References of "Coppieters, Wouter"
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See detailComplete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces lunaelactis MM109T, Isolated from Cave Moonmilk Deposits
Naomé, Aymeric ULiege; Maciejewska, Marta; Calusinska, Magdalena et al

in Genome Announcements (2018), 6(21), 00435-18

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See detailHigh resolution mapping of cross-over events in cattle using NGS data
Kadri, Naveen Kumar ULiege; Harland, Chad; Charlier, Carole ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production (2018, February 15)

High resolution mapping of cross-over events in cattle using NGS data Keywords: recombination, cattle, NGS Homologous recombination plays an important role in proper segregation of homologues in the first ... [more ▼]

High resolution mapping of cross-over events in cattle using NGS data Keywords: recombination, cattle, NGS Homologous recombination plays an important role in proper segregation of homologues in the first meiotic division. Failure in proper segregation results in aneuploidy, which is a leading cause for pregnancy loss in humans. Recently, global recombination rate has been studied in large cattle populations genotyped with SNP arrays ( 50K). However, the fine-scale resolution of these studies remained limited as a result of the relatively low marker density. Here we report high-resolution mapping of cross-over (CO) events in a cattle pedigree using whole genome sequence data. We carry out an extensive cleaning of our sequence data to remove errors (errors in the genome build, sequencing errors and presence of CNVs) that dramatically inflate CO counts. Using 5 million high quality sequence variants we identify 3,880 CO events in 155 male gametes and 3,088 CO events in 124 female gametes. The median resolution of the identified COs was 34 kb with about 70% of the events mapped to an interval less than 100 kb. The male and female map lengths were estimated at 27.5 M and 23.8 M respectively. Consistent with previous studies in cattle, we find higher recombination rate in males and higher frequency of COs at chromosome ends. Interestingly, compared to the map lengths estimated from SNP chip we find an increase of 3.7 and 2.7 M in male and female maps respectively. Despite the cleaning efforts, we cannot determine at this time whether the increased in map lengths correspond to CO missed with genotyping arrays, to spurious CO identified with NGS data (due to unidentified sources of errors) or both. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of Genes Associated With Monogenic Primary Immunodeficiency Identifies Rare Variants in XIAP in Patients With Crohn's Disease.
Amininejad, Leila; Charloteaux, Benoît ULiege; Theatre, Emilie ULiege et al

in Gastroenterology (2018), 154(8), 2165-2177

BACKGROUND & AIMS: A few rare monogenic primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation that resembles Crohn's disease (CD). We investigated whether 23 genes ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: A few rare monogenic primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation that resembles Crohn's disease (CD). We investigated whether 23 genes associated with 10 of these monogenic disorders contain common, low-frequency, or rare variants that increase risk for CD. METHODS: Common and low frequency variants in 1 Mb loci centered on the candidate genes were analyzed using meta-data corresponding to genotypes of approximately 17,000 patients with CD or without CD (controls) in Europe. The contribution of rare variants was assessed by high-throughput sequencing of 4750 individuals, including 660 early-onset and/or familial cases among the 2390 patients with CD. Variants were expressed from vectors in SW480 or HeLa cells and functions of their products were analyzed in immunofluorescence, luciferase, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblot assays. RESULTS: We reproduced the association of the interleukin 10 locus with CD (P = .007), although none of the significantly associated variants modified the coding sequence of interleukin 10. We found XIAP to be significantly enriched for rare coding mutations in patients with CD vs controls (P = .02). We identified 4 previously unreported missense variants associated with CD. Variants in XIAP cause the PID X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2, yet none of the carriers of these variants had all the clinical features of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2. Identified XIAP variants S123N, R233Q, and P257A were associated with an impaired activation of NOD2 signaling after muramyl dipeptide stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: In a systematic analysis of variants in 23 PID-associated genes, we confirmed the association of variants in XIAP with CD. Further screenings for CD-associated variants and analyses of their functions could increase our understanding of the relationship between PID-associated genes and CD pathogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation, Characterization, and Antibacterial Activity of Hard-to-Culture Actinobacteria from Cave Moonmilk Deposits
Adam, Delphine ULiege; Maciejewska, Marta; Naomé, Aymeric ULiege et al

in Antibiotics (2018), 7(2)(28), 1033907020028

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See detailGenome-wide Association Study of Acute Renal Graft Rejection.
Ghisdal, L.; Baron, C.; Lebranchu, Y. et al

in American Journal of Transplantation (2017), 17(1), 201-2019

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See detailA novel SMAD3 mutation caused multiple aneurysms in a patient without osteoarthritis symptoms
Courtois, Audrey ULiege; Coppieters, Wouter ULiege; BOURS, Vincent ULiege et al

in European Journal of Medical Genetics (2017)

