References of "Bolla, Monica"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHabituation of evoked responses is greater in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine than in controls: a contrast with the common forms of migraine.
Hansen, Jacob Moller; Bolla, Monica; Magis, Delphine ULiege et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2011)

Background: Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare, dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with transient hemiplegia during the aura phase. Mutations in at least three different genes can produce ... [more ▼]

Background: Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare, dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with transient hemiplegia during the aura phase. Mutations in at least three different genes can produce the FHM phenotype. The mutated FHM genes code for ion transport proteins that animal and cellular studies have associated with disturbed ion homeostasis, altered cellular excitability, neurotransmitter release, and decreased threshold for cortical spreading depression. The common forms of migraine are characterized interictally by a habituation deficit of cortical and subcortical evoked responses that has been attributed to neuronal dysexcitability. FHM and the common forms of migraine are thought to belong to a spectrum of migraine phenotypes with similar pathophysiology, and we therefore examined whether an abnormal habituation pattern would also be found in FHM patients. Methods: In a group of genotyped FHM patients (five FHM-1, four FHM-2), we measured habituation of visual evoked potentials (VEP), auditory evoked potentials including intensity dependence (IDAP), the nociception-specific blink reflex (nsBR) and compared the results to a group of healthy volunteers (HV). Results: FHM patients had a more pronounced habituation during VEP (P = 0.025) and nsBR recordings (P = 0.023) than HV. There was no difference for IDAP, but the slope tended to be steeper in FHM. Conclusion: Contrary to the common forms of migraine, FHM patients are not characterized by a deficient, but rather by an increased habituation in cortical/brain stem evoked activities. These results suggest differences between FHM and the common forms of migraine, as far as central neuronal processing is concerned. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrevalence of patent foramen ovale and MRI white matter lesions in migraine with aura
Schoenen, Jean ULiege; Magis, Delphine ULiege; Fumal, Arnaud ULiege et al

in Cephalalgia (2007, June), 27(6), 577-578

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOccipital nerve stimulation for drug-resistant chronic cluster headache: a prospective pilot study
Magis, Delphine ULiege; Allena, Marta; Bolla, Monica et al

in Lancet Neurology (2007), 6(4), 314-321

Background Drug-resistant chronic duster headache (drCCH) is a devastating disorder for which various destructive procedures have been tried unsuccessfully. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) is a new ... [more ▼]

Background Drug-resistant chronic duster headache (drCCH) is a devastating disorder for which various destructive procedures have been tried unsuccessfully. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) is a new, safe strategy for intractable headaches. We undertook a prospective pilot trial of ONS in drCCH to assess clinical efficacy and pain perception. Methods Eight patients with drCCH had a suboccipital neurostimulator implanted on the side of the headache and were asked to record details of frequency, intensity, and symptomatic treatment for their attacks in a diary before and after Continuous ONS. To detect changes in cephalic and extracephalic pain processing we measured electrical and pressure pain thresholds and the nociceptive blink reflex. Findings Two patients were pain free after a follow-up of 16 and 22 months; one of them still had occasional autonomic attacks. Three patients had around a 90% reduction in attack frequency. Two patients, one of whom had had the implant for only 3 months, had improvement of around 40%. Mean follow-up was 15.1 months (SD 9.5, range 3-22). Intensity of attacks tends to decrease earlier than frequency during ONS and, on average, is improved by 50% in remaining attacks. All but one patient were able to substantially reduce their preventive drug treatment. Interruption of ONS by switching off the stimulator or because of an empty battery was followed within days by recurrence and increase of attacks in all improved patients. ONS did not significantly modify pain thresholds. The amplitude of the nociceptive blink reflex increased with longer durations of ONS. There were no serious adverse events. Interpretation ONS could be an efficient treatment for drCCH and could be safer than deep hypothalamic stimulation. The delay of 2 months or more between implantation and significant clinical improvement suggests that the procedure ads via slow neuromodulatory processes at the level of upper brain stem or diencephalic centres. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMigraine and epilepsy: two of a kind ?
Schoenen, Jean ULiege; Bolla, Monica

in K-opinions (2007), 3

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULiège)