References of "Bouillon, S"
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See detailHuman Impacts on ecosystem health and resources of Lake Edward (HIPE): the phytoplankton study
Stoyneva-Gärtner, MP; Descy, J-P; Morana, Cédric ULiege et al

Conference (2018, September 25)

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See detailA comprehensive biogeochemical record and annual flux estimates for the Sabaki River (Kenya)
Marwick, T. R.; Tamooh, F.; Ogwoka, B. et al

in Biogeosciences (2018), 15(6), 1683--1700

Inland waters impart considerable influence on nutrient cycling and budget estimates across local, regional and global scales, whilst anthropogenic pressures, such as rising populations and the ... [more ▼]

Inland waters impart considerable influence on nutrient cycling and budget estimates across local, regional and global scales, whilst anthropogenic pressures, such as rising populations and the appropriation of land and water resources, are undoubtedly modulating the flux of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) between terrestrial biomes to inland waters, and the subsequent flux of these nutrients to the marine and atmospheric domains. Here, we present a 2-year biogeochemical record (October 2011–December 2013) at biweekly sampling resolution for the lower Sabaki River, Kenya, and provide estimates for suspended sediment and nutrient export fluxes from the lower Sabaki River under pre-dam conditions, and in light of the approved construction of the Thwake Multipurpose Dam on its upper reaches (Athi River). Erratic seasonal variation was typical for most parameters, with generally poor correlation between discharge and material concentrations, and stable isotope values of C (δ13C) and N (δ15N). Although high total suspended matter (TSM) concentrations are reported here (up to ∼ 3.8 g L−1), peak concentrations of TSM rarely coincided with peak discharge. The contribution of particulate organic C (POC) to the TSM pool indicates a wide biannual variation in suspended sediment load from OC poor (0.3 %) to OC rich (14.9 %), with the highest %POC occurring when discharge is < 100 m3 s−1 and at lower TSM concentrations. The consistent 15N enrichment of the particulate nitrogen (PN) pool compared to other river systems indicates anthropogenic N loading is a year-round driver of N export from the Sabaki Basin. The lower Sabaki River was consistently oversaturated in dissolved methane (CH4; from 499 to 135 111 %) and nitrous oxide (N2O; 100 to 463 %) relative to atmospheric concentrations. Wet season flows (October–December and March–May) carried > 80 % of the total load for TSM (∼ 86 %), POC (∼ 89 %), dissolved organic carbon (DOC; ∼ 81 %), PN (∼ 89 %) and particulate phosphorus (TPP; ∼ 82 %), with > 50 % of each fraction exported during the long wet season (March–May). Our estimated sediment yield (85 Mg km−2 yr−1) is relatively low on the global scale and is considerably less than the recently reported average sediment yield of ∼ 630 Mg km−2 yr−1 for African river basins. Regardless, sediment and OC yields were all at least equivalent or greater than reported yields for the neighbouring dammed Tana River. Rapid pulses of heavily 13C-enriched POC coincided with peak concentrations of PN, ammonium, CH4 and low dissolved oxygen saturation, suggesting that large mammalian herbivores (e.g. hippopotami) may mediate the delivery of C4 organic matter to the river during the dry season. Given recent projections for increasing dissolved nutrient export from African rivers, as well as the planned damming of the Athi River, these first estimates of material fluxes from the Sabaki River provide base-line data for future research initiatives assessing anthropogenic perturbation of the Sabaki Basin. [less ▲]

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See detailSeasonal and inter-annual variations in carbon fluxes in a tropical river system (Tana River, Kenya)
Geeraert, N; Omengo, FO; Tamooh, F et al

in Aquatic Sciences (2018), 80:19

The hydrological status of river systems is expected to change due to dam operations and climate change. This will affect the riverine fluxes of sediment and carbon (C). In rivers with strong seasonal and ... [more ▼]

