References of "Bastin, Christine"
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See detailHunting down the source: how amnesic patients avoid fluency-based memory errors
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

in Neuropsychology (in press)

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to test whether differences in the ability of amnesic and healthy participants to detect alternative sources of fluency can account for differences observed in ... [more ▼]

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to test whether differences in the ability of amnesic and healthy participants to detect alternative sources of fluency can account for differences observed in the use of fluency as a cue for memory. Method: Patients with severe memory deficits and matched controls were presented with three forced-choice recognition tests. In each test, an external source of fluency was provided by manipulating the perceptual quality of the studied items during the test phase. The detectability of the perceptual manipulation varied in each test (i.e., a 10%, 20%, or 30% contrast reduction were given). Results: The results indicated that all participants were able to rely on fluency when making recognition decisions as long as the perceptual manipulation remained unnoticed. Interestingly, our data also revealed that the level of contrast reduction at which the alternative source is detected differs between healthy controls and amnesic patients. Specifically, patients with amnesia appeared to disqualify fluency as a cue for memory even when the contrast reduction was moderate while healthy participants only disqualified fluency when the contrast reduction was clearly visible. Conclusion: Overall, our results seem to suggest that the ability to use fluency is probably not impaired in amnesia but undergo metacognitive changes resulting in the implementation of explicit or implicit strategies aiming at tracking alternative sources in order to reduce memory errors. [less ▲]

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See detailDo Alzheimer’s disease patients benefit from prior-knowledge in associative recognition memory?
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Folville, Adrien ULiege; Simoes Loureiro, Isabelle et al

in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (in press)

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See detailFamiliarity and recollection in normal and pathological aging: Studies on underlying mechanisms and neural correlates
Bastin, Christine ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, May 22)

A decreased capacity to remember past events is observed in healthy aging and is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Cognitive neuroscience research explores the nature of the memory processes that are ... [more ▼]

A decreased capacity to remember past events is observed in healthy aging and is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Cognitive neuroscience research explores the nature of the memory processes that are more specifically affected in normal and pathological aging. Notably, the distinction between recollection (i.e., recall of the encoding context of past events) and familiarity (i.e., judgments of oldness) has allowed to clarify the picture by showing dissociation between these two processes in healthy aging. In the course of Alzheimer’s disease, however, evidence for a dissociation between recollection and familiarity is mixed. Our work aims at understanding the neurocognitive architecture of recollection and familiarity by examining how these processes are modulated during aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Our research includes studies on variables that allow older people to reliably use familiarity to support memory decisions, studies on the source of subjective memory judgments in aging, and factors that may affect familiarity-based recognition memory in early Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of age on the temporal compression of daily-life events in episodic memory
Folville, Adrien ULiege; Jeunehomme