References of "Ben Kaab, Sofiène"
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See detailRosmarinus officinalis essential oil as an effective antifungal and herbicidal agent
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; Bettaieb Rebey, Iness ULiege; Hanafi, Marwa ULiege et al

in Spanish Journal of Agricultural Research (2019)

In order to reduce the use of chemical pesticides, great interest has been focused on environment-friendly biological control agents and botanicals that preserve biodiversity. In this context, our study ... [more ▼]

In order to reduce the use of chemical pesticides, great interest has been focused on environment-friendly biological control agents and botanicals that preserve biodiversity. In this context, our study aimed to assess the antifungal and herbicidal activities of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil (EO) to find an alternative to synthetic pesticides. The chemical composition of R. officinalis essential oil was determined by gaz chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS). Results showed that R. officinallis EO was rich in monoterpenes and the major constituents were 1,8-cineole (54.6%), camphor (12.27%) and α-pinene (7.09%). However, under laboratory condition, two tests were carried out. The first one consisted on the study of EO antifungal activity using ELISA microplates and the second one consisted on evaluating the effect of EO on seedling growth of weeds. It was confirmed that this EO significantly inhibits spore germination of Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium culmorum, Penicillium italicum and at 6 mM, the percentage of inhibition reached 100% on Fusarium oxysporum. Indeed, EO slows down seedling growth of Trifolium incarnatum, Silybum marianum, and Phalaris minor. In fact, EO at 5 mM completely inhibits seed germination. On the other hand, another experiment was carried out to evaluate the herbicidal activity by spraying EO on weeds. This showed that a novel herbicide formulation was set up for the first time to improve the activity of R. officinalis EO on post-emergence. Overall, R. officinalis EO can be suggested as a potential eco-friendly pesticide and suitable source of natural compounds potentially usable as natural pesticides. [less ▲]

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See detailBioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of Pimpinella anisum L. accessions at different ripening stages
Bettaieb Rebey, Iness; Aidi Wannes, Wissem; Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege et al

in Scientia Horticulturae (2019), 246

Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of four aniseed populations (Egyptian, Serbian, Tunisian and Turkish) were investigated during three developmental stages. The highest oil yield was achieved ... [more ▼]

Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of four aniseed populations (Egyptian, Serbian, Tunisian and Turkish) were investigated during three developmental stages. The highest oil yield was achieved at full maturity in all aniseed accessions ranged from 11.93% (Serbia) to 13.80% (Tunisia). Fatty acid profile of aniseed oil was characterized by high proportions of palmitic (4.90–57.18%) and petroselinic (10.48–46.60%) acids which had an antagonist evolution during maturation. The essential oil yield reached its maximum at the beginning of ripening process in all aniseed accessions ranged from 1.94% (Serbia) to 3.09% (Tunisia). The main essential oil compound was trans-anethole (66.34–93.05%) during aniseed ripening in all accessions. Phenolic content patronized its maximum at the last stage of aniseed ripening ranged from 17.11 mg GAE/g DW (Serbia) to 25.16 mg GAE/g DW (Tunisia). The main phenolic compound of aniseed was naringin (17.55–32.49%) and its accumulation was followed by the reduction of gallic, rosmarinic, ellargic and syringic acids during aniseed ripening in all accessions. Concerning antioxidant activity, DPPH scavenging activity, chelating ability and reducing power were maximal at full maturity in all aniseed accessions. Our findings indicate that the determination of optimal periods and provenances for antioxidant accumulation can be used to evaluate the quality of aniseeds and could be important for industries. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of Tunisian plant extracts as bioherbicide
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; Rebey Bettaieb, Ines; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege et al

Conference (2018, May 22)

Weeds constantly compete with crops for water and nutrient resources reducing yield, quality and consequently causing huge economic losses (Araniti et al., 2015) that can rise up to 34% in major crops ... [more ▼]

