References of "Brédart, Serge"
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See detailThe Impact of Fatigue on Proper Name Retrieval
Vanootighem, Valentine ULiege; Dupont, Manuel ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

Poster (2019, March 09)

Forgetting people’s names in one of the most frequent memory complaints for older adults. Names have been showed to be more difficult to recall than conceptual biographical information about people such ... [more ▼]

Forgetting people’s names in one of the most frequent memory complaints for older adults. Names have been showed to be more difficult to recall than conceptual biographical information about people such as the person’s profession or nationality, or even more specific, unique, pieces of information. Given this particular vulnerability of proper name retrieval, the present study evaluated whether cognitive fatigue impacted the retrieval of people’s names more strongly than the retrieval of biographical information about people. We found that the retrieval of people's names was affected by time on task whereas the retrieval of conceptual biographical information about people's identity was not affected. This is new evidence of the particular fragility of proper name retrieval. [less ▲]

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See detailBelief in memories may be relinquished as often for adulthood as for childhood events, but for different reasons
Vanootighem, Valentine ULiege; Moyse, Evelyne ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Memory (2019), 27(5), 705-713

The age distribution of nonbelieved memories (NBMs) reported by young and older adults typically reflects a large proportion of events dated to childhood. The present study aimed to further investigate ... [more ▼]

The age distribution of nonbelieved memories (NBMs) reported by young and older adults typically reflects a large proportion of events dated to childhood. The present study aimed to further investigate the age of origin of NBMs by using instructions that include an NBM related to adulthood. Participants aged from 40 to 80 years were asked to describe an NBM, to explain why they had stopped believing their memory, and to rate its phenomenal characteristics. Participants also described and rated an age-matched believed memory (BM). The results revealed a similar proportion of nonbelieved events experienced in childhood and adulthood, thus calling into question the hypothesis that NBMs are mainly related to childhood events. We also found that NBMs might emerge for different reasons depending on the time of events. Additional analyses indicated that, overall, the influence of temporal distance on the ratings of phenomenal characteristics was similar for BMs and NBMs. [less ▲]

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See detailWhich Information Helps Resolve Recall Failures for Familiar People's Names?
Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Advances in Cognitive Psychology (2018), 14(4), 160-166

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See detailWhich information helps resolve face naming failures?
Brédart, Serge ULiege

Conference (2018, August 30)

Personal names are particularly susceptible to retrieval failures. In the present talk, a review of studies describing people’s spontaneous strategies for resolving failures in face naming, as well as ... [more ▼]

Personal names are particularly susceptible to retrieval failures. In the present talk, a review of studies describing people’s spontaneous strategies for resolving failures in face naming, as well as laboratory studies of experimentally-induced resolution of name recall failures are presented. This review indicates that, on the one hand, people frequently use spontaneous strategies based on a mental search for additional structural (facial appearance), semantic (biographical details) and contextual information (e.g. the context of first encounter) about the target person. On the other hand, both cueing and priming experimental studies have shown that providing phonological information may help resolve a name recall failure, whereas providing structural or semantic information is usually not helpful. A possible explanation of the spontaneous use of semantic/contextual information despite the uselessness of this kind of information will be discussed. It is proposed that 1) people’s metacognitive knowledge about the resolution of face naming failures is inaccurate; and 2) this inadequate knowledge perpetuates via a wrong inference process about the cause of naming failures resolution. [less ▲]

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See detailNonbelieved memories may occur as frequently for adulthood as for childhood events
Vanootighem, Valentine ULiege; Moyse, Evelyne ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

Poster (2018, August 30)

The phenomenon through which an autobiographical memory is no longer believed to be a representation of an event that really happened, despite a vivid recollection of the event, has been termed a ... [more ▼]

The phenomenon through which an autobiographical memory is no longer believed to be a representation of an event that really happened, despite a vivid recollection of the event, has been termed a nonbelieved memory (NBM). The age distribution of NBMs reported by young and older adults typically reflects a large proportion of events dated to childhood. The present study aimed to further investigate the age of origin of NBMs through the use of instructions that include an NBM related to adulthood. Participants aged from 40 to 80 years were asked to describe an NBM, why they had stopped believing their memory and to rate its phenomenal characteristics. Participants also described and rated an age-matched believed memory (BM). The results revealed a similar proportion of nonbelieved events experienced in childhood and adulthood, thus calling into question the hypothesis that NBMs are mainly related to childhood events. We also found that NBMs might emerge for different reasons depending on the time of events. Additional analyses indicated that, overall, the influence of temporal distance on the ratings of phenomenal characteristics was similar for BMs and NBMs. [less ▲]

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See detailAn own-name effect on person memory in twins
Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Names: A Journal of Onomastics (2018), 66(1), 47-53

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See detailThe cognitive psychology and neuroscience of naming people
Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews (2017), 83

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See detailFace description abilities predict line-up performance
Vanootighem, Valentine ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege; Dehon, Hedwige ULiege

Poster (2017, August 31)

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See detailDo nonbelieved memories typically refer to childhood memories?
Vanootighem, Valentine ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

Conference (2017, May 31)

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See detailAutoréférence et mémoire
Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Encyclopaedia Universalis (en ligne) (2017)

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See detailMirror efficiency in the assessment of visual pursuit in patients in minimally conscious state.
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Laureys, Steven ULiege et al

in Brain Injury (2017)

