References of "Chapurlat, R"
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See detailSafety of oral non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in osteoarthritis: what does the literature say ?
Cooper, C.; Chapurlat, R.; Al-Daghri, N. et al

in Drugs and Aging (2019), 36(suppl 1), 15-24

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely recommended and prescribed to treat pain in osteoarthritis. While measured to have a moderate effect on pain in osteoarthritis, NSAIDs have been ... [more ▼]

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely recommended and prescribed to treat pain in osteoarthritis. While measured to have a moderate effect on pain in osteoarthritis, NSAIDs have been associated with wide-ranging adverse events affecting the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal systems. Gastrointestinal toxicity is found with all NSAIDs, which may be of particular concern when treating older patients with osteoarthritis, and gastric adverse events may be reduced by taking a concomitant gastroprotective agent, although intestinal adverse events are not ameliorated. Cardiovascular toxicity is associated with all NSAIDs to some extent and the degree of risk appears to be pharmacotherapy specific. An increased risk of acute myocardial infarction and heart failure is observed with all NSAIDs, while an elevated risk of hemorrhagic stroke appears to be restricted to the use of diclofenac and meloxicam. All NSAIDs have the potential to induce acute kidney injury, and patients with osteoarthritis with co-morbid conditions including hypertension, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus are at increased risk. Osteoarthritis is associated with excess mortality, which may be explained by reduced levels of physical activity owing to lower limb pain, presence of comorbid conditions, and the adverse effects of anti-osteoarthritis médications especially NSAIDs. This narrative review of recent literature identifies data on the safety of non-selective NSAIDs to better understand the risk:benefit of using NSAIDs to manage pain in osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel approach to estimate osteoarthritis progression: use of the reliable change index in the evaluation of joint space loss.
Parsons, C.; Judge, A.; Leyland, K. et al

in Arthritis Care and Research (2019), 71(2), 300-7

Objective: Osteoarthritis-related changes in joint space measurements over time are small and sensitive to measurement error. The Reliable Change (RC) index determines whether the magnitude of change ... [more ▼]

Objective: Osteoarthritis-related changes in joint space measurements over time are small and sensitive to measurement error. The Reliable Change (RC) index determines whether the magnitude of change observed in an individual can be attributed to true change. This study aimed to examine the RC index as a novel approach to estimating osteoarthritis progression. Methods: Data from 167 men and 392 women with knee osteoarthritis (diagnosed using the ACR criteria) randomised to the placebo arm of the 3-year Strontium Ranelate Efficacy in Knee Osteoarthritis triAl (SEKOIA) and assessed annually. The RC index was used to determine whether the magnitude of change in joint space width (JSW) on radiographs between study years was likely to be true or due to measurement error. Results: Between consecutive years, 57 to 69% of participants had an apparent (change less than 0) decrease in JSW, while 31% to 43% of participants had annual changes indicating improvement in JSW. The RC index identified decreases in JSW in only 6.0% between baseline and year 1 and 4.5% between the remaining study years. The apparent increases in JSW were almost eliminated between baseline and year 1, and between years 1 and 2 only 1.3% had a statistically significant increase, dropping to 0.9% between years 2 and 3. Conclusion: The RC index provides a method to identify change in JSW, removing many apparent changes that are likely to be due to measurement error. This method appears to be useful for assessing change in JSW in clinical and research settings from radiographs. Significance and Innovations: The aim of this research was to assess the effectiveness of the reliable change index as a novel approach to estimating OA progression, to date no studies have been identified that apply the RC index methodology within musculoskeletal research. Interestingly, the reliable change index provides a useful method to identify change in joint space width, removing many of the apparent changes that are likely to be due to measurement error. When compared to crude differences in joint space width measurements, implementation of the reliable change index dramatically reduced the proportions of study participants that were identified as having statically reliable change. This method appears to be useful for assessing change in JSW clinical and research settings from radiographs, and may have wider applications to other imaging modalities. [less ▲]

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See detailGuidelines for the conduct of pharmacological clinical trials in hand osteoarthritis: consensus of a working group of the ESCEO
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Arden, NK; Haugen, IK et al

in Osteoporosis International (2018, April), 29(Suppl1), 71-2

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See detailThe discriminative ability of SARQOL according to the definition of sarcopenia: The OFELY study
Sornay-Rendu, E; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Osteoporosis International (2018, April), 29(Suppl1), 61

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See detailA 24 months prospective, randomized, double-blind study to assess the effect of daily oral administration of 2g of strontium ranelate vs placebp on BMD in postmenpausal.
Felsenberg, D.; Chapurlat, R.; Rizzoli, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2018, April), 29 S1

