References of "Crevecoeur, Sébastien"
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See detailPotential resident bacterial microbiota in udder tissues of culled cows sampled in abattoir
Pirard, Barbara ULiege; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege et al

Poster (2018, June 19)

Aseptic milking samples and microbiological analyses are used in routine for bovine mastitis diagnosis. Few papers treated about a resident microbiota in the ruminant healthy mammary gland tissues (Spuria ... [more ▼]

Aseptic milking samples and microbiological analyses are used in routine for bovine mastitis diagnosis. Few papers treated about a resident microbiota in the ruminant healthy mammary gland tissues (Spuria et al., 2017), or about immunological consequences related with a such cohabitation (Rainard, 2017). In practice, it’s difficult to sample mammary gland tissues out of risks for cows health or milk production. We thus design a study based on samples taken at abattoir. It aimed at identify, quantify, compare the cow milk and mammary gland tissues microbiota of macroscopically healthy mammary glands, by classical microbiological analyses and by amplicon sequencing. We harvested thirteen couples of milk secretion and tissue samples, originated from the same quarter of reformed cows. Aseptic milking has been done just before culling and mammary gland tissues had been taken of the carcasses on slaughterline. Total and specific microbiological counting and metagenetic analysis were performed. Metagenetic analyses showed one main bacterial genus, Corynebacterium, generally found in the milk in higher proportions than in tissues. When it dominates clearly other populations in milk secretions, it can be found in the same quarter tissues. In case of identification of pathogenic bacteria in milk samples, the same pathogen were detected in tissues from the same quarters but in very different proportions: higher for Streptococcus uberis, lower for Staphylococcus spp or Enterococcus faecium. In tissues, Flavobacterium and Atopostipes genera were statistically more abundant than in milk. Data show also that species evenness and beta diversity are greater in mammary glands than in milk secretions. In opposition, species richness is higher in milk samples. These results show a potential resident microflora in mammary glands of culled cows in abattoirs. Metagenetic analysis of milk samples could be a good indicator of the udder microbiota and health in the future but our first results must be completed and confirmed on a larger number of samples. Hypothesis about nature of such a resident flora will have to be confirmed on producing cows before studying bacterial-host interactions. Rainard, P. 2017. Mammary microbiota of dairy ruminants: fact or fiction? Vet.Res., , 48 (25), 1-10. Spuria, L. et al. 2017. Microbial agents in macroscopically healthy mammary gland tissues of small ruminants. PeerJ, 5. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison between swabbing devices in order to analyse the microbial flora found on surfaces by classical microbiology and 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing
Krings, Simone ULiege; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege; Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULiege et al

Conference (2017, October 13)

The work in community kitchens involves several steps bearing the risk of transmitting pathogenic microorganisms from static or dynamic surfaces to the food. This study aimed at comparing the recovery ... [more ▼]

The work in community kitchens involves several steps bearing the risk of transmitting pathogenic microorganisms from static or dynamic surfaces to the food. This study aimed at comparing the recovery efficiency of different sampling devices in terms of culture methods and culture-independent 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing for characterising the microbial flora. In order to mimic surfaces found in community kitchens, sterile stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces were spiked with a two-fold raw chicken meat dilution and several concentrations of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Bacillus cereus, respectively. The ideal swab for kitchen analyses should recover the highest number of viable bacteria with the highest population diversity. Classical culture method showed that recovery was possible with all swabs, but that Sponge-Sticks had the highest recovery rates. The 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing revealed a high relative abundance of Bacillus genus in cotton pad, gauze pad and Sponge-Stick samples and low proportions of Salmonella genus in all samples. Analysis of Escherichia genus results was problematic for molecular analyses as it appeared as a source of DNA contamination of the reagents used during library creation. Furthermore, it was possible to decipher bias populations in the sponge samples (from neutralising buffer) and in controls (due to low amounts of DNA), allowing the exclusion of those in the following analyses, if needed. In the end, these results attest the similarity of population diversity in cotton pad, gauze pad and Sponge-Stick samples, leaving the final choice to the operator. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison between swabbing devices in order to analyse the microbial flora found on surfaces of community kitchens by classical microbiology and amplicon sequencing
Krings, Simone ULiege; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege; Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULiege et al