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See detailNGS- based reverse genetic screen for common embryonic lethal mutations compromising fertility in livestock.
Charlier, Carole ULiege; Li, Wanbo; Harland, Chad ULiege et al

in Genome Research (2016), 26:1-9

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See detailSequence-based association analysis identifies coding and non-coding variants in HFM1, MLH3, MSH4, MSH5, RNF212 and RNF212B with large effects on male and female recombination rate in cattle
Kadri, Naveen Kumar ULiege; Harland, Chad ULiege; Faux, Pierre ULiege et al

Poster (2016, June 15)

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle populations from France, New-Zealand and the Netherlands. We identify 2,395,177 crossover (CO) events in sperm cells transmitted by 2,940 sires ... [more ▼]

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle populations from France, New-Zealand and the Netherlands. We identify 2,395,177 crossover (CO) events in sperm cells transmitted by 2,940 sires to 94,516 offspring, and 579,996 CO events in oocytes transmitted by 11,461 cows to 25,332 offspring. When measured in identical family structures, the average number of CO in males (23.3) was found to be larger than in females (21.4). The heritability of global recombination rate (GRR) was estimated at 0.13 in males and 0.08 in females. The genetic correlation was equal to 0.66, indicating that shared variants are influencing GRR in both genders. Haplotype-based genome-wide association studies revealed seven genome-wide significant QTL. Variants identified by next-generating sequencing in 5 Mb windows encompassing the QTL peaks were imputed in order to perform a sequence-based association analysis. For four QTLs, we identified missense mutations in genes known to be involved in meiotic recombination among the most significantly associated variants. Most of the identified mutations had significant effects in both genders with three of them accounting each for approximately 10% of the genetic variance in males (the allelic substitution effect being approximately equal to one additional CO per genome). Thus, a large fraction of the genetic variance is associated with missense mutations in genes known to be involved in meiotic recombination. Our results are very different from reports of recombination in other species. For instance, in human, recombination rate is higher in females, distinct variants affect recombination rate in males and females, and the genetic correlation is close to 0, whereas in cattle, we observed a higher recombination rate in males controlled by shared variants effective in both sexes. [less ▲]

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See detailHIGHER MALE THAN FEMALE RECOMBINATION RATE LARGELY CONTROLLED BY MISSENSE VARIANTS IN RNF212, MLH3, HFM1, MSH5 AND MSH4 IN CATTLE
Kadri, Naveen Kumar ULiege; Harland, Chad ULiege; Faux, Pierre ULiege et al

Poster (2016, May 11)

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle populations from France, New-Zealand and the Netherlands. We identify 2,395,177 crossover (CO) events in sperm cells transmitted by 2,940 sires ... [more ▼]

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle populations from France, New-Zealand and the Netherlands. We identify 2,395,177 crossover (CO) events in sperm cells transmitted by 2,940 sires to 94,516 offspring, and 579,996 CO events in oocytes transmitted by 11,461 cows to 25,332 offspring. When measured in identical family structures, the average number of CO in males (23.3) was found to be larger than in females (21.4). The heritability of global recombination rate (GRR) was estimated at 0.13 in males and 0.08 in females. The genetic correlation was equal to 0.66, indicating that shared variants are influencing GRR in both genders. Haplotype-based genome-wide association studies revealed seven genome-wide significant QTL. Variants identified by next-generating sequencing in 5 Mb windows encompassing the QTL peaks were imputed in order to perform a sequence-based association analysis. For four QTLs, we identified missense mutations in genes known to be involved in meiotic recombination among the most significantly associated variants. The P259S variant identified in RNF212 had already been reported, whereas missense mutations in MLH3 (N408S), HFM1 (S1189L), MSH5 (R631Q), MSH4 (C342Y) and a second in RNF212 (A77T) are new. Surprisingly, variants previously identified in REC8 were not associated with a QTL detected on BTA10 whereas variants in RNF212B, a paralog of RNF212, showed much stronger association with the phenotype in this region. This suggests that RNF212B might be involved in the recombination process. Most of the identified mutations had significant effects in both genders with three of them accounting each for approximately 10% of the genetic variance in males (the allelic substitution effect being approximately equal to one additional CO per genome). Thus, a large fraction of the genetic variance is associated with missense mutations in genes known to be involved in meiotic recombination. Our results are very different from reports of recombination in other species. For instance, in human, recombination rate is higher in females, distinct variants affect recombination rate in males and females, and the genetic correlation is close to 0, whereas in cattle, we observed a higher recombination rate in males controlled by shared variants effective in both sexes. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of dopaminergic genes on inhibitory processes and cognitive control.
Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; Muto, Vincenzo ULiege; Meyer, Christelle et al

Poster (2016, March 18)

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See detailCoding and noncoding variants in HFM1, MLH3, MSH4, MSH5, RNF212, and RNF212B affect recombination rate in cattle.
Kadri, Naveen Kumar ULiege; Harland, Chad ULiege; Faux, Pierre ULiege et al

in Genome Research (2016)

We herein study genetic recombination in three cattle populations from France, New Zealand, and the Netherlands. We identify 2,395,177 crossover (CO) events in 94,516 male gametes, and 579,996 CO events ... [more ▼]

We herein study genetic recombination in three cattle populations from France, New Zealand, and the Netherlands. We identify 2,395,177 crossover (CO) events in 94,516 male gametes, and 579,996 CO events in 25,332 female gametes. The average number of COs was found to be larger in males (23.3) than in females (21.4). The heritability of global recombination rate (GRR) was estimated at 0.13 in males and 0.08 in females, with a genetic correlation of 0.66 indicating that shared variants are influencing GRR in both sexes. A genome-wide association study identified seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) for GRR. Fine-mapping following sequence-based imputation in 14,401 animals pinpointed likely causative coding (5) and noncoding (1) variants in genes known to be involved in meiotic recombination (HFM1, MSH4, RNF212, MLH3, MSH5) for 5/7 QTL, and noncoding variants (3) in RNF212B for 1/7 QTL. This suggests that this RNF212 paralog might also be involved in recombination. Most of the identified mutations had significant effects in both sexes, with three of them each accounting for approximately 10% of the genetic variance in males. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-wide association study of acute renal graft rejection.
Ghisdal, L.; Baron, C.; Lebranchu, Y. et al

in American Journal of Transplantation (2016)

Acute renal rejection is a major risk factor for chronic allograft dysfunction and long-term graft loss. We performed a genome-wide association study to detect loci associated with biopsy-proven acute T ... [more ▼]

Acute renal rejection is a major risk factor for chronic allograft dysfunction and long-term graft loss. We performed a genome-wide association study to detect loci associated with biopsy-proven acute T cell-mediated rejection occurring in the first year after renal transplantation. In a discovery cohort of 4127 European renal allograft recipients transplanted in eight European centers, we used a DNA pooling approach to compare 275 cases and 503 controls, on Illumina 2.5 M arrays. In an independent replication cohort of 2765 patients transplanted in two European countries, we identified 313 cases and 531 controls, in whom we genotyped individually the most significant SNPs from the discovery cohort. In the discovery cohort, we found 5 candidate loci tagged by a number of contiguous SNPs (>5) that was never reached in iterative in silico permutations of our experimental data. In the replication cohort, two loci remained significantly associated with acute rejection in both univariate and multivariate analysis. One locus encompasses PTPRO, coding for a receptor-type tyrosine kinase essential for B cell receptor signalling. The other locus involves ciliary gene CCDC67, in line with the emerging concept of a shared building design between the immune synapse and the primary cilium. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA stop-gain in the laminin, alpha 3 gene causes recessive junctional epidermolysis bullosa in Belgian Blue cattle
Sartelet, Arnaud ULiege; Harland, Chad ULiege; Tamma, Nico ULiege et al

in Animal Genetics (2015), 46(5), 566-570

Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity ... [more ▼]

Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity mapping located the causative gene in a 8.3-Mb interval on bovine chromosome 24. Combining information from (i) whole-genome sequencing of an affected calf, (ii) transcriptomic data from a panel of tissues and (iii) a list of functionally ranked positional candidates pinpointed a private G to A nucleotide substitution in the LAMA3 gene that creates a premature stop codon (p.Arg2609*) in exon 60, truncating 22% of the corresponding protein. The LAMA3 gene encodes the alpha 3 subunit of the heterotrimeric laminin-332, a key constituent of the lamina lucida that is part of the skin basement membrane connecting epidermis and dermis layers. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in this gene are known to cause severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa in human, mice, horse, sheep and dog. Overall, our data strongly support the causality of the identified gene and mutation. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the use of the transmission disequilibrium test to detect pseudo-autosomal variants affecting traits with sex-limited expression
Elansary, Mahmoud ULiege; Stinckens, Anneleen; Ahariz, Naïma ULiege et al

in Animal Genetics (2015)