Weeds constantly compete with crops for water and nutrient resources reducing yield, quality and consequently causing huge economic losses (Araniti et al., 2015) that can rise up to 34% in major crops (Jabran et al., 2015). Actually, the current trend is to find a biological product to minimize the perceived impacts from synthetic herbicides in agriculture production (Sbai et al., 2016). In this context, the herbicidal activity of ten crude different extracts obtained from aerial parts of Tunisian spontaneous plants was determined on post-emergence at 7.5, 20 and 34 g/L against Trifolium incanatum, sylibum marianum and Phalaris minor. Aerial plant materials were grounded and macerated with methanol for 24H. Methanol was then eliminated using a rotavapor. The yield of plant extracts varied between 5.29% and 29.71 % following the species. Extracts 6, 8, and 3 exhibit the best activity in terms of visual effect by spraying on weeds. Moreover, a formulation was carried out to improve their efficiency. The results showed that formulated E6 has completely punctured Trifolium incanatum and has inhibited growth of Phalaris minor and Sylibum marianum. A fractionation of E6 was then carried out. Five fractions were obtained and tested on Trifolium incanatum. Among these fractions, F2 formulated at 20 g/L showed a very similar effect to a commercial bioherbicide. It caused the total death of Trifolium incanatum 9 days after spraying. Based on bioassay-guided fractionation, five compounds were identified which can be employed in developing new types of bioherbicides for controlling weeds on crops. In addition, the strong weed suppressive ability of formulated F2 therefore offers interesting possibilities as an effective natural environment-friendly approach for weed management. [less ▲]

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See detailEssential oil of Tunisian plant: biopesticide applied in agricultural system
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; ksouri, riadh; Jijakli, Haissam ULiege

Conference (2017, May 23)

The use of plant-derived products in postharvest disease management may be a valid alternative to conventional chemical treatments (Pane et al., 2016). Unfavorable environmental conditions (such as salt ... [more ▼]

The use of plant-derived products in postharvest disease management may be a valid alternative to conventional chemical treatments (Pane et al., 2016). Unfavorable environmental conditions (such as salt and drought) increase production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, Tunisian plants have developed adaptive responses including the synthesis of specific bioactive molecules used for medical and nutritional purposes (Ksouri et al., 2012). In that context, the main objective of the present study was the identification of essential oils from Tunisian plants against the important plant pathogens, particularly in Europe. The study began with the selection of endemic medicinal plant suspected to present antimicrobial properties. The essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger type apparatus (with a yield of 1.2%). The chemical composition of the essential oil obtained by hydro-distillation from the aerial parts was analyzed by GC/MS. Therefore, antifungal activity was evaluated against Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium italicum, using ELISA microplates with a blocked randomized design, as described previously (Kouassi et al., 2012). In addition, the essential oil was then tested for their herbicidal activities in pre-emergence and post-emergence assays against three weeds species. The chromatographic analysis showed a complex mixture where twenty compounds were identified accounting for 98.75 % of the total oil. Monoterpenes was represented by 71.73 %. The dominant monoterpenes are α Pinene (7.09%), 1,8-Cineole (54.6%) and Camphor (12.27%). Essential oil reduced significantly spores germination in a dose-dependent manner. Their fungistatic activity reached 100% at 0.6% against Fusarium oxysporum . In the dose response bioassay, the essential oil reduced seed germination rate of Phalaris minor, Sylibum marianum and Trifolium incanatum. Seedling growth was measured by shoot and root lengths at day 7. At 0.5%, essential oil reduced 100% seed germination. Post-emergence bioassays consisted in spraying essential oil at 3 concentrations (0.75, 2 and 3.4 %) at 2 leaves stage of three weeds species. Pelargonic acid was used as commercial positive control at 3.4%. At 0.75% and 2%, the essential oil do not show any sign of injury. However, only at 3.4 %, the spraying of essential oil showed visible injury ranging from wilting (after 1 day) and chlorosis (after 3 day) on Trifolium incanatum and Phalaris minor. After formulation, to enhance the distribution, the coverage and the penetration of the active molecules, the essential oil presented a high herbicidal activity. In conclusion, this work allowed to open new perspectives on the application of Tunisian essential oil as Novel biocontrol strategies against damageable plant pathogens and weeds. [less ▲]

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See detailExtremophile plants as source of biopesticides against European damageable plant pathogens
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; Parisi, Olivier ULiege; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege et al

Poster (2016, September 14)

The use of plant-derived products in postharvest disease management may be a valid alternative to conventional chemical treatments (Pane et al., 2016). Unfavorable environmental conditions (such as salt ... [more ▼]