Poster (2017, September 22)

Introduction The work in community kitchens involves several manual steps bearing the risk of transmitting pathogenic microorganisms. This fact justifies accurate control of surfaces to prevent foodborne ... [more ▼]

Introduction The work in community kitchens involves several manual steps bearing the risk of transmitting pathogenic microorganisms. This fact justifies accurate control of surfaces to prevent foodborne illnesses. Different sampling methods have been proposed to isolate bacteria from surfaces, while the ensuing analysis of the surfaces is usually performed by classical microbiology and molecular biology methods [1,2,3]. Studies found in the literature do compare different swabbing devices for surfaces but not in terms of 16S rRNA gene profiling [4]. This study aimed at comparing the efficiency of recovery of different swabbing devices in terms of culture methods and culture-independent 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, the latter in order to characterise the present microbial flora. Material and Methods To mimic surfaces which can be found in community kitchens, sterile polypropylene cutting boards and stainless steel surfaces were spiked with 1mL of 2-fold dilution of chicken and with 1mL of several concentrations of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Enteriditis and Bacillus cereus, respectively. Collection of the bacteria was performed with sterile moistened swabs, including commercial swabs (sponges HS10NB2G, Sponge-Sticks SSL100; 3M) and cotton and gauze pads. Enumeration was carried out by aerobic plate count on Plate Count Agar (Bio-Rad), Rapid’E.coli 2 (Bio-Rad), Rapid’Salmonella (Bio-Rad) and MYP (Oxoid) which were incubated for 24h at 37°C. The V1-V3 16S rRNA amplicon libraries obtained from total bacterial DNA extraction were sequenced on a Illumina MiSeq sequencer and the resulting sequences were analysed with mothur software. Statistical analyses were performed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple comparisons by using Prism 7. Discussion The perfect swab for kitchen analyses should recover the highest number of viable bacteria with a high population diversity from the surfaces. Classical culture method showed best recovery numbers for the three inoculated bacteria with Sponge-Sticks (no significant difference between inoculation dosis and recovered number of bacteria, p > 0.1234). The 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing allows to conclude that sponge samples were loaded with DNA from Microbacterium genus (from Neutralizing buffer). Furthermore, a high relative abundance of Bacillus genus was found in cotton pad, gauze pad and Sponge-Stick samples. Salmonella genus was detected in only low proportions, whereas Escherichia genus are problematic as their DNA can be contaminants of reagents used during library creation. However, differences in recovery or enumeration with each method must be considered, as they can induce estimation bias on the initial concentration or recovered CFU/mL. Finally, low amount of DNA in controls leads to the emergence of free DNA contaminants like Elizabethkingia population, which can be considered as a bias. References 1. Ismaïl R. et al. (2013). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 10, 6169-6183. 2. Biranjia-Hurdoyal, S., & Latouche, M. C. (2016). Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol., 2016. 3. Malorny B. et al. (2008). Appl Environ Microbiol, 74(5), 1299-1304. 4. Lahou, E., & Uyttendaele, M. (2014). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 11(1), 804-814. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison between swabbing devices in order to analyze the microbial flora found on surfaces of community kitchens by classical microbiology and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing
Krings, Simone ULiege; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege; Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULiege et al

Poster (2017, July 11)

Background The work in community kitchens involves several manual steps which justifies accurate control of surfaces to prevent foodborne illnesses. Different sampling methods have been proposed to ... [more ▼]