We herein describe the realization of a genome-wide association study for scrotal hernia and cryptorchidism in Norwegian and Belgian commercial pig populations. We have used the transmission ... [more ▼]

We herein describe the realization of a genome-wide association study for scrotal hernia and cryptorchidism in Norwegian and Belgian commercial pig populations. We have used the transmission disequilibrium test to avoid spurious associations due to population stratification. By doing so, we obtained genome-wide significant signals for both diseases with SNPs located in the pseudo-autosomal region in the vicinity of the pseudo-autosomal boundary. By further analyzing these signals, we demonstrate that the observed transmission disequilibria are artifactual. We determine that transmission bias at pseudo-autosomal markers will occur (i) when analyzing traits with sex-limited expression and (ii) when the allelic frequencies at the marker locus differ between X and Y chromosomes. We show that the bias is due to the fact that (i) sires will preferentially transmit the allele enriched on the Y (respectively X) chromosome to affected sons (respectively daughters) and (ii) dams will appear to preferentially transmit the allele enriched on the Y (respectively X) to affected sons (respectively daughters), as offspring inheriting the other allele are more likely to be non-informative. We define the conditions to mitigate these issues, namely by (i) extracting information from maternal meiosis only and (ii) ignoring trios for which sire and dam have the same heterozygous genotype. We show that by applying these rules to scrotal hernia and cryptorchidism, the pseudo-autosomal signals disappear, confirming their spurious nature. [less ▲]

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See detailPrioritizing likely causative genes in GWAS identified risk loci for immune-mediated inflammatory disorders using cell-type specific eQTL information.
Docampo Martínez, Elisa ULiege; Fang, Ming ULiege; Dmitrieva, Joelia Borisovna ULiege et al

Poster (2015, May 05)

Background/Purpose: Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders (IMIDs) share many genetic risk factors. Pleiotropy may exist at different levels and most of the underlying mechanisms are still to be uncovered ... [more ▼]

Background/Purpose: Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders (IMIDs) share many genetic risk factors. Pleiotropy may exist at different levels and most of the underlying mechanisms are still to be uncovered. GWAS have identified hundreds of risk loci for IMIDs but causative genes have been identified in only a handful of cases. Recent fine-mapping efforts indicate that only a minority of risk variants are coding. This suggests that most risk variants will be regulatory hence affecting disease risk via eQTL effects. Methods: To aid in the identification of causative genes for IMIDs, we generated transcriptome information (HT12 arrays) for six blood cell types (CD4, CD8, CD19, CD14, CD15 and platelets) and intestinal biopsies at three anatomical locations (ileum, colon, rectum) for 350 healthy Caucasians. The same individuals were genotyped with SNP arrays interrogating > 700K variants, augmented by imputation from the 1KG project. To detect cis-eQTL we tested variants within 0.5 megabase windows centered on the tested probe. The nominal p-value of the best SNP within a cis-window was Sidak-corrected for the window-specific number of independent tests. The corresponding best, Sidak-corrected p-values for each probe were jointly used to estimate their respective false discovery rate.To identify likely causative genes in GWAS identified risk loci variants and also better understand pleiotropic effects, we (i) developed a method that quantifies the correlation between “disease association pattern” (DAP) and “eQTL association pattern” (EAP) and provides an empirical estimate of its significance, and (ii) evaluated the effect of fitting known risk variants as covariates in the eQTL analysis following Nica et al. (2010). We applied both approaches to celiac disease (CE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the second one to type one diabetes (T1D), multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriasis (PSO). Results: We detected > 16000 significant cis-eQTL, with a degree of sharing between cell types ranging from 38 to 90% highlighting the utility of our multi-tissue panel. GWAS variants were drivers of ciseQTL effects across the different tissues in 399 tests (23.6%), mostly in CD4 cells, and pinpointing 64 new gene-disease associations (3.7%). The number of shared loci and shared eQTL were highly correlated (rho=0.66).RA and SLE showed the highest degree of sharing. Conclusions: We identified new potential candidate genes for IMIDs and characterized pleiotropic effects through ciseQTL mapping in GWAS loci. These findings could shed a light on IMIDs pathogenesis and co-occurrence. Latest results will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailHigher male than female recombination rate in cattle is controlled by genetic variants effective in both sexes
Kadri, Naveen Kumar ULiege; Harland, Chad ULiege; Coppieters, Wouter ULiege et al

