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See detailPoints clés de la gestion clinique des cas de myopathie atypique
François, Anne-Christine ULiege; Renaud, Benoît ULiege; Cesarini Latorre, Carlota ULiege et al

in Pratique Vétérinaire Équine (2019), 201

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See detailComparison of faecal microbiota of horses suffering from atypical myopathy and healthy co-grazers
Cerri, Simona ULiege; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege; Votion, Dominique ULiege et al

Poster (2017, November 02)

Objectives: To characterize faecal microbiota of horses with atypical myopathy (AM) compared with healthy co-grazers (HcG). Methods: Fresh faecal samples were obtained from 6 horses (1 stallion, 3 ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To characterize faecal microbiota of horses with atypical myopathy (AM) compared with healthy co-grazers (HcG). Methods: Fresh faecal samples were obtained from 6 horses (1 stallion, 3 geldings and 2 females; mean age of 11.810 years) with confirmed AM and 6 HcG (4 geldings and 2 females; mean age of 13.68 years) during autumn-2016 and spring-2017 AM outbreaks in Belgium. Bacterial taxonomy profiling obtained by 16S amplicon sequencing of faeces was used to identify differentially distributed bacterial taxa between AM and HcG. Results were statistically compared using Welch's t-test with STAMP software. Results: A total of 90,407 sequences were analysed and clustered to 8,066 operational taxonomic units. Bacterial populations were distributed between 17 phylas, although 20% of sequences could not be attributed to an existing phylum. Horses with AM harboured a significantly higher relative abundance of Ruminococcaeae family with a significantly lower Lachnospiraceae when compared to HcG. Discussion: AM is caused by hypoglycin A intoxication, but only a part of horses pasturing in the same toxic environment develops the pathology, suggesting that there may be protective factors at the horse level. The results of this study show significant differences in faecal microbiota between AM cases and HcG, which could suggest that microbiota could play a role in the development or prevention of clinical disease. Conclusions: Results demonstrate that microbiota of AM affected horses is significantly different compared to HcG. Significance: Microbiome could influence the development of AM, but this role deserves further investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of faecal microbiota of horses suffering from atypical myopathy and healthy co-grazers.
Cerri, S.; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege; Votion, Dominique ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2017, October 13)

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See detailUse of a commercial high-fibre equine liquid diet for enteral tube feeding in horses: clinical experience in 9 cases.
Cesarini Latorre, Carlota ULiege; Cerri, Simona; Leroux, Aurélia et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2017), 31

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See detailLONG TERM PROGNOSIS OF MODERATE OR SEVERE LEFT-SIDED CARDIAC VALVULAR REGURGITATIONS IN HORSES
Leroux, Aurélia ULiege; Goudmaeker, Apolline; Fraipont, Audrey ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the 9th ECEIM Congress (2016, November)

Mitral and aortic regurgitations (MR and AR) are common in horses. Unlike mild valvular regurgitations, long-term prognosis of moderate or severe MR and AR is suspected to be guarded since they might ... [more ▼]

Mitral and aortic regurgitations (MR and AR) are common in horses. Unlike mild valvular regurgitations, long-term prognosis of moderate or severe MR and AR is suspected to be guarded since they might induce congestive heart failure (CHF). The aim of this study is to perform a long-term follow-up of horses with moderate or severe MR and/or AR to confirm this prognosis. Firstly medical files of horses with moderate or severe MR and/or AR that had a follow-up, were retrospectively reviewed over a 15-years period (2000-2015). Clinical and echocardiographic data of 25 horses with moderate or severe MR (16/25) or AR (8/25) or both (1/25) were considered. All horses had undergone 2 or more echocardiographic exams 6 months to 10 years apart. Eight horses developed CHF (4 MR and 4 AR) and all died/were euthanized. Diastolic left ventricular internal diameter, left atrial diameter and pulmonary artery diameter were/became above reference values in 17/25 horses but no significant difference was observed between the first and the follow-up measurements (Student's t-test, p<0.05). Secondly follow-up data of additional horses with moderate or severe MR was collected by telephone survey. Owners of 27 horses agreed to answer the survey 1 to 6 years after diagnosis. Ten horses with CHF had died, 3/27 had developed CHF, 10/27 had remained clinically stable and 4/27 had died of non-cardiac causes. Results of this study confirm that moderate or severe MR and AR carry a guarded to poor long-term prognosis as 40% (21/52) of the studied horses developed CHF. [less ▲]