Background The work in community kitchens involves several manual steps which justifies accurate control of surfaces to prevent foodborne illnesses. Different sampling methods have been proposed to isolate bacteria from surfaces. However, recovery efficiencies of these methods are very different and not always comparable. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate different sampling methods to detect the presence of pathogenic bacteria on surfaces in contact with foods. The recovery efficiency was examined by classical microbiology an culture-independent metagenomic analysis. Methods To mimic surfaces which can be found in community kitchens, sterile polypropylene stainless steel surfaces and cutting boards were spiked with serial dilutions of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Bacillus cereus. They were left to dry for 1-2 hours before collection of the surviving bacteria with different moistened swabs, including commercial swabs (sponges-HS10NB2G, Sponge-Sticks-SSL100; 3M) and cotton and gauze pads. Different solutions were tested to moisten the swabs (physiological water (0,85% NaCl), Maximum Recovery Diluent and quarter-strength Ringer solution). Bacterial population analysis was performed by classical methods and metagenomics. Conclusions Important differences on bacterial survival were observed depending on their nature and the solution used to collect them from the surfaces. Maximum Recovery Diluent and cotton pads showed the best results in relation with bacteria recovery and required technical skills. Metagenomic analysis showed a higher detection sensibility than classical microbiology. However, preliminary results showed that both methods are necessary to improve the detection of pathogens in surfaces. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of 3’-­‐sialyllactose and Bifidobacterium crudilactis on infant feces microbial composition and virulence modulation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, using the SHIME® gastrointes6nal model
Bondue, Pauline ULiege; Lebrun, Sarah ULiege; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege et al

Poster (2017, June)

Bifidobacterium crudilactis, a bacterial species from bovine origin, growths on bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO). Cell free spent media (CFSM) from B. crudilactis and 3’-sialyllactose (3’SL), a major ... [more ▼]

Bifidobacterium crudilactis, a bacterial species from bovine origin, growths on bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO). Cell free spent media (CFSM) from B. crudilactis and 3’-sialyllactose (3’SL), a major BMO, modulated Escherichia coli O157:H7 virulence gene expressiona. In this study, the SHIME® gastrointestinal model was inoculated with 4 different treatments: 3’SL (ttm1), B. crudilactis (ttm2), 3’SL and B. crudilactis (ttm3) and CFSM from 3’SL and B. crudilactis culture (ttm4). In each section of the colon, samples were collected and analysed for short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration using HPLC, microbial populations using 16S rDNA metagenetic analysis and correlated with E. coli O157:H7 virulence gene expression. The results showed that SCFA levels were stable during the experiments. Metagenetic analysis showed a microbial diversity in transverse (TC) and descending colon (DC) close to feces, dominated by Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium, while the ascending colon (AC) showed a different microbial diversity dominated by Veillonella. Ttm4 and ttm2 induced mainly a down-regulation of virulence genes: fliC in DC with ttm4, and luxS, stx1, qseA in AC, DC or TC with ttm2. Ttm1 also showed a down-regulation of fliC in DC, similar to the one observed with ttm4, but this was associated with an up-regulation of fliC and stx1 in AC or TC. Finally, ttm3 showed slight upregulation of ler, fliC and qseA in AC. These results show that ttm4 and ttm2 might have a positive effect against virulence expression of E. coli O157:H7. However, this trend has to be validated with the further replicates on the SHIME® system. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro screening of mare's milk antimicrobial effect and antiproliverative activity.
Guri, Anilda; Paligot, Michèle; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege et al

in FEMS Microbiology Letters (2016), 363(2), 1-7

The aims of this study were to examine the effect of mare's milk on virulence gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium and observe its potential activity on proliferation of adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells ... [more ▼]