OBJECTIVE: Visual pursuit should be tested with a mirror in patients with disorders of consciousness. This stimulus was indeed more efficient than a person or an object, and the auto-referential aspect ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Visual pursuit should be tested with a mirror in patients with disorders of consciousness. This stimulus was indeed more efficient than a person or an object, and the auto-referential aspect was supposed to be the key feature. The present study tested the hypothesis that the mirror was more efficient because of its self-aspect. METHODS: The mirror was compared (1) to the patient's picture and to the picture of a famous face, in 22 patients in minimally conscious state and (2) to the patient's picture and a fake mirror, which had dynamical and bright aspects of the mirror, without reflecting the face, in 26 other patients in minimally conscious state. RESULTS: The mirror was more efficient than the patient's picture, which was not statistically different from the famous face. The second part of the study confirmed the statistical difference between the mirror and the picture. However, the fake mirror was neither statistically different from the mirror nor from the picture. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the hypothesis proposed by previous studies was partly wrong, they confirm that the mirror is the best stimulus to use when assessing visual pursuit. [less ▲]

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See detailThe verbal overshadowing effect in children and adults is unrelated to the specific content of descriptions
Vanootighem, Valentine ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege; Dehon, Hedwige ULiege

Poster (2016, July 21)

Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in children and adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect” (VOE, Schooler and ... [more ▼]

Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in children and adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect” (VOE, Schooler and Engstler-Schooler, 1990). The present study thoroughly examined the person descriptive abilities of 7–8, 10–11, and 13–14-year-old children and adults and their influence on later identification performance. Our aim was to specifically assess the prediction of the “content” account suggesting that a verbal overshadowing arises because participants generate an inadequate verbal description and later rely upon it during retrieval. Results showed a verbal overshadowing effect in all age groups but neither accuracy, length nor content of descriptions were found to be associated with identification accuracy. [less ▲]

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See detailNonbelieved memories in middle-aged and older adults
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Bouffier, Marion ULiege

in Consciousness and Cognition (2016), 42(2), 352-357

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See detailNames and cognitive psychology
Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Hough, C (Ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Names and Naming (2016)

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See detailSimilarities between the target and the intruder in naturally occurring repeated person naming errors
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Dardenne, Benoît ULiege

in Frontiers in Psychology (2015), 6(art 1474),

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See detailImpairment of age estimation from faces in Alzheimer’s disease
Moyse, Evelyne ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (2015), 45

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See detailAre you sure this was your own idea?
Beaufort, Aline ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege; Dehon, Hedwige ULiege

Poster (2014, July)

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See detailTrouble de la reconnaissance de soi chez des personnes atteintes de la maladie d'Alzheimer
Moyse, Evelyne ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

Poster (2014, June 12)

Introduction : Outre des difficultés de mémoire épisodique, la maladie d’Alzheimer est associée à une altération progressive du fonctionnement de la mémoire sémantique où les connaissances du passé ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Outre des difficultés de mémoire épisodique, la maladie d’Alzheimer est associée à une altération progressive du fonctionnement de la mémoire sémantique où les connaissances du passé lointain sont mieux préservées que les connaissances acquises récemment. De plus, il a été rapporté que ce type de perte peut aussi se produire pour la reconnaissance de son propre visage. Une étude décrivait le cas d’une femme atteinte de la maladie d’Alzheimer à un stade avancé qui était incapable de se reconnaître sur des photographies prises dans un passé récent mais qui avait peu voire pas de difficultés à se reconnaître sur des photographies prises pendant les deux premières décennies de sa vie adulte. Cependant, la description d’une seule étude de cas pourrait être vue comme anecdotique. Objectifs : L’objectif de cette étude est d’évaluer si ce type de difficultés peut s’observer dans un plus large échantillon de patients. Pour ce faire, des patients à des stades légers à modérés de la maladie sont comparés à des sujets âgés sains sur une tâche de reconnaissance de visages (soi, familier, inconnu) appartenant à différentes périodes de vie (20 ans jusqu’à récemment). Résultats : Au stade léger, les patients présentaient des difficultés uniquement pour reconnaître le visage d’une personne familière alors qu’au stade modéré de la maladie, ces difficultés s’observaient à la fois pour le visage familier et le propre visage. De plus, comparés aux sujets âgés sains, les patients modérés avaient des difficultés pour se reconnaître sur des photos récentes, alors qu’aucune différence n’était observée pour les autres périodes de vie. Par contre, aucune différence entre les patients légers et leurs sujets contrôles n’était observée selon l’âge des visages. Par ailleurs, l’analyse des temps de réaction montraient que ces deux groupes de participants étaient plus lents pour reconnaître les photos anciennes par rapport aux photos récentes. Conclusion : La présente étude révèle que les difficultés de reconnaissance des visages évoluent avec l’avancement de la maladie, avec des difficultés qui touchent uniquement la reconnaissance de visages familiers au stade léger de la maladie mais qui s’étendent au propre visage au stade modéré. De plus, une perte graduée dans le temps de la reconnaissance de soi est observée chez les patients modérés (moindre reconnaissance de son visage récent) mais pas chez les patients légers. Au contraire, un ralentissement de la reconnaissance des photos anciennes par rapport aux photos récentes était constaté chez les patients légers ainsi que chez leurs sujets contrôles. Deux hypothèses sont avancées pour expliquer ce phénomène. Premièrement, les photos anciennes provoqueraient une réaction de surprise et par là, augmenteraient le temps de réponse. La seconde hypothèse postule plutôt une difficulté d’accès aux représentations antérieures de soi et de son proche. [less ▲]

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