The hydrological status of river systems is expected to change due to dam operations and climate change. This will affect the riverine fluxes of sediment and carbon (C). In rivers with strong seasonal and inter-annual variability, quantification and extrapolation of sediment and C fluxes can be a challenge as measurement periods are often too short to cover all hydrological conditions. We studied the dynamics of the Tana River (Kenya) from 2012 to 2014 through daily monitoring of sediment concentrations at three sites (Garissa, Tana River Primate Reserve and Garsen) and daily monitoring of C concentrations in Garissa and Garsen during three distinct seasons. A bootstrap method was applied to calculate the range of sediment and C fluxes as a function of annual discharge by using daily discharge data (1942–2014). Overall, we estimated that on average, sediment and carbon were retained in this 600 km long river section between Garissa to Garsen over the 73 years (i.e., fluxes were higher at the upstream site than downstream): integration over all simulations resulted in an average net retention of sediment (~ 2.9 Mt year− 1), POC (~ 18,000 tC year− 1), DOC (~ 920 tC year− 1) and DIC (~ 1200 tC year− 1). To assess the impact of hydrological variations, we constructed four different hydrological scenarios over the same period. Although there was significant non-linearity and difference between the C species, our estimates generally predicted a net increase of C retention between the upstream and downstream site when the annual discharge would decrease, for example caused by an increase of irrigation with reservoir water. When simulating an increase in the annual discharge, e.g. as a potential effect of climate change, we predicted a decrease in C retention. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon dynamics and CO2 and CH4 outgassing in the Mekong delta
Borges, Alberto ULiege; Abril, G.; Bouillon, S.

in Biogeosciences (2018), 15(4), 1093--1114

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See detailEffects of agricultural land use on fluvial carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide concentrations in a large European river, the Meuse (Belgium)
Borges, Alberto ULiege; Darchambeau, François ULiege; Lambert, Thibault ULiege et al

in Science of the Total Environment (2018), 610–611

We report a data-set of CO2, CH4, and N2O concentrations in the surface waters of the Meuse river network in Belgium, obtained during four surveys covering 50 stations (summer 2013 and late winter 2013 ... [more ▼]

We report a data-set of CO2, CH4, and N2O concentrations in the surface waters of the Meuse river network in Belgium, obtained during four surveys covering 50 stations (summer 2013 and late winter 2013, 2014 and 2015), from yearly cycles in four rivers of variable size and catchment land cover, and from 111 groundwater samples. Surface waters of the Meuse river network were over-saturated in CO2, CH4, N2O with respect to atmospheric equilibrium, acting as sources of these greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, although the dissolved gases also showed marked seasonal and spatial variations. Seasonal variations were related to changes in freshwater discharge following the hydrological cycle, with highest concentrations of CO2, CH4, N2O during low water owing to a longer water residence time and lower currents (i.e. lower gas transfer velocities), both contributing to the accumulation of gases in the water column, combined with higher temperatures favourable to microbial processes. Inter-annual differences of discharge also led to differences in CH4 and N2O that were higher in years with prolonged low water periods. Spatial variations were mostly due to differences in land cover over the catchments, with systems dominated by agriculture (croplands and pastures) having higher CO2, CH4, N2O levels than forested systems. This seemed to be related to higher levels of dissolved and particulate organic matter, as well as dissolved inorganic nitrogen in agriculture dominated systems compared to forested ones. Groundwater had very low CH4 concentrations in the shallow and unconfined aquifers (mostly fractured limestones) of the Meuse basin, hence, should not contribute significantly to the high CH4 levels in surface riverine waters. Owing to high dissolved concentrations, groundwater could potentially transfer important quantities of CO2 and N2O to surface waters of the Meuse basin, although this hypothesis remains to be tested. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon and nutrients sources and transformation in the River Sabaki, Kenya
Tamooh, FT; Shawlet, C; Borges, Alberto ULiege et al

Poster (2017, October 30)

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See detailLandscape and hydrological controls on the downstream transport of dissolved organic matter in the Congo and Zambezi rivers
Lambert, T; Bouillon, S; Teodoru, CR et al

Conference (2017, August 20)

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See detailThaw pond dynamics and carbon emissions in a Siberian lowland tundra landscape
Van Huissteden, J.; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Dean, J. et al

Poster (2017, April 25)

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See detailShifts in the carbon dynamics in a tropical lowland river system (Tana River, Kenya) during flooded and non-flooded conditions
Geeraert, N.; Omengo, F. O.; Borges, Alberto ULiege et al

in Biogeochemistry (2017), 132(1-2), 141-163

Rivers transport sediment and carbon (C) from the continents to the ocean, whereby the magnitude and timing of these fluxes depend on the hydrological regime. We studied the sediment and carbon dynamics ... [more ▼]