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See detail10 years of denosumab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: results from the phase 3 randomised FREEDOM trial and open-label extension
Bone, H.G.; Wagman, R.B.; Brandi, M.L. et al

in Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology (2017), 5

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See detailNutrition and physical activity in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia: systematic review.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Dawson, A.; Shaw, S. C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(6), 1817-33

This systematic review summarizes the effect of combined exercise and nutrition intervention on muscle mass and muscle function. A total of 37 RCTs were identified. Results indicate that physical exercise ... [more ▼]

This systematic review summarizes the effect of combined exercise and nutrition intervention on muscle mass and muscle function. A total of 37 RCTs were identified. Results indicate that physical exercise has a positive impact on muscle mass and muscle function in subjects aged 65 years and older. However, any interactive effect of dietary supplementation appears to be limited. INTRODUCTION: In 2013, Denison et al. conducted a systematic review including 17 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to explore the effect of combined exercise and nutrition intervention to improve muscle mass, muscle strength, or physical performance in older people. They concluded that further studies were needed to provide evidence upon which public health and clinical recommendations could be based. The purpose of the present work was to update the prior systematic review and include studies published up to October 2015. METHODS: Using the electronic databases MEDLINE and EMBASE, we identified RCTs which assessed the combined effect of exercise training and nutritional supplementation on muscle strength, muscle mass, or physical performance in subjects aged 60 years and over. Study selection and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers. RESULTS: The search strategy identified 21 additional RCTs giving a total of 37 RCTs. Studies were heterogeneous in terms of protocols for physical exercise and dietary supplementation (proteins, essential amino acids, creatine, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbuthyrate, vitamin D, multi-nutrients, or other). In 79% of the studies (27/34 RCTs), muscle mass increased with exercise but an additional effect of nutrition was only found in 8 RCTs (23.5%). Muscle strength increased in 82.8% of the studies (29/35 RCTs) following exercise intervention, and dietary supplementation showed additional benefits in only a small number of studies (8/35 RCTS, 22.8%). Finally, the majority of studies showed an increase of physical performance following exercise intervention (26/28 RCTs, 92.8%) but interaction with nutrition supplementation was only found in 14.3% of these studies (4/28 RCTs). CONCLUSION: Physical exercise has a positive impact on muscle mass and muscle function in healthy subjects aged 60 years and older. The biggest effect of exercise intervention, of any type, has been seen on physical performance (gait speed, chair rising test, balance, SPPB test, etc.). We observed huge variations in regard to the dietary supplementation protocols. Based on the included studies, mainly performed on well-nourished subjects, the interactive effect of dietary supplementation on muscle function appears limited. [less ▲]

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See detailTen years of Denosumab (DMAB) treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Results from the FREEDOM Extension trial.
Bone, H.G.; Brandi, M.L.; Brown, J.P. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 135-136

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See detailHigh Kellgren-Lawrence Grade and Bone Marrow Lesions Predict Worsening Rates of Radiographic Joint Space Narrowing; The SEKOIA Study
Edwards, M.H.; Parsons, C.; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Journal of Rheumatology (2016), 43(3), 657-65

Objective. Determinants of radiographic progression in osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood. We investigated which features on baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acted as predictors of change ... [more ▼]

Objective. Determinants of radiographic progression in osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood. We investigated which features on baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acted as predictors of change in joint space width (JSW). Methods. A total of 559 men and women over the age of 50 years with clinical knee OA [Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade 2-3] were recruited to the placebo arm of the SEKOIA study (98 centers; 18 countries). Minimal tibiofemoral joint space and KL grade on plain radiograph of the knee were assessed at baseline and at yearly followup up to 3 years. In a subset, serial knee MRI examinations were performed. Individuals with a bone marrow lesion (BML) ≥ grade 2 at the tibiofemoral joint at baseline were classified as BML-positive. Relationships between change in JSW and risk factors were assessed using linear regression. Results. The mean age of study participants was 62.8 (SD 7.5) years and 73% were female; 38.6% had BML. Mean baseline JSW was 3.65 mm. This reduced by 0.18 (0.30) mm/year in men and 0.13 (0.23) mm/year in women. Those with BML had a significantly higher rate of annualized change in JSW; this relationship remained robust after adjustment for age, sex, and baseline KL grade [β = –0.10 (95% CI –0.18, –0.02) mm/yr]. Age, sex, baseline KL grade, and other MRI findings did not influence the rate of change in JSW. Conclusion. The rate of change in JSW was similar in men and women. BML on knee MRI predicted the rate of radiographic change in JSW. This relationship was independent of age, sex, and baseline KL grade. (First Release January 15 2016; J Rheumatol 2016;43:657–65; doi:10.3899/jrheum.150053) [less ▲]

