References of "Baudson, Caroline"
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See detailHow do Rhizobacterial Volatiles Influence Root System Architecture, Biomass Production and Allocation of the Model Grass Brachypodium distachyon?
Delaplace, Pierre ULiege; Ormeño - Lafuente, Elena; Nguyen, Minh ULiege et al

Conference (2016, January 12)

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly considered as a complement of conventional inputs in agricultural systems. Their effects on their host plants are diverse and include volatile ... [more ▼]

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly considered as a complement of conventional inputs in agricultural systems. Their effects on their host plants are diverse and include volatile-mediated growth enhancement. The present study aims at assessing the effects of bacterial volatile production on the biomass production and the root system architecture of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. (line Bd-21). An in vitro experimental set-up allowing plant-bacteria interaction through the gaseous phase without any physical contact was used to screen 19 bacterial strains for their growth promotion ability over a 10-day cocultivation period. Using principal component analysis followed by hierarchical clustering and two-way analysis of variance, five groups of bacteria were defined and characterized based on their combined influence on biomass production and root system architecture. The observed effects range from unchanged to highly increased biomass production coupled with increased root length and branching. Primary root length was only increased by the volatile compounds emitted by Enterobacter cloacae JM22 and Bacillus pumilus T4. Overall, the most significant results were obtained with Bacillus subtilis GB03 which induced a 81% increase in total biomass and enhanced total root length, total secondary root length and total adventitious root length by 88, 196 and 473% respectively. The analysis of the emission kinetics of bacterial volatile organic compounds is underway and should lead to the identification of volatile compounds candidates responsible for the observed growth promotion effects. Taking into account the inherent characteristics of our in vitro system, the next experimental steps are identified and discussed from a fundamental and applied viewpoint. [less ▲]

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See detailarchiDART: an R package for the automated computation of plant root architectural traits
Delory, Benjamin ULiege; Baudson, Caroline ULiege; Brostaux, Yves ULiege et al

in Plant and Soil (2016), 398(1), 351-365

Background and Aims In order to analyse root system architectures (RSAs) from captured images, a variety of manual (e.g. Data Analysis of Root Tracings, DART), semi-automated and fully automated software ... [more ▼]

Background and Aims In order to analyse root system architectures (RSAs) from captured images, a variety of manual (e.g. Data Analysis of Root Tracings, DART), semi-automated and fully automated software packages have been developed. These tools offer complementary approaches to study RSAs and the use of the Root System Markup Language (RSML) to store RSA data makes the comparison of measurements obtained with different (semi-) automated root imaging platforms easier. The throughput of the data analysis process using exported RSA data, however, should benefit greatly from batch analysis in a generic data analysis environment (R software). Methods We developed an R package (archiDART) with five functions. It computes global RSA traits, root growth rates, root growth directions and trajectories, and lateral root distribution from DART-generated and/or RSML files. It also has specific plotting functions designed to visualise the dynamics of root system growth. Results The results demonstrated the ability of the package’s functions to compute relevant traits for three contrasted RSAs (Brachypodium distachyon [L.] P. Beauv., Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. and Solanum lycopersicum L.). Conclusions This work extends the DART software package and other image analysis tools supporting the RSML format, enabling users to easily calculate a number of RSA traits in a generic data analysis environment. [less ▲]

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See detailarchiDART: Plant Root System Architecture Analysis Using DART and RSML Files
Delory, Benjamin ULiege; Baudson, Caroline ULiege; Brostaux, Yves ULiege et al

Computer development (2015)

Analysis of complex plant root system architectures (RSA) using the output files created by Data Analysis of Root Tracings (DART), an open-access software dedicated to the study of plant root architecture ... [more ▼]

Analysis of complex plant root system architectures (RSA) using the output files created by Data Analysis of Root Tracings (DART), an open-access software dedicated to the study of plant root architecture and development across time series (Le Bot et al (2010) DART: a software to analyse root system architecture and development from captured images, Plant and Soil, DOI: 10.1007/s11104-009-0005-2), and RSA data encoded with the Root System Markup Language (RSML) (Lobet et al (2015) Root System Markup Language: toward a unified root architecture description language, Plant Physiology, DOI: 10.1104/pp.114.253625). More information can be found in Delory et al (2015) archiDART: an R package for the automated computation of plant root architectural traits, Plant and Soil, DOI: 10.1007/s11104-015-2673-4. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of rhizobacterial volatiles on the root system architecture and the production and allocation of biomass in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv.
Delaplace, Pierre ULiege; Delory, Benjamin ULiege; Baudson, Caroline ULiege et al

in BMC Plant Biology (2015), 15(195),

Background Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly being seen as a way of complementing conventional inputs in agricultural systems. The effects on their host plants are diverse and include ... [more ▼]

Background Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly being seen as a way of complementing conventional inputs in agricultural systems. The effects on their host plants are diverse and include volatile-mediated growth enhancement. This study sought to assess the effects of bacterial volatiles on the biomass production and root system architecture of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. Results An in vitro experiment allowing plant-bacteria interaction throughout the gaseous phase without any physical contact was used to screen 19 bacterial strains for their growth-promotion ability over a 10-day co-cultivation period. Five groups of bacteria were defined and characterised based on their combined influence on biomass production and root system architecture. The observed effects ranged from unchanged to greatly increased biomass production coupled with increased root length and branching. Primary root length was increased only by the volatile compounds emitted by Enterobacter cloacae JM22 and Bacillus pumilus T4. Overall, the most significant results were obtained with Bacillus subtilis GB03, which induced an 81% increase in total biomass, as well as enhancing total root length, total secondary root length and total adventitious root length by 88.5, 201.5 and 474.5%, respectively. Conclusions This study is the first report on bacterial volatile-mediated growth promotion of a grass plant. Contrasting modulations of biomass production coupled with changes in root system architecture were observed. Most of the strains that increased total plant biomass also modulated adventitious root growth. Under our screening conditions, total biomass production was strongly correlated with the length and branching of the root system components, except for primary root length. An analysis of the emission kinetics of the bacterial volatile compounds is being undertaken and should lead to the identification of the compounds responsible for the observed growth-promotion effects. Within the context of the inherent characteristics of our in vitro system, this paper identifies the next critical experimental steps and discusses them from both a fundamental and an applied perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailRhizobacterial volatiles influence root system architecture, biomass production and allocation of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv.
Delaplace, Pierre ULiege; Ormeño-Lafuente, Elena; Delory, Benjamin ULiege et al

Conference (2015, June 18)

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly considered as a complement of conventional inputs in agricultural systems. Their effects on their host plants are diverse and include volatile ... [more ▼]

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly considered as a complement of conventional inputs in agricultural systems. Their effects on their host plants are diverse and include volatile-mediated growth enhancement. The present study aims at assessing the effects of bacterial volatile production on the biomass production and the root system architecture of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. (line Bd-21). An in vitro experimental set-up allowing plant-bacteria interaction through the gaseous phase without any physical contact was used to screen 19 bacterial strains for their growth promotion ability over a 10-day cocultivation period. Using principal component analysis followed by hierarchical clustering and two-way analysis of variance, five groups of bacteria were defined and characterized based on their combined influence on biomass production and root system architecture. The observed effects range from unchanged to highly increased biomass production coupled with increased root length and branching. Primary root length was only increased by the volatile compounds emitted by Enterobacter cloacae JM22 and Bacillus pumilus T4. Overall, the most significant results were obtained with Bacillus subtilis GB03 which induced a 81% increase in total biomass and enhanced total root length, total secondary root length and total adventitious root length by 88, 196 and 473% respectively. The analysis of the emission kinetics of bacterial volatile organic compounds is underway and should lead to the identification of volatile compounds candidates responsible for the observed growth promotion effects. Taking into account the inherent characteristics of our in vitro system, the next experimental steps are identified and discussed from a fundamental and applied viewpoint. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of an ex-vitro system allowing plant-bacteria interactions through VOCs in the context of water stress
Mendaluk, Magdalena ULiege; Baudson, Caroline ULiege; Delory, Benjamin ULiege et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Water stress is one of the major environmental factors limiting the crop productivity . Plant stress responses are very complex and drought tolerance may be linked to the presence of specific ... [more ▼]

Water stress is one of the major environmental factors limiting the crop productivity . Plant stress responses are very complex and drought tolerance may be linked to the presence of specific microorganisms in the rhizosphere. Indeed, some plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPR) strains have been found to improve plant growth under abiotic stresses. Among the many mechanisms by which those PGPR can support plant growth, the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their biological impact are still under study. The aim of this work is to evaluate the interaction between the model grass Brachypodium distachyon (Bd21) and two strains of PGPR. The impact of volatile emission on Bd21 growth was studied using an ex-vitro cocultivation system without physical contact between plant and bacteria during 10 days. This peculiar system was developed to assess bacterial VOCs impacts on plants under realistic growth and stress conditions. In parallel, the response of Bd21 seedlings to water deficit induced by polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) was studied to establish contrasted growth conditions regarding water availability [less ▲]

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See detailRhizobacterial volatile organic compounds implication in Brachypodium distachyon response to phosphorus deficiency
Baudson, Caroline ULiege; Saunier de Cazenave-Mendaluk, Magdalena ULiege; du Jardin, Patrick ULiege et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

In agriculture, phosphorus (P) is considered as the second most growth-limiting macronutrient after nitrogen. However, P fertilizers are produced from non-renewable resources. In this context, sustainable ... [more ▼]