Rivers transport sediment and carbon (C) from the continents to the ocean, whereby the magnitude and timing of these fluxes depend on the hydrological regime. We studied the sediment and carbon dynamics of a tropical river system at two sites along the lower Tana River (Kenya), separated by a 385 km stretch characterized by extensive floodplains, to understand how the river regime affects within-river C processing as well as the C exchange between floodplain and river. Sampling took place during three different wet seasons (2012–2014), with extensive flooding during one of the campaigns. We measured the suspended sediment concentration, the concentration and stable isotope signature of three different carbon species (particulate and dissolved organic carbon, POC and DOC, and dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC) and other auxiliary parameters. During non-flooded conditions, the total C flux was dominated by POC (57–72%) and there was a downstream decrease of the total C flux. DIC was dominating during the flooded season (56–67%) and the flux of DIC and DOC coming from the inundated floodplains resulted in a downstream increase of the total carbon flux. Our data allowed us to construct a conceptual framework for the C dynamics in river systems, whereby nine major fluxes were identified. The application of this framework highlighted the dominance of POC during non-flooded conditions and the significant CO2 emissions during the flooded season. Furthermore, it identified the exchange of POC with the floodplain as an important factor to close the C budget of the river. © 2017, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. [less ▲]

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See detailCalibration of hydroclimate proxies in freshwater bivalve shells from Central and West Africa
Kelemen, Z.; Gillikin, D. P.; Graniero, L. E. et al

in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2017), 208

Freshwater bivalve shell oxygen and carbon stable isotope ratios (δ18O, δ13C) may act as recorders of hydroclimate (e.g., precipitation-evaporation balance, discharge) and aquatic biogeochemistry. We ... [more ▼]

Freshwater bivalve shell oxygen and carbon stable isotope ratios (δ18O, δ13C) may act as recorders of hydroclimate (e.g., precipitation-evaporation balance, discharge) and aquatic biogeochemistry. We investigate the potential of these hydroclimate proxies measured along the growth axis of shells collected from the Oubangui River (Bangui, Central African Republic) and the Niger River (Niamey, Niger). Biweekly water samples and in situ measurements collected over several years, along with daily discharge data from both sites allowed a direct comparison with proxies recorded in the shells. Data from a total of 14 unionid shells, including three species (Chambardia wissmanni, Aspatharia dahomeyensis, and Aspatharia chaiziana), confirmed that shells precipitate carbonate in oxygen isotope equilibrium with ambient water. Because water temperature variations were small, shell δ18O values (δ18Oshell) also accurately record the seasonality and the range observed in water δ18O (δ18Ow) values when calculated using an average temperature. Calculated δ18Owvalues were in good agreement over the entire record of measured δ18Owvalues, thus δ18Oshellrecords can be reliably used to reconstruct past δ18Owvalues. Discharge and δ18Owvalues from both rivers fit a logarithmic relationship, which was used to attempt reconstruction of past hydrological conditions, after calculating δ18Owvalues from δ18Oshellvalues. A comparison with measured discharge data suggests that for the two rivers considered, δ18Oshelldata are good proxies for recording discharge conditions during low(er) discharge levels, but that high discharge values cannot be accurately reconstructed due to the large scatter in the discharge-δ18Owrelationship. Moreover, periods of bivalve shell growth cessation due to high turbidity or air exposure should be taken into account. While δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in both rivers showed clear seasonality and correlated well with discharge, most of the shells analyzed did not record these variations adequately, likely due to the complication of vital effects including the variable contribution of metabolic CO2. Thus, tropical African unionid δ18Oshellvalues can be used to reconstruct δ18Owvalues with high confidence to provide insight on past hydroclimate such as precipitation-evaporation balance and periods of low discharge. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd [less ▲]

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See detailHIPE: Human impacts on ecosystem health and resources of Lake Edward; exploring a poorly known ichthyofaunal
Decru, E; Van Steenberge, M; Bouillon, S et al

Poster (2016, December 16)

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See detailShift in the chemical composition of dissolved organic matter in the Congo River network
Lambert, Thibault ULiege; Bouillon, S.; Darchambeau, François ULiege et al

in Biogeosciences (2016), 13(18), 5405-5420

The processing of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) during downstream transport in fluvial networks is poorly understood. Here, we report a dataset of dissolved organic carbon (DOC ... [more ▼]