The aims of this study were to examine the effect of mare's milk on virulence gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium and observe its potential activity on proliferation of adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Different supernatants of mare's milk, raw or heat-treated at 65°C for 15 s or 30 min, were studied. The changes in hilA gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium in presence of mare's milk supernatants were assessed using a reporter luminescent strain. A significant decrease in hilA gene expression was observed with all tested supernatants. Virulence gene expression was then assessed using qPCR on a wild-type strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. A significant decrease of hilA and ssrB2 gene expression was observed with raw milk supernatants but not with heat-treated supernatants. The same supernatants were administered to Caco-2 cells to measure their proliferation rate. A significant reduction of proliferative effect was observed only with raw milk supernatants. This study reports that raw mare's milk was able to modulate virulence gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium and exerts antiproliferative effects on Caco-2 cells. These results may offer new approaches for promoting gastrointestinal health. [less ▲]

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See detailOptmization of culture media for Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium crudilactis and study of the antimicrobial effect of culture supernatants
Bondue, Pauline ULiege; Delcenserie, Véronique ULiege; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege et al

Poster (2015, October)

Complex oligosaccharides from human milk (HMO) contribute to infant health. Bifidobacteriumbifidum mainly found in breast-fed infant microbiota has all the enzymatic machinery for degradation of HMO. On ... [more ▼]

Complex oligosaccharides from human milk (HMO) contribute to infant health. Bifidobacteriumbifidum mainly found in breast-fed infant microbiota has all the enzymatic machinery for degradation of HMO. On the other hand, whey is rich in complex bovin milk oligosaccharides (BMO) very similar to HMO, including 3’-sialyllactose (3’SL). They are very likely to be metabolised by B. bifidum too, but also by B. crudilactis, a bovine origin strain. Fermentation of HMO or BMO by bifidobacteria can result in production of metabolites modulating virulence expression of several pathogenic bacteria. Two strains of bifidobacteria were used in this study: B. bifidum, isolated from breastfed infant feces and B. crudilactis, isolated from bovine raw milk. The ability of those strains to metabolise culture media enriched in glucose, whey and 3’SL has been assessed. Then, the obtained culture supernatant has been tested against virulence genes expression of E. coli O157:H7.  Both strains were able to grow in presence of BMO and 3’SL. B. crudilactis presented the best growth on all media. All culture supernatants obtained after supplementation with 3’SL resulted in significant under-expression of genes ler and qseA. The trend of genes stxB2 and luxS was also toward a down-regulation. BMO combined to some bovine or human origin bifidobacteria strains could be interesting synbiotics to maintain or restore the intestinal health of young children. These effects observed in vitro require further investigations to ensure repeatability in humans and to identify the exact nature of molecules obtained from fermentation media by B. bifidum and B. crudilactis. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimisation de milieux de culture pour Bifidobacterium bifidum et Bifidobacterium crudilactis et étude de l’effet antimicrobien des surnageants de culture
Bondue, Pauline ULiege; Delcenserie, Véronique ULiege; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege et al

Poster (2015, June)

Modulé entre autre par notre alimentation, le microbiote intestinal influence notre santé. Un enfant allaité sera en meilleure santé qu’un enfant nourri avec des formulations commerciales. Ceci est ... [more ▼]