In agriculture, phosphorus (P) is considered as the second most growth-limiting macronutrient after nitrogen. However, P fertilizers are produced from non-renewable resources. In this context, sustainable production strategies have to be developed to enhance P use efficiency of crops, e.g. based on naturally occurring biotic interactions that limit the negative impacts of P deficiency in soils. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) have already revealed their ability to promote plant growth and tolerance to abiotic stresses through many mechanisms. Among them, the bacterial volatile organic compounds-mediated communication between plants and PGPR is still poorly documented. Our research project aims at studying the capacity of a model cereal plant (Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. Bd21) to face P deficiency in interaction with PGPR. The prerequisite of this project consists in characterizing Bd21 response to P deficiency by measuring plant biomass production and allocation, root system architecture, total phosphorus content, root-secreted and intracellular acid phosphatase activity under various P concentrations. Those results will allow us to define P-limiting conditions, in order to assess PGPR volatiles influence on plant response to P deficiency. This approach will use an ex-vitro co-cultivation system allowing volatiles-mediated interaction and should help us to unravel the ability of rhizobacterial volatiles to enhance plant tolerance to P deficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailarchiDART: a R package allowing root system architecture analysis using Data Analysis of Root Tracings (DART) output files
Delory, Benjamin ULiege; Baudson, Caroline ULiege; Brostaux, Yves ULiege et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

In 2010, Le Bot et al presented a free and open-access software (Data Analysis of Root Tracings - DART) allowing the analysis of complex root system architectures from captured images, particularly across ... [more ▼]

In 2010, Le Bot et al presented a free and open-access software (Data Analysis of Root Tracings - DART) allowing the analysis of complex root system architectures from captured images, particularly across time series. Using this software, a user has to manually identify roots as a set of links. After vectorization of a root system, three final data sets (RAC, TPS and LIE) can be exported as table files containing several attributes for (a) each individual root (e.g. root length), (b) each observation day or (c) each point used to construct the vectorized root system respectively. These data sets can finally be used either to calculate derived root system architecture (RSA) parameters or to draw the root system architecture at selected observation dates. However when an experiment involves the analysis and comparison of many root systems, the calculation of RSA parameters for each data set and the drawing of the corresponding vectorized root systems become time-consuming. In this context, we developed a R package, called archiDART, allowing both the automatic calculation of common root architecture parameters and the X-Y plotting of vectorized root systems for selected observation dates. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of rhizobacterial volatile compounds on growth and root system architecture of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv.
Mendaluk, Magdalena ULiege; Varin, Sébastien; Baudson, Caroline ULiege et al

Poster (2013, February 08)

Many rhizobacterial strains are classified as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and are potentially useful to enhance plant fitness and productivity. Among the mechanisms by which PGPR improve ... [more ▼]

Many rhizobacterial strains are classified as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and are potentially useful to enhance plant fitness and productivity. Among the mechanisms by which PGPR improve plant growth, the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their biological impacts on plants remain little documented. The aim of this work is to evaluate the growth promotion ability of 19 bacterial strains on the model grass Brachypodium distachyon Bd21 (Bd21), with a focus on this peculiar mode of interaction. A collection of 19 strains was selected for their known growth promotion potential. The impact of the rhizobacteria on the model grass was studied using an in vitro cocultivation system allowing interactions through VOCs without physical contact between plants and bacteria. The results show that the VOCs of several strains promote total biomass production, modulate biomass partitioning and affect shoot and root architecture of Bd21. The effects of the PGPR strains emitting different volatile blends were investigated via principal component analysis coupled to clustering and univariate analysis to unravel their biological effects. On the basis of volatile emissions and of their effects on plant growth, two strains have been selected in order to evaluate such interactions using an ex vitro system. The set-up of this system is in progress. [less ▲]

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See detailImplication of microRNAs in the response of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. root system architecture to rhizobacterial volatiles
Baudson, Caroline ULiege; Bouché, Frédéric ULiege; Saunier de Cazenave, Magdalena ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2013, February)

The metabolic roles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and the identity of the molecules responsible for the growth promotion are still poorly ... [more ▼]

The metabolic roles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and the identity of the molecules responsible for the growth promotion are still poorly documented. As well, the implication of microRNAs in root development is a recent discovery that deserves to be explored. In this study, the implication of microRNAs in the response of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. Bd21 root architecture to rhizobacterial VOCs was investigated. Nineteen PGPR strains were screened to select those showing the strongest phenotypic effects. The strain Bacillus subtilis AP305-GB03 induced the most important promotion of biomass production and root development. Total RNA extraction and RT-qPCR analysis of microRNAs were performed on Bd21 root samples. The expression of miR160 a-d, miR164 f, miR167 c-d, miR397 b and miR399 a-b was measured in roots every 2 days during the first 10 days of Bd21 development, in the presence or absence of the bacterial VOCs. Differences in the expression profile of miR164 f and miR167 c-d were observed in the roots exposed to GB03 VOCs, as compared to the control. These differences could be correlated to the root system architecture modifications observed after 10 days of growth with GB03. miR397 b and miR399 a-b also showed differences in the expression profile of roots exposed to the bacterial VOCs. These microRNAs have been respectively involved in cold stress tolerance and in the response to phosphate starvation. [less ▲]

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