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See detailCase report: Ovarian fibroma in a mare – Hormonal considerations
Ponthier, Jérôme ULiege; Salciccia, Alexandra ULiege; Parrilla Hernandez, Sonia ULiege et al

in Reproduction in Domestic Animals (2016, October 27), 51(supplement 2), 132

This report shows that, as in humans, AMH as well as steroids productions are low in case of ovarian fibroma, thus preserving normal cyclicity.

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See detailAssociation Between Necropsy Evidence of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation and Hemostatic Variables Before Death in Horses With Colic.
Cesarini Latorre, Carlota ULiege; Cotovio, M.; Rios, J. et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2016), 30(1), 269-75

BACKGROUND: Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is frequent in horses with severe gastrointestinal disorders. Postmortem studies have found fibrin microthrombi in tissues of these horses, but ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is frequent in horses with severe gastrointestinal disorders. Postmortem studies have found fibrin microthrombi in tissues of these horses, but studies relating these histopathological findings with antemortem hemostatic data are lacking. HYPOTHESIS: Antemortem classification of coagulopathy is related to the presence and severity of fibrin deposits observed postmortem in horses with severe gastrointestinal disorders. ANIMALS: Antemortem hemostatic profile data and postmortem tissue samples (kidney, lung, liver) from 48 horses with colic. METHODS: Tissue samples were stained with phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin and immunohistochemical methods for histological examination. A fibrin score (grades 0-4) was assigned for each technique, tissue and horse, as well as the presence or absence of DIC at postmortem examination. D-dimer concentration, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and antithrombin (AT) activity, as well as the clinicopathological evidence of coagulopathy, were determined from plasma samples collected 0-24 hours before death or euthanasia. Histologic and clinicopathologic data from the same horses were compared retrospectively. RESULTS: No association was found between antemortem classification of coagulopathy and postmortem diagnosis of DIC based on tissue fibrin deposition. None of the hemostatic parameters was significantly different between horses with or without postmortem diagnosis of DIC. There was no association between horses with fibrin in tissues or different cut-offs for D-dimer concentration and postmortem evidence of DIC. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Abnormalities of the routine clotting profile, including D-dimer concentration, were not useful in predicting histologic evidence of DIC at necropsy in horses with severe gastrointestinal disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailAcid base imbalances in ill neonatal foals and their association with survival.
Viu, J.; Armengou, L.; Rios, J. et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2015)

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Acid-base imbalances observed in human paediatric patients are associated with outcome. Likewise, neonatal foals may have different acid-base imbalances associated with ... [more ▼]

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Acid-base imbalances observed in human paediatric patients are associated with outcome. Likewise, neonatal foals may have different acid-base imbalances associated with diagnosis or prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To determine acid-base imbalances by the quantitative method in ill neonatal foals and to assess their association with diagnosis and prognosis. STUDY DESIGN: Observational prospective clinical study. METHODS: This study included 65 ill neonatal foals (32 septic, 33 non-septic) admitted to an equine referral hospital from 2005 to 2011with acid-base parameters determined on admission and a control group of 33 healthy neonatal foals. Blood pH, pCO2 , sodium, potassium, chloride, L-lactate, albumin and phosphate concentrations were determined. Bicarbonate, globulin, measured strong ion difference (SIDm ), non-volatile weak buffer concentrations (Atot ), base excess and its components were calculated. ANCOVA and multiple linear regression statistical analyses were performed. Results are summarised as mean +/- s.d. for normally distributed variables and median [25-75th percentiles] for non-normally distributed ones. RESULTS: Sixty-three per cent of ill foals had respiratory alkalosis and 58.5% had SIDm acidosis. The combination of both alterations was detected in 21 of 65 ill foals and abnormal pH was found in 24 of 65. Compared to healthy foals, ill foals had significantly lower SIDm (non-septic 31.6 +/- 6.3 (p<0.01) and septic 32.0 +/- 6.4 (p<0.01) vs. control 40.3 +/- 3.1 mmol/L), potassium (non-septic 3.5 [3.3-3.8] (p<0.01) and septic 3.6 [3.2-4.3] (p = 0.01) vs. control 4.2 [3.8-4.5] mEq/L) and higher L-lactate (non-septic 5.1 +/- 4.2 (p = 0.01) and septic 5.0 +/- 3.7 (p = 0.03) vs. control 2.5 +/- 1.3 mmol/L). Significantly higher L-lactate and venous pCO2 were found in non-surviving (6.4 +/- 3.5 mmol/L (p = 0.04) and 51 +/- 13 mmHg (p<0.01)) compared to surviving foals. CONCLUSIONS: The most common acid-base imbalances observed in ill foals were respiratory alkalosis, SIDm acidosis or mixed respiratory alkalosis with strong ion acidosis. Increased venous pCO2 and blood L-lactate concentration were associated with poor outcome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailParallel testing of plasma iron and fibrinogen concentrations to detect systemic inflammation in hospitalized horses.
Corradini, Ignacio; Armengou, Lara; Viu, Judit et al

in Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (2014), 24(4), 414-20

OBJECTIVES: To determine if plasma iron concentration is different between horses with and without systemic inflammation (SI) and to assess the accuracy for the detection of SI by assaying plasma iron and ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To determine if plasma iron concentration is different between horses with and without systemic inflammation (SI) and to assess the accuracy for the detection of SI by assaying plasma iron and fibrinogen concentrations, individually or combined. To assess the prognostic value of plasma iron concentration and to describe the progression of plasma iron and fibrinogen concentrations during hospital follow-up, and its relation to SI and survival. DESIGN: Prospective observational study evaluating plasma iron and fibrinogen. SETTING: University veterinary teaching hospital. ANIMALS: Equine patients greater than 30 days of age. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Plasma iron and fibrinogen concentration was prospectively determined in hospitalized horses. Horses were classified into 2 groups: SI and non-SI. Horses were also classified according to clinical outcome. A group of control healthy horses was also included. A total of 135 horses were included in the study. Plasma iron concentration was significantly lower and fibrinogen concentration was higher in the SI group. Nonsurvivors had a mean plasma fibrinogen concentration significantly higher than survivors. The combination of plasma iron and fibrinogen has a high degree of specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy for the detection of SI in horses. Follow-up measurements were obtained in 48 horses. Surviving horses normalized plasma iron concentration during follow-up examination whereas nonsurviving horses had persistently low plasma iron concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma iron concentration alone is an accurate marker of SI in hospitalized horses. Alteration of both plasma iron and fibrinogen concentrations improves the specificity and positive predictive value for diagnosis of SI. Alteration of either one of both increases sensitivity and negative predictive value. Surviving horses normalized plasma iron concentrations during follow-up period. The combination of plasma iron and fibrinogen concentrations may help in the detection of SI. Follow-up of plasma iron concentrations may provide useful prognostic information. [less ▲]

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See detailProgression of plasma D-dimer concentration and coagulopathies during hospitalization in horses with colic.
Cesarini Latorre, Carlota ULiege; Monreal, Luis; Armengou, Lara et al

in Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (2014), 24(6), 672-80

OBJECTIVE: To assess the progression of plasma D-dimer concentrations and coagulation status in horses with different types of colic. DESIGN: Prospective clinical observational study performed between ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess the progression of plasma D-dimer concentrations and coagulation status in horses with different types of colic. DESIGN: Prospective clinical observational study performed between March 2004 and September 2008. SETTING: Veterinary university teaching hospital. ANIMALS: Horses admitted and treated for colic and hospitalized for >48 hours were considered. Animals were classified by diagnosis into medical obstructive conditions (MO), surgical obstructive conditions (SO), inflammatory conditions, and ischemic lesions (IS). INTERVENTIONS: Three blood samples were obtained from each horse (admission, at 24-48 h [or after surgery] and upon discharge). For each sample, plasma D-dimer concentration, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, antithrombin activity, and the presence of subclinical disseminated intravascular coagulation were determined. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: When median plasma D-dimer concentration values at admission and after 24-48 hours were compared, they were different but stable in horses with MO (1.29-1.95 nmol/L) and inflammatory conditions (5.70-6.69 nmol/L). However, 10-fold and 5-fold increases were observed, respectively, in SO (2.08 to 16.38 nmol/L) and IS (3.08 to 15.91 nmol/L) in the postoperative period. By 24-48 hours, the percentage of horses with coagulopathy increased in most groups (MO, 43 to 58%; SO, 50 to 96%, IS, 53 to 90%). By the time of discharge, 87% of horses with SO problems and 89% of horses with IS still had some form of coagulopathy documented. CONCLUSIONS: Throughout hospitalization, horses with MO problems had less severe coagulopathy and lower plasmatic D-dimer concentrations compared to other groups of horses. On admission, most horses with inflammatory conditions presented with coagulopathy. At 24-48 hours of hospitalization and following surgery, the hemostatic profile can differ markedly when compared to admission values. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolic and endocrine profiles in sick neonatal foals are related to survival.
Armengou, L.; Jose-Cunilleras, E.; Rios, J. et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2013), 27(3), 567-75

BACKGROUND: Sick neonatal foals suffer from a variety of endocrine and metabolic derangements that may be related to outcome. There are several hepatic and lipid metabolism blood markers that have never ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Sick neonatal foals suffer from a variety of endocrine and metabolic derangements that may be related to outcome. There are several hepatic and lipid metabolism blood markers that have never been assessed in neonatal foals. OBJECTIVES: Assess panel of endocrine and metabolic variables in group of sick and healthy neonatal foals in order to describe their relationship with diagnosis and survival. ANIMALS: All neonatal foals referred to Unitat Equina-Fundacio Hospital Clinic Veterinari during 3 consecutive foaling seasons and a group of healthy foals. METHODS: Observational prospective study. Blood samples were obtained on admission and, when possible, after 24-48 h of hospitalization and immediately before discharge or death. Measured variables were triglycerides, nonsterified fatty acids, glucose, creatinine, urea, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), insulin, cortisol, bile acids, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). ACTH/cortisol and glucose/insulin ratios were calculated. RESULTS: Urea, creatinine, and cortisol had median concentrations in septic and nonseptic foals 2- to 8-fold higher than in the control group (P < .001). Median ACTH concentration in the septic group was approximately 4 times higher than in nonseptic and control foals (P < .001). ACTH/cortisol ratio was significantly lower in sick foals compared to control foals (P < .001). A score was designed including creatinine, GLDH, and cortisol. When >/= 2 of these variables were altered (P < .001), the foal had 32 times more risk of dying (OR, 31.7; 95% CI, 7.7-130.3). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Plasma creatinine, GLDH, and cortisol should be determined in sick newborn foals on admission because of their association with survival. [less ▲]

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See detailEnergy expenditure of critically ill neonatal foals.
Jose-Cunilleras, E.; Viu, J.; Corradini, I. et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2012), (41), 48-51

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Nutritional support in critically ill neonatal foals is of great importance given their high metabolic rate and minimal stores of energy and protein. Nutrient requirements of ... [more ▼]

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Nutritional support in critically ill neonatal foals is of great importance given their high metabolic rate and minimal stores of energy and protein. Nutrient requirements of healthy growing foals have been estimated based on daily milk intake; however, little is known about the resting energy expenditure (REE) of sick foals. OBJECTIVES: To determine REE in critically ill neonatal foals (sepsis and/or hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy [HIE] and compare this with REE in control foals. METHODS: Critically ill newborn foals admitted to the Fundacio Hospital Clinic Veterinari, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain from March 2009 to February 2011 were included in this study. Healthy neonatal foals and foals with nonsystemic conditions were used as controls. Oxygen consumption and CO2 production were measured with a respiratory monitor connected to a tight fitting facemask and REE (kcal/kg bwt/day) was calculated with the abbreviated Weir formula. Measurements were performed within 24 h of admission and repeatedly during hospitalisation. RESULTS: Twenty-seven foals were included (16 critically ill foals and 11 controls) and a total of 47 measurements were performed. In the critically ill, REE was reduced (mean +/- s.e. 49.5 +/- 2.1 kcal/kg bwt/day) on admission relative to the controls. In surviving foals (n = 5), REE before hospital discharge was not different (68.4 +/- 7.0 kcal/kg bwt/day) from control foals (64.8 +/- 2.7 kcal/kg bwt/day). CONCLUSIONS: REE was lower in critically ill foals upon admission (40-50 kcal/kg bwt/day) and normalised before hospital discharge (60-80 kcal/kg bwt/day). POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: Critically ill neonatal foals tolerating enteral feeding would receive approximately their REE when given 10% of their bodyweight in mare's milk daily. For sick neonates unable to tolerate enteral nutrition, provision of 50 kcal/kg bwt/day would be a reasonable goal for parenteral nutrition. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical findings in 10 foals with bacterial meningoencephalitis.
Viu, J.; Monreal, L.; Jose-Cunilleras, E. et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2012), (41), 100-4

REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: Bacterial meningoencephalitis is a severe complication in septic foals and there is scarce and often unclear information in the equine literature. OBJECTIVES: To report ... [more ▼]

REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: Bacterial meningoencephalitis is a severe complication in septic foals and there is scarce and often unclear information in the equine literature. OBJECTIVES: To report the most frequent clinical signs, clinicopathological findings, causative agents, treatments given and outcome of a group of foals with confirmed bacterial meningoencephalitis. METHODS: Foals aged < 6 months of age admitted to the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (2004-2009) with confirmed bacterial meningoencephalitis were retrospectively included in the study Diagnosis of bacterial meningoencephalitis was made by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture, CSF analysis consistent with bacterial infection, observation of bacteria in CSF cytology or postmortem confirmation. RESULTS: Nine neonates and one 5-month-old foal were included. The most frequently observed clinical signs were alterations in mental status (10/10), recumbency (8/10), weakness (8/10), abnormal pupillary light reflexes (6/10), decreased suckling-reflex (6/9), seizures and/or nystagmus (4/10). Common clinicopathological alterations included hyperfibrinogenaemia (8/9), hyperlactataemia (7/7), and neutropenia (5/10) or neutrophilia (5/10). Most neonates (8/9) developed bacterial meningoencephalitis despite having a sepsis score near the cut-off value (median = 12). On CSF analysis, pleocytosis (9/9), increased total protein concentration (5/6) and intracellular bacteria (6/9) were detected. The most frequently isolated bacterium was Escherichia coil. Once bacterial meningoencephalitis was diagnosed, antimicrobial therapy was switched to third and fourth generation cephalosporins. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis of bacterial meningoencephalitis is established based on CSF analysis and culture. Clinical recognition of bacterial meningoencephalitis is difficult and can be easily overlooked. Moreover, severe sepsis is not necessary to develop bacterial meningoencephalitis. POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: CSF analysis should be considered more often in sick newborn foals with signs indicative of central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology and culture would help to confirm or rule out unnoticed bacterial meningoencephalitis, and to choose appropriate antimicrobial therapy [less ▲]

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See detailBronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology and cytokine messenger ribonucleic Acid expression of racehorses with exercise intolerance and lower airway inflammation.
Lavoie, J. P.; Cesarini Latorre, Carlota ULiege; Lavoie-Lamoureux, A. et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2011), 25(2), 322-9