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See detailTraitement par denosumab chez des hommes à masse osseuse basse: résultats à 24 mois de l'étude ADAMO
Chapurlat, R.; Langdahl, B.; Teglbjaerg, C. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2015, November), 82(S1), 123-124

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See detailDenosumab for the treatment of men with low bone mineral density: 24-month results from the Adamo Trial
Langdahl, B; Teglbjaerg, C; Ho, PR et al

in Endocrine Reviews (2014), 35(3), 22-1

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See detailStrontium ranelate decreases the number of rapid radiological progressors from the first year in SEKOIA study
Chevalier, X; Richette, P; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2014), 22(1), 461

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See detailRepublished: Value of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives.
Lotz, M.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Postgraduate Medical Journal (2014), 90(1061), 171-8

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the 'omics' (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailStrontium ranelate improves osteoarthritis symptoms compared to placebo in patients with knee OA: The SEKOIA study
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Richette, P; Bellamy, N et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013, April), 24(Suppl.1), 49-51

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: results of a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Badurski, J; Bellamy, N et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72(2), 179-86

BACKGROUND: Strontium ranelate is currently used for osteoporosis. The international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Strontium ranelate Efficacy in Knee OsteoarthrItis triAl evaluated its ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Strontium ranelate is currently used for osteoporosis. The international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Strontium ranelate Efficacy in Knee OsteoarthrItis triAl evaluated its effect on radiological progression of knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: Patients with knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3, and joint space width (JSW) 2.5-5 mm) were randomly allocated to strontium ranelate 1 g/day (n=558), 2 g/day (n=566) or placebo (n=559). The primary endpoint was radiographical change in JSW (medial tibiofemoral compartment) over 3 years versus placebo. Secondary endpoints included radiological progression, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and knee pain. The trial is registered (ISRCTN41323372). RESULTS: The intention-to-treat population included 1371 patients. Treatment with strontium ranelate was associated with smaller degradations in JSW than placebo (1 g/day: -0.23 (SD 0.56) mm; 2 g/day: -0.27 (SD 0.63) mm; placebo: -0.37 (SD 0.59) mm); treatment-placebo differences were 0.14 (SE 0.04), 95% CI 0.05 to 0.23, p<0.001 for 1 g/day and 0.10 (SE 0.04), 95% CI 0.02 to 0.19, p=0.018 for 2 g/day. Fewer radiological progressors were observed with strontium ranelate (p<0.001 and p=0.012 for 1 and 2 g/day). There were greater reductions in total WOMAC score (p=0.045), pain subscore (p=0.028), physical function subscore (p=0.099) and knee pain (p=0.065) with strontium ranelate 2 g/day. Strontium ranelate was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with strontium ranelate 1 and 2 g/day is associated with a significant effect on structure in patients with knee osteoarthritis, and a beneficial effect on symptoms for strontium ranelate 2 g/day. [less ▲]

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See detailLe ranélate de strontium diminue la proportion de patients progressant rapidement dès la première année : une analyse post hoc de l'étude SEKOIA
Chevalier, X; Richette, P; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2013), 80(S1), 59-60

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See detailWhat is the predictive value of MRI for the occurrence of knee replacement surgery in knee osteoarthritis?
Pelletier, J.-P.; Cooper, C.; Peterfy, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72(10), 1594-1604

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease ... [more ▼]

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs. MRI is a non-invasive alternative that provides comprehensive imaging of the whole joint. Frequently used MRI measurements in knee osteoarthritis are cartilage volume and thickness; others include synovitis, synovial fluid effusions, bone marrow lesions (BML) and meniscal damage. Joint replacement is considered a clinically relevant outcome in knee osteoarthritis; however, its utility in clinical trials is limited. An alternative is virtual knee replacement on the basis of symptoms and structural damage. MRI may prove to be a good alternative to radiography in definitions of knee replacement. One of the MRI parameters that predicts knee replacement is medial compartment cartilage volume/thickness, which correlates with radiographic joint space width, is sensitive to change, and predicts outcomes in a continuous manner. Other MRI parameters include BML and meniscal lesions. MRI appears to be a viable alternative to radiography for the evaluation of structural changes in knee osteoarthritis and prediction of joint replacement. [less ▲]

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See detailValue of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives.
Lotz, M.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the 'omics' (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailDenosumab treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for 6 years : results from the first 3 years of the freedom extension
Papapoulos, S; Brown, JP; Chapurlat, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 76

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See detailStructure modifying effects of strontium ranelate in knee osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Chapurlat, R; Christiaensen, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 58-59

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