree species frequently or traditionally used will be made based on the results of a sociological survey. Observations (direct or through camera trapping) of a sample of the selected species will allow identifying the main dispersers and the pattern of seed shadow they generate. Integrated into the CARAIB model, these results will allow figuring how the evolution of the dispersal community under pressures of climate change, habitat loss and hunting, but also potentially placed under managed protection could affect the services available to the human community. [less ▲]

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See detailReproductive failure, possible maternal infanticide and cannibalism in wild moustached tamarins, Saguinus mystax
Culot, Laurence ULiege; Lledo-Ferrer, Yvan; Hoelscher, Oda et al

in Primates: Journal of Primatology (2011), 52

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See detailTamarins and dung beetles: an efficient diplochorous dispersal system in the Peruvian Amazonia
Culot, Laurence ULiege; Mann, Darren J.; Muñoz Lazo, Fernando J.J. et al

in Biotropica (2011), 43(1), 84-92

Dung beetles fulfil several key ecosystem functions but their role as secondary seed dispersers is probably one of the most complexes because several factors can diversely affect the seed / beetle ... [more ▼]

Dung beetles fulfil several key ecosystem functions but their role as secondary seed dispersers is probably one of the most complexes because several factors can diversely affect the seed / beetle interaction. Little is known about the dung beetle communities and their influence on occurrence and depth of burial of seeds dispersed in small faeces. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of various factors (type of faeces, defecation pattern, season, habitat, seed characteristics) on dung beetle community (composition, number and size of individuals and species) and its consequences on occurrence and depth of burial of seeds primarily dispersed by two tamarin species. We captured dung beetles in a Peruvian rainforest with 299 dung-baited pitfall traps to characterize the dung beetle community. Seed burial occurrence and depth were assessed by marking, in situ, 551 dispersed seeds in faeces placed in a cage. We observed a significant effect of the amount of dung, season, time of defecation, and habitat on the number of individuals and species of dung beetles, as well as on seed burial occurrence and depth, while the type of faeces only significantly influenced the number and the size of dung beetles. Surprisingly, there was no significant effect of seed length, shape, and mass neither on seed burial occurrence, nor on burial depth. We highlighted that dung beetles compete for the first access to the resource on small faeces rather than for space for the building of their nest as observed on large faeces. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of resting patterns of tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis and Saguinus mystax) on the spatial distribution of seeds and seedling recruitment
Muñoz Lazo, Fernando J. J.; Culot, Laurence ULiege; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULiege et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2011), 32(1), 223-237

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (7 ULiège)