Modulé entre autre par notre alimentation, le microbiote intestinal influence notre santé. Un enfant allaité sera en meilleure santé qu’un enfant nourri avec des formulations commerciales. Ceci est notamment dû à la présence d’oligosaccharides complexes dans le lait maternel (HMO). Les oligosaccharides ajoutés au lait maternisé sont d’origine végétale et leur structure est très éloignée de celle des HMO. Parce que les HMO ressemblent aux glycans de la paroi épithéliale, les pathogènes intestinaux infantiles s’y fixent et sont expulsés naturellement. Le lait de vache possède des oligosaccharides complexes (BMO), dont la structure est très similaire à celle des HMO. Les bifidobactéries rencontrées majoritairement dans les matières fécales d’un nourrisson devraient pouvoir métaboliser les BMO, tout comme celles isolées dans le lait de vache. Les objectifs de cette étude étaient d’étudier le potentiel de croissance de bifidobactéries d’origine bovine ou humaine sur des milieux de culture enrichis en lactosérum et BMO. Le deuxième objectif était de vérifier si le catabolisme de ces sucres complexes induisaient une synthèse de métabolites influençant l’expression de virulence de certains pathogènes tels qu’Escherichia coli O157 :H7. Une souche de Bifidobacterium bifidum, isolée à partir des matières fécales d’un nourrisson exclusivement allaité et une souche de Bifidobacterium crudilactis, isolée à partir de fromage au lait cru, ont été mises en culture dans des milieux contenant différentes sources d’hydrates de carbone (glucose, lactosérum naturellement riche en lactose et BMO, et 3’-syalillactose (3’SL)). Le 3’SL est un oligosaccharide complexe majoritaire parmi les BMO. Les surnageants des différents milieux de culture ont été prélevés et concentrés par lyophilisation puis mis en contact avec E. coli O157 :H7. L’expression relative de différents gènes de virulence d’E. coli O157:H7, fliC, ler, stx2b et luxS a été étudiée. Dans le futur, les BMO et certaines souches d’origine bovine ou humaine pourraient s’avérer être des compléments alimentaires intéressants pour maintenir ou rétablir la santé intestinale des jeunes enfants. [less ▲]

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See detailShort communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments
Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULiege; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege; Leclercq, Mathilde et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2015), 98

Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products ... [more ▼]

Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis in sample D. In relation to 26S pyrosequencing, our study revealed the presence of 3 main yeast species: Naumovozymaspp., Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Kazachastania khefir. For Naumovozyma, further studies are needed to assess the isolation of new species. In conclusion, this study has proved that it is possible to establish the patterns of bacterial and yeast composition of kefir and kefir grain. This was only achieved with the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailProtected Designation of Origin Belgian cheese microbiota characterized using metagenomic analysis
Delcenserie, Véronique ULiege; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege; Delhalle, Laurent et al

Poster (2014, October 17)

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See detailMicrobiota characterization of a protected designation of origin Belgian cheese: Herve cheese, using metagenomic analysis.
Delcenserie, Véronique ULiege; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege; Delhalle, Laurent ULiege et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2014), 97

Herve cheese is a Belgian soft cheese with a washed rind, and is made from raw or pasteurized milk. The specific microbiota of this cheese has never previously been fully explored and the use of raw or ... [more ▼]

Herve cheese is a Belgian soft cheese with a washed rind, and is made from raw or pasteurized milk. The specific microbiota of this cheese has never previously been fully explored and the use of raw or pasteurized milk in addition to starters is assumed to affect the microbiota of the rind and the heart. The aim of the study was to analyze the bacterial microbiota of Herve cheese using classical microbiology and a metagenomic approach based on 16S ribosomal DNA pyrosequencing. Using classical microbiology, the total counts of bacteria were comparable for the 11 samples of tested raw and pasteurized milk cheeses, reaching almost 8 log cfu/g. Using the metagenomic approach, 207 different phylotypes were identified. The rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses was found to be highly diversified. However, 96.3 and 97.9% of the total microbiota of the raw milk and pasteurized cheese rind, respectively, were composed of species present in both types of cheese, such as Corynebacterium casei, Psychrobacter spp., Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Staphylococcus equorum, Vagococcus salmoninarum, and other species present at levels below 5%. Brevibacterium linens were present at low levels (0.5 and 1.6%, respectively) on the rind of both the raw and the pasteurized milk cheeses, even though this bacterium had been inoculated during the manufacturing process. Interestingly, Psychroflexus casei, also described as giving a red smear to Raclettetype cheese, was identified in small proportions in the composition of the rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses (0.17 and 0.5%, respectively). In the heart of the cheeses, the common species of bacteria reached more than 99%. The main species identified were Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Psychrobacter spp., and Staphylococcus equorum ssp. equorum. Interestingly, 93 phylotypes were present only in the raw milk cheeses and 29 only in the pasteurized milk cheeses, showing the high diversity of the microbiota. Corynebacterium casei and Enterococcus faecalis were more prevalent in the raw milk cheeses, whereas Psychrobacter celer was present in the pasteurized milk cheeses. However, this specific microbiota represented a low proportion of the cheese microbiota. This study demonstrated that Herve cheese microbiota is rich and that pasteurized milk cheeses are microbiologically very close to raw milk cheeses, probably due to the similar manufacturing process. The characterization of the microbiota of this particular protected designation of origin cheese was useful in enabling us to gain a better knowledge of the bacteria responsible for the character of this cheese. [less ▲]