BACKGROUND: There is limited information relating bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology and cytokine messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression in racehorses with inflammatory airway disease (IAD ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: There is limited information relating bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology and cytokine messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression in racehorses with inflammatory airway disease (IAD). HYPOTHESIS AND OBJECTIVE: We hypothesize that cytokine expression in BAL cells would correlate with cytology. Thus, we evaluated the mRNA expression of selected cytokines in BAL cells in racehorses with exercise intolerance and lower airway inflammation. ANIMALS: Thirty-one client-owned Standardbred racehorses with exercise intolerance. METHODS: Prospective, observational study. Cells were obtained by BAL, and mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-4, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and interferon (IFN)-gamma was determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). RESULTS: Nine horses had normal BAL cell differential cytology (Controls), while 22 horses had evidence of IAD based on BAL fluid cytology. Relative expressions of TNF-alpha/glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; 0.0092 +/- 0.010 versus 0.0045 +/- 0.005, P= .034), IL-4/GAPDH (0.001 +/- 0.002 versus 0.0003 +/- 0.0003, P= .029), and IFN-gamma/GAPDH (0.0027 +/- 0.003 versus 0.0009 +/- 0.001, P= .028) were greater in horses with IAD compared with controls. Furthermore, IL-4/GAPDH (0.001 +/- 0.002 versus 0.0002 +/- 0.0003, P < .0001) and IFN-gamma/GAPDH (0.003 +/- 0.003 versus 0.001 +/- 0.001, P= .002) mRNA expression was increased in horses with increased metachromatic cell counts compared with horses with normal metachromatic cell counts. Only the mRNA expression of IL-1beta/GAPDH (1.1 +/- 0.7 versus 0.3 +/- 0.3, P= .045) was increased with airway neutrophilia. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Differences in gene expression were associated with the presence of IAD and with specific cell types present in airway secretions of Standardbred racehorses with poor performance. These findings suggest that different pathophysiological pathways are implicated in IAD. [less ▲]

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See detailCostochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals.
Cesarini Latorre, Carlota ULiege; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane et al

in Canadian Veterinary Journal (2011), 52(7), 772-7

The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of ... [more ▼]

The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. [less ▲]

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See detailPalatal sclerotherapy for the treatment of intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate in 51 standardbred racehorses.
Jean, Daniel; Picandet, Valerie; Celeste, Christophe et al

in Canadian Veterinary Journal (2011), 52(11), 1203-8

This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy and side effects of palatal sclerotherapy in standardbred racehorses suspected to have intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate (IDDSP). Fifty ... [more ▼]

This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy and side effects of palatal sclerotherapy in standardbred racehorses suspected to have intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate (IDDSP). Fifty-one horses were treated with multiple endoscopically guided injections of 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate in the soft palate. Two groups were identified: those that had respiratory noises during exercise (n = 27) and those that did not (n = 24). Treatment was well-tolerated. Furthermore, horses significantly reduced their racing times for the last 400 m compared with their times before treatment and even when their times were compared to the mean times for horses in the same race. In conclusion, palatal sclerotherapy appears to be a suitable alternative therapeutic option for horses suspected to have IDDSP. [less ▲]

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See detailUveal inflammation in septic newborn foals.
Leiva, M.; Pena, T.; Armengou, L. et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2010), 24(2), 391-7

BACKGROUND: Septicemia in humans is described as a leading cause of uveitis, which eventually can induce blindness. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: Uveal inflammatory findings could be related to sepsis severity ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Septicemia in humans is described as a leading cause of uveitis, which eventually can induce blindness. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: Uveal inflammatory findings could be related to sepsis severity in newborn foals and might be used as an indirect indicator for survival. ANIMALS: Seventy-four septic foals, 54 nonseptic foals, and 42 healthy foals. METHODS: Prospective observational clinical study. A detailed blinded, ophthalmic examination was performed by boarded ophthalmologists on all admitted newborn foals. Foals were grouped as septic (when blood culture resulted positive or the sepsis score was > or =14), nonseptic, and controls. Based on blood culture results, the septic group was subdivided into bacteremic and nonbacteremic foals. RESULTS: Blood culture was performed in 62/74 septic foals, from which 35 (56%) were bacteremic and 27 (44%) were non-bacteremic. Anterior uveitis was diagnosed in a significantly (P < .005) higher number of septic/bacteremic foals (14/35, 40%) than in septic/nonbacteremic foals (5/27, 19%), nonseptic foals (4/54, 7%), and control foals (0%). Anterior chamber fibrin was only observed in 4/14 (29%) septic/bacteremic foals with anterior uveitis. Anterior uveitis was also associated with posterior uveitis in 6/35 (19%) septic/bacteremic foals. The diagnosis of uveitis was related to nonsurvival (P = .001, odds ratio = 6.2, 95% confidence interval = 2.1-18.2). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Anterior uveitis is highly prevalent in septic newborn foals, especially in those with a positive blood culture, and it should be considered as a survival prognostic factor. [less ▲]

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