References of "Cayuela, Hugo"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDeterminants and Consequences of Dispersal in Vertebrates with Complex Life Cycles: A Review of Pond-Breeding Amphibians
Cayuela, Hugo; Valenzuela-Sánchez, Andrés; Teulier, Loïc et al

in Quarterly Review of Biology (2020), 95(1), 1-36

Dispersal is a central process in ecology and evolution. It strongly influences the dynamics of spatially structured populations and affects evolutionary processes by shaping patterns of gene flow. For ... [more ▼]

Dispersal is a central process in ecology and evolution. It strongly influences the dynamics of spatially structured populations and affects evolutionary processes by shaping patterns of gene flow. For these reasons, dispersal has received considerable attention from ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and conservationists. Although it has been studied extensively in taxa such as birds and mammals, much less is known about dispersal in vertebrates with complex life cycles such as pond-breeding amphibians. Over the past two decades, researchers have taken an ever-increasing interest in amphibian dispersal and initiated both basic and applied studies, using a broad range of experimental and observational approaches. This body of research reveals complex dispersal patterns, causations, and syndromes, with dramatic consequences for the demography and genetics of amphibian populations. In this review, our goals are to: redefine and clarify the concept of amphibian dispersal; review current knowledge about the effects of individual (i.e., condition-dependent dispersal) and environmental (i.e., context-dependent dispersal) factors during the three stages of dispersal (i.e., emigration, transience, and immigration); identify the demographic and genetic consequences of dispersal in spatially structured amphibian populations; and propose new research avenues to extend our understanding of amphibian dispersal. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailConservation ecology of crested newts : high site infidelity in a network of small ponds
Denoël, Mathieu ULiege; Cayuela, Hugo

Conference (2019, September 03)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSurvival cost to relocation does not reduce population self‐sustainability in an amphibian
Cayuela, Hugo; Gillet, Lilly; Laudelout, Arnaud et al

in Ecological Applications (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDispersal and alternative breeding site fidelity strategies in an amphibian
Denoël, Mathieu ULiege; Dalleur, séverine; Langrand, Estelle et al

in Ecography (2018), 41(9), 1543-1555

Dispersal (i.e., movement from a natal or breeding site to another breeding site) is a central process in ecology and evolution as it affects the eco-evolutionary dynamics of spatially structured ... [more ▼]

Dispersal (i.e., movement from a natal or breeding site to another breeding site) is a central process in ecology and evolution as it affects the eco-evolutionary dynamics of spatially structured populations. Dispersal evolution is regulated by the balance between costs and benefits, which is influenced by the individual phenotype (i.e., phenotype-dependent dispersal) and environmental factors (i.e., condition-dependent dispersal). Even though these processes have been extensively studied in species with simple life cycles, our knowledge about these mechanisms in organisms displaying complex life cycles remains fragmentary. In fact, little is specifically known about how the interplay between individual and environmental factors may lead to alternative dispersal strategies that, in turn, lead to the coexistence of contrasted site fidelity phenotypes. In this paper, we examined breeding dispersal in a pond-breeding amphibian, the great crested newt (Triturus cristatus), within usual walking distances for a newt. We took advantage of recent developments in multi-event capture-recapture models and used capture-recapture data (946 newts marked) collected in a spatially structured population occupying a large pond network (73 ponds). We showed a high rate of breeding site infidelity (i.e., pond use) and the coexistence of two dispersal phenotypes, namely, a highly pond faithful phenotype and a dispersing phenotype. Individuals that were site faithful at time t-1 were therefore more likely to remain site faithful at time t. Our results also demonstrated that the probability that individuals belong to one or the other dispersal phenotypes depended on environmental and individual factors. In particular, we highlighted the existence of a dispersal syndrome implying a covariation pattern among dispersal behavior, body size, and survival. Our work opens new research prospects in the evolution of dispersal in organisms displaying complex life cycles and raises interesting questions about the evolutionary pathways that contribute to the diversification of movement strategies in the wild. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 238 (51 ULiège)
See detailDes chars et des mares : écologie d’une population de Tritons crêtés au sein d’un réseau de points d’eau d’un site natura2mil
Denoël, Mathieu ULiege; Dalleur, Séverine; Hanoy, Mylène et al

Conference (2018, February 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (1 ULiège)