Poster (2015, May 05)

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle populations from France, New-Zealand and the Netherlands. We apply a new phasing algorithm extracting familial information suited for large half ... [more ▼]

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle populations from France, New-Zealand and the Netherlands. We apply a new phasing algorithm extracting familial information suited for large half-sib families to reconstruct haplotypes and detect cross-overs (CO). The software is robust to genotyping and map errors. We identify more than 2,000,000 CO events in sperm cells transmitted by 3008 sires to 94,603 offspring, and more than 500,000 CO events in oocytes transmitted by 11,497 cows to 25,390 offspring. When measured in identical family structures, the average number of CO in males (24.0) was found to be larger than in females (21.8). In males, recombination rates were higher closer to telomeres whereas in females, recombination rates dropped at both centromeres and telomeres (probably as a result of lower informativity). The heritability of the global recombination rate (GRR) was close to 0.20 in males and to 0.08 in females. Genetic correlation ranged from 0.38 to 0.69 depending on the population, indicating that shared variants are influencing GRR in both genders. Haplotype-based genome-wide association studies revealed four genome-wide significant QTL, including two previously identified ones (involving REC8 and RNF212). For all QTLs, there was a positive correlation between haplotype effects across sexes, ranging from 0.35 to 0.68. We selected two reference panels of respectively 122 and 215 bulls sequenced at cover > 15x to impute variants in the New-Zealand and French populations. All variants identified by next-generating sequencing in 5 Mb windows encompassing the QTL peaks were imputed with Beagle in order to perform a sequence-based association study. For three QTLs, we identified missense mutations in genes known to be involved in meiosis among the most significantly associated variants. These variants were perfectly associated with the haplotypes underlying the QTL effects. The variant identified in RNF212 had already been reported, whereas missense mutations in MLH3 (N408S) and HFM1 (S1189L) are new findings. Surprisingly, variants previously identified in REC8 did not capture the QTL effect whereas variants in RNF212B, PPP1R3E, BCL2L2, HOMEZ and PABPN1 had much stronger association with the phenotype. The three missense mutations were significant in both genders with two of them accounting for approximately 10% of the genetic variance in males (the allelic substitution effect being approximately equal to one additional CO per genome). Our results are very different from reports of recombination in other species. For instance, in human, recombination rate is higher in females, distinct variants affect recombination rate in males and females and the genetic correlation is close to 0 whereas in cattle, we observed a higher recombination rate in males controlled by shared variants effective in both sexes. [less ▲]

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See detailX-Linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) due to microduplications of chromosome Xq26 : A new disorder and implications for acromegaly
Trivellin, G; Daly, AF; Faucz, FR et al

in Abstract book - ENDO 2015 (2015, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (10 ULiège)
See detailScanning the genome for QTL affecting the recombination process in the male and female cattle germline
Kadri, Naveen Kumar ULiege; Harland, Chad ULiege; Coppieters, Wouter ULiege et al

Poster (2015, February)

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle population from France, New-Zealand and The Netherlands. We apply a new phasing algorithm extracting familial information suited for large half ... [more ▼]

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle population from France, New-Zealand and The Netherlands. We apply a new phasing algorithm extracting familial information suited for large half-sib families to reconstruct haplotypes and detect cross-overs. The software is robust to genotyping errors and map errors (genome builts still contain errors for non-model organisms). We identify more than 2,000,000 cross-over events in sperm cells transmitted by 2942 sires to 94,049 offspring, and more than 500,000 cross-over events in oocytes transmitted by 10,943 cows to 23,850 offspring. The estimated number of cross-overs per gamete and its accuracy were influenced by the family structure (number of offsprings, parents and grand-parents genotyped). The average number of cross-overs in males (24.0) was larger than in females (21.8), even after correction for family structure. In males, recombination rates were higher closer to telomeres whereas in females, recombination rates dropped at both centromeres and telomeres (probably as a result of lower informativity). The heritability of the global recombination rate was close to 0.20 in males and to 0.10 in females and the genetic correlation was ~0.70, indicating that common genes are influencing both traits. Genome-wide association studies clearly confirmed QTL located close to REC8 and RNF212 in males. The QTL associated to REC8 was also detected in females and there was a positive correlation between QTL effects in males and females. The QTL associated to REC8 accounted for ~10% of the genetic variance in both males and females. [less ▲]

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