The processing of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) during downstream transport in fluvial networks is poorly understood. Here, we report a dataset of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and DOM composition (stable carbon isotope ratios, absorption and fluorescence properties) acquired along a 1700 km transect in the middle reach of the Congo River Basin. Samples were collected in the mainstem and its tributaries during high water (HW) and falling water (FW) periods. DOC concentrations and DOM composition along the mainstem were found to differ between the two periods, because of a reduced lateral mixing between the central water masses of the Congo River and DOM-rich waters from tributaries and also likely because of a greater photodegradation during FW as water residence time (WRT) increased. Although the Cuvette Centrale wetland (one of the world’s largest flooded forest) continuously releases highly aromatic DOM in streams and rivers of the Congo Basin, the downstream transport of DOM was found to result in an along stream gradient from aromatic to aliphatic compounds. The characterization of DOM through parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) suggests that this transition results from (1) the losses of aromatic compounds by photodegradation and (2) the production of aliphatic compounds by biological reworking of terrestrial DOM. Finally, this study highlights the critical importance of the river-floodplain connectivity in tropical rivers in controlling DOM biogeochemistry at large spatial scale and suggests that the degree of DOM processing during downstream transport is a function of landscape characteristics and WRT [less ▲]

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See detailAlong-stream transport and transformation of dissolved organic matter in a large tropical river
Lambert, Thibault ULiege; Teodoru, C. R.; Nyoni, F. C. et al

in Biogeosciences (2016), 13(9), 2727--2741

Large rivers transport considerable amounts of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the ocean. However, downstream gradients and temporal variability in DOM fluxes and characteristics are poorly ... [more ▼]

Large rivers transport considerable amounts of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the ocean. However, downstream gradients and temporal variability in DOM fluxes and characteristics are poorly studied at the scale of large river basins, especially in tropical areas. Here, we report longitudinal patterns in DOM content and composition based on absorbance and fluorescence measurements along the Zambezi River and its main tributary, the Kafue River, during two hydrological seasons. During high-flow periods, a greater proportion of aromatic and humic DOM was mobilized along rivers due to the hydrological connectivity with wetlands, while low-flow periods were characterized by lower DOM content of less aromaticity resulting from loss of connectivity with wetlands, more efficient degradation of terrestrial DOM and enhanced autochthonous productivity. Changes in water residence time due to contrasting water discharge were found to modulate the fate of DOM along the river continuum. Thus, high water discharge promotes the transport of terrestrial DOM downstream relative to its degradation, while low water discharge enhances the degradation of DOM during its transport. The longitudinal evolution of DOM was also strongly impacted by a hydrological buffering effect in large reservoirs in which the seasonal variability of DOM fluxes and composition was strongly reduced. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatial variability and temporal dynamics of greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4, N2O) concentrations and fluxes along the Zambezi River mainstem and major tributaries
Nyoni; Nyambe, IA; Teodoru, CR et al

Conference (2015, November 02)

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See detailNeodymium isotope constraints on past hydrological variability in the Congo Basin
Bayon, G; Schefuss, E; Dupont, L et al

Conference (2015, October 26)

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See detailDivergent biophysical controls of aquatic CO2 and CH4 in the World’s two largest rivers
Borges, Alberto ULiege; Abril, G; Darchambeau, François ULiege et al

in Scientific Reports (2015), 5

Carbon emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters are globally significant and mainly occur at tropical latitudes. However, processes controlling the intensity of CO2 and CH4 emissions from tropical ... [more ▼]

Carbon emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters are globally significant and mainly occur at tropical latitudes. However, processes controlling the intensity of CO2 and CH4 emissions from tropical inland waters remain poorly understood. Here, we report a data-set of concurrent measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and dissolved CH4 concentrations in the Amazon (n = 136) and the Congo (n = 280) Rivers. The pCO2 values in the Amazon mainstem were significantly higher than in the Congo, contrasting with CH4 concentrations that were higher in the Congo than in the Amazon. Large-scale patterns in pCO2 across different lowland tropical basins can be apprehended with a relatively simple statistical model related to the extent of wetlands within the basin, showing that, in addition to non-flooded vegetation, wetlands also contribute to CO2 in river channels. On the other hand, dynamics of dissolved CH4 in river channels are less straightforward to predict, and are related to the way hydrology modulates the connectivity between wetlands and river channels. [less ▲]

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See detailPhytoplankton abundance and diversity in the Congo river at high and low waters
Stoyneva, MP; Descy, JP; Bouillon, S et al

Conference (2015, July 05)

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See detailOrganic and inorganic carbon fluxes in a tropical river system (Tana River, Kenya) during contrasting wet seasons
Geeraert, N; Omengo, FO; Bouillon, S et al

Poster (2015, April 12)

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See detailInorhanic and organic carbon spatial variability in the Congo River during high waters (December 2013) and low waters (June 2014)
Borges, Alberto ULiege; Bouillon, S; Teodoru, C et al

Conference (2015, February 23)

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