The use of plant-derived products in postharvest disease management may be a valid alternative to conventional chemical treatments (Pane et al., 2016). Unfavorable environmental conditions (such as salt and drought) increase production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, extremophile plants have developed adaptive responses including the synthesis of specific bioactive molecules used for medical and nutritional purposes (Ksouri et al., 2012). In that context, the main objective of the present study was the identification of effective plant extracts and essential oils from extremophile plants against the most important plant pathogens in Europe (in term of loss, treatment necessity and/or cost). The study began with the selection of four endemic medicinal species suspected to be antimicrobial due to their wealth of phenolic and terpene compounds, such as flavonoids, phenolic acids, and coumarins (Ksouri et al., 2012). Each of the aerial plant materials was grounded and macerated with solvent (methanol or chloroform) for 24 h. The solvent was then eliminated along rotavapor. The yield of plant extract varied between 1.56 and 6.7%. Kinetics of growth of the 3 pathogens cultivable in liquid medium was determined before testing the impact of plant extracts and essential oils. Methanolic and chloroform plant extracts (EM1, EM2, EC1 and EC2) and essential oils (EO1, EO2) were compared for their antifungal potential. The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts was analyzed by GC/MS. Yield of essential oil varied between 0.7 and 1.2%. Therefore, antifungal activity of plant extracts and essential oils was evaluated using ELISA microplates with a blocked randomized design, as described previously (Parisi et al., 2013). The results obtained showed that EM2 at 7 mg/ml has a very high fungistatic activity against Fusarium culmorum, F. oxysporum and Penicillium italicum. It was characterized with a high amount of polyphenols, flavonoids and condensed tannins. Statistical analysis showed that the efficiency of methanol extracts significantly differed from those of the chloroform extracts. In addition, essential oils significantly reduced spores germination in a dose-dependent manner. Their fungistatic activity reached 100% at 6000 ppm. In conclusion, this work allowed us to open new perspectives on the application of extremophile plant extracts as novel biocontrol strategy against plant pathogens. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the Effect of Two Volatile Organic Compounds on Barley Pathogens
Kaddes, Amine ULiege; Parisi, Olivier ULiege; Berhal, Chadi ULiege et al

in Molecules (2016), 21(9),

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See detailHerbicidal activity of Tunisian plant extracts against various weeds
Ben Kaab, Sofiène ULiege; Parisi, Olivier ULiege; Ksouri, Riadh et al

Conference (2016, May 17)

In agricultural systems, weeds can dramatically reduce crop yields (by the constant competition for water and nutrients) and interfere with plant functions to suppress their growth causing huge economic ... [more ▼]

In agricultural systems, weeds can dramatically reduce crop yields (by the constant competition for water and nutrients) and interfere with plant functions to suppress their growth causing huge economic losses.Yield losses can reach up to 34% in crops. Plant extracts are known since a long time to have phytotoxicity potentialities and could be used as new natural compounds with bioherbicide activities. The study began with the selection of ten plant species suspected to be phytotoxic due to their wealth of phenolic, terpene and alcaloid compounds, such as flavonoids and phenolic acids coumarins. Then, three weeds were selected from Maghreb and European weeds as models (Phalaris minor, Sylibum marianum and Trifolium incanatum). Aerial plant materials were grounded and macerated with methanol for 24H. Methanol was then eliminated along rotavapor. The yield of plant extract varied between 5.29% and 29.71 % following the species. The essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger type apparatus (with a yield of 1.2%). Methanol extracts and the essential oil were then tested for their herbicidal activity in post-emergence assays against the three weeds species.The most active extracts were selected and formulated to increase their efficiency. Post-emergence bioassays consisted in spraying each extract at 3 concentrations (7500, 20000 and 340000 ppm) at 2 leaves stage . Pelargonic acid was used as commercial positive control at 34000 ppm. After 7 days on incubation in greenhouses, results showed that E6, presented poor phytotoxicity against three weeds at 7500 and 20000 ppm. However, E6 caused total wilting and several leaf blight against Phalaris minor and Trifolium incanatum and sever necrosis against Sylibum marianum. At that higher concentration of 34000 ppm. , the extracts E3 and E8 and the essential oil appeared also phytotoxic. The three extracts and the essential oil were selected for the formulation. After formulation to enhance the distribution, the coverage and the penetration of the active molecules at 34000 ppm, E3, E6, E8 and essential oil presented a high herbicidal activity compared with the extracts without formulation. E6 with the formulation has completely punctured Trifolium incanatum and suppressed growth of Phalaris minor and Sylibum marianum. The results of this study reveal that plant extracts, after formulation, are more effective in inhibiting weed growth. The strong weed suppressive ability of formulated E6 therefore offers interesting possibilities as an effective natural environment-friendly approach for weed management. [less ▲]

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