References of "Bax, J. J"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssociation of left ventricular global longitudinal strain with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis natural course and prognostic value
Vollema, E. M.; Sugimoto, T.; Shen, M. et al

in JAMA Cardiology (2018), 3(9), 839-847

IMPORTANCE The optimal timing to operate in patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) remains controversial. Left ventricular global longitudinal strain (LV GLS) may help to identify patients ... [more ▼]

IMPORTANCE The optimal timing to operate in patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) remains controversial. Left ventricular global longitudinal strain (LV GLS) may help to identify patients who might benefit from undergoing earlier aortic valve replacement. OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence of impaired LV GLS, the natural course of LV GLS, and its prognostic implications in patients with asymptomatic severe AS with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This registry-based study included the institutional registries of 3 large tertiary referral centers and 220 patients with asymptomatic severe AS and preserved LVEF (>50%) who were matched for age and sex with 220 controls without structural heart disease. The echocardiograms of patients and controls were performed between 1998 and 2017. EXPOSURES Both clinical and echocardiographic data were assessed retrospectively. Severe AS was defined by an indexed aortic valve area less than 0.6 cm2/m2. Left ventricular global longitudinal strain was evaluated on transthoracic echocardiography using speckle tracking imaging. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The prevalence of impaired LV GLS, the natural course of LV GLS, and the association of impaired LV GLS with symptom onset and the need for aortic valve intervention. RESULTS Two hundred twenty patients (mean [SD] age, 68 [13] years; 126 men [57%]) were included. Despite comparable LVEF, LV GLS was significantly impaired in patients with asymptomatic severe AS compared with age- and sex-matched controls without AS (mean [SD] LV GLS, -17.9% [2.5%] vs -19.6%[2.1%]; P < .001). After a median follow-up of 12 (interquartile range, 7-23) months, mean (SD) LV GLS significantly deteriorated (-18.0% [2.6%] to -16.3%[2.8%]; P < .001) while LVEF remained unchanged. Patients with impaired LV GLS at baseline (>-18.2%) showed a higher risk for developing symptoms (P = .02) and needing aortic valve intervention (P = .03) at follow-up compared with patients with more preserved LV GLS (≤-18.2%). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Subclinicalmyocardial dysfunction that is characterized by impaired LV GLS is often present in patients with asymptomatic severe AS with preserved LVEF. Left ventricular global longitudinal strain further deteriorates over time and impaired LV GLS at baseline is associated with an increased risk for progression to the symptomatic stage and the need for aortic valve intervention. © 2018 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 122 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGuía ESC/EACTS 2017 sobre el tratamiento de las valvulopatías
Baumgartner, A. D. G. D. T. H.; Falk, V.; Bax, J. J. et al

in Revista Espanola de Cardiologia (2018), 71(2), 117-118

[No abstract available]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail2017 ESC/EACTS Guidelines for the management of valvular heart disease
Baumgartner, H.; Falk, V.; Bax, J. J. et al

in European Heart Journal (2017), 38(36), 2739-2786

[No abstract available]

Detailed reference viewed: 952 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCorrigendum: '2017 ESC/EACTS Guidelines for the management of valvular heart disease' [Eur J Cardiothorac Surg, 52, (2017) (616-664)]doi 10.1093/eurheartj/ehx391
Falk, V.; Baumgartner, H.; Bax, J. J. et al

in European Journal of Cardio - Thoracic Surgery (2017), 52(4), 832-832

[No abstract available]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients presenting without persistent st-segment elevation: Task force for the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients presenting without persistent ST-segment elevation of the european society of cardiology (ESC)
Roffi, M.; Patrono, C.; Collet, J.-P. et al

in European Heart Journal (2016), 37(3), 267-315

This section summarises the diagnostic and therapeutic steps discussed in the previous sections. The goal is to outline the most important steps in the management of patients with NSTE-ACS. In each ... [more ▼]

This section summarises the diagnostic and therapeutic steps discussed in the previous sections. The goal is to outline the most important steps in the management of patients with NSTE-ACS. In each individual patient, decision making should take into account the patient's history (e.g. age, comorbidities), clinical presentation (e.g. ongoing myocardial ischaemia, haemodynamic or electrical instability), findings obtained during the initial assessment (i.e. ECG, cardiac troponin), timing and expected risk-benefit ratio of available therapies (i.e. pharmacological, invasive assessment, revascularization). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 1426 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail2015 ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of pericardial diseases
Adler, Y.; Charron, P.; Imazio, M. et al

in European Heart Journal (2015), 36(42), 2921-2964

[No abstract available]

Detailed reference viewed: 1074 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: Part 1: Clinical trial design principles
Stone, G. W.; Vahanian, A. S.; Adams, D. H. et al

in European Heart Journal (2015), 36(29), 1851-1877

Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology ... [more ▼]

Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. © 2015 American College of Cardiology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical Trial Design Principles and Endpoint Definitions for Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement: Part 1: Clinical Trial Design Principles A Consensus Document from the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium
Stone, G. W.; Vahanian, A. S.; Adams, D. H. et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2015), 66(3), 278-307

Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous etiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology ... [more ▼]

Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous etiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodeling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail2014 ESC/EACTS Guidelines on myocardial revascularization
The Task Force onMyocardial Revascularization of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC); The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS); Developed with the special contribution of the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) et al

in European Journal of Cardio - Thoracic Surgery (2014), 46(4), 517-592

National Cardiac Societies document reviewers: listed in Addenda The content of these European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Guidelines has been ... [more ▼]

National Cardiac Societies document reviewers: listed in Addenda The content of these European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Guidelines has been published for personal and educational use only. No commercial use is authorized. No part of the ESC Guidelines may be translated or reproduced in any form without written permission from the ESC. Permission can be obtained upon submission of a written request to Oxford University Press, the publisher of the European Heart Journal and the party authorized to handle such permissions on behalf of the ESC. Other ESC entities having participated in the development of this document: Associations: Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA), European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation (EACPR), European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI), European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), Heart Failure Association of the ESC (HFA). Working groups: Working Group on Cardiac Cellular Electrophysiology, Working Group on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy, Working Group on Cardiovascular Surgery, Working Group on Coronary Pathophysiology and Microcirculation, Working Group on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac Computed Tomography, Working Group on Peripheral Circulation, Working Group on Thrombosis, Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease. Councils: Council for Cardiology Practice, Council on Cardiovascular Primary Care, Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions. Disclaimer 2014: The ESC/EACTS Guidelines represent the views of the ESC and of the EACTS and were produced after careful consideration of the scientific and medical knowledge and the evidence available at the time of their dating. The ESC and the EACTS are not responsible in the event of any contradiction, discrepancy and/or ambiguity between the ESC/EACTS Guidelines and any other official recommendations or guidelines issued by the relevant public health authorities, in particular in relation to good use of healthcare or therapeutic strategies. Health professionals are encouraged to take the ESC/EACTS Guidelines fully into account when exercising their clinical judgment as well as in the determination and the implementation of preventive, diagnostic or therapeutic medical strategies; however, the ESC/EACTS Guidelines do not in any way whatsoever override the individual responsibility of health professionals to make appropriate and accurate decisions in consideration of each patient's health condition and, where appropriate and/or necessary, in consultation with that patient and the patient's care provider. Nor do the ESC/EACTS Guidelines exempt health professionals from giving full and careful consideration to the relevant official, updated recommendations or guidelines issued by the competent public health authorities, in order to manage each patient's case in light of the scientifically accepted data pursuant to their respective ethical and professional obligations. It is also the health professional's responsibility to verify the applicable rules and regulations relating to drugs and medical devices at the time of prescription. © 2014 European Society of Cardiology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 137 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAcute effects of initiation and withdrawal of cardiac resynchronization therapy on papillary muscle dyssynchrony and mitral regurgitation
Ypenburg, C.; LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULiege; Tops, L. F. et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2007), 50(21), 2071-2077

Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between dyssynchrony involving the mitral valve apparatus and the acute improvement in mitral regurgitation (MR) after cardiac ... [more ▼]

Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between dyssynchrony involving the mitral valve apparatus and the acute improvement in mitral regurgitation (MR) after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The effect of interruption of CRT at 6 months' follow-up on dyssynchrony and MR was also evaluated. Background Mitral regurgitation may improve acutely after CRT, but the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Methods Out of 63 consecutive patients with baseline MR, 25 patients showed an acute reduction in MR severity immediately after CRT. This selected group of 25 patients (age 68 +/- 10 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 23 +/- 8%) was evaluated in the current study. Echocardiography including speckle tracking strain analysis was performed at baseline, after CRT initiation, and during interruption of CRT at 6 months' follow-up to study the relationship between clyssynchrony between the papillary muscles and severity of MR. Results According to the inclusion criteria, all patients showed an immediate improvement in MR after CRT (vena contracta width decreased from 0.54 +/- 0.15 cm to 0.39 +/- 0.13 cm; p < 0.001), accompanied by an improvement in mitral deformation indexes. Furthermore, dyssynchrony between the papillary muscles decreased from 169 69 ms to 25 +/- 26 ms (p < 0.001). Importantly, these beneficial effects were maintained at 6 months' followup, but acute loss of resynchronization (from 26 +/- 28 ms to 134 +/- 51 ms; p < 0.001) was observed after interruption of CRT, with an acute recurrence of MR and worsening in mitral deformation indexes. Conclusions Cardiac resynchronization therapy can acutely reduce MR in patients with clyssynchrony involving the papillary muscles; interruption of CRT at 6 months' follow-up, however, resulted in acute loss of resynchronization with recurrence of MR. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 ULiège)