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See detailProtected Designation of Origin Belgian cheese microbiota characterized using metagenomic analysis
Delcenserie, Véronique ULiege; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege; Delhalle, Laurent et al

Poster (2013, October 16)

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See detailUse of Argon for modified atmosphere packaging of blood sausage: impact on quality and growth of Listeria monocytogenes
Adolphe, Y.; Duval, P.; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege et al

Poster (2012, October 19)

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See detailUse of Argon for modified atmosphere packaging of blood sausage: impact on quality and growth of Listeria monocytogenes
Adolphe, Y.; Duval, P.; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege et al

Poster (2012, September 03)

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See detailLes modèles de microbiologie prévisionellepour la maitrise de la sécurité des aliments (synthèse bibliographique)
Delhalle, Laurent ULiege; Daube, Georges ULiege; Adolphe, Ysabelle ULiege et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement (2012), 16(3), 369-381

Predictive microbiology aims to predict the evolution of microorganisms in foods with mathematical models. Several models have been published and the complexity of some of them makes their use difficult ... [more ▼]

Predictive microbiology aims to predict the evolution of microorganisms in foods with mathematical models. Several models have been published and the complexity of some of them makes their use difficult for the uninitiated. However, the use of this discipline will become widespread in coming years. These models provide, for example, additional tools to ensure the microbiological safety of food, to establish the contamination flow in a food chain, to develop and to assist the quality assurance systems. The development of new computer software and database will enable stakeholders in the food chain to have a better control of microbiological hazards. The aim of this summary is to give an overview of existing models of predictive microbiology and their applications. A first approach of the primary, secondary and tertiary models is given. The modelling of latency, integrated models and growth tests are also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailAn effective Real-time Quantitative PCR protocol for quantification of pathogens in foodstuffs
Adolphe, Y.; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege; Duval, P. et al

Poster (2012, July 22)

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See detailMolecular effective quantification of pathogens and total flora in meat products
Adolphe, Ysabelle; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege; Delhalle, Laurent et al

Poster (2011, November 17)

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See detailMolecular effective quantification of pathogens and total flora in meat products
Adolphe, Y.; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege; Delhalle, Laurent et al

Poster (2011, September)

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See detailA new tool to control meat products safety: a web based application of predictive microbiology models
Delhalle, Laurent ULiege; Adolphe, Ysabelle ULiege; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULiege et al

Conference (2011)

Predictive microbiology is considered by the European legislation as a tool to control food safety. Meat and meat products are particularly sensitive to contamination with pathogens. However, development ... [more ▼]

Predictive microbiology is considered by the European legislation as a tool to control food safety. Meat and meat products are particularly sensitive to contamination with pathogens. However, development of predictive microbiology models and interpretation of results require specific knowledge. A free web based model has been developed for an easy use by people who are not experts in this field as industries and public authorities. The model can simulate the growth of Salmonella spp, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157 in minced pork meat and on pork meat product (white pudding) under different environmental conditions. The model provides simulations under static or dynamic conditions over time. The user also has the opportunity to import the specific growth rate and cardinal parameters of a bacterium. Unlike polynomial models currently available, this free web access model is distinguished by the use of secondary square roots and primary logistic model with delay. This model permits to have a real time process management, to prospect new formulation for safer products or to design safer processes, to estimate the shelf life of a food product, etc [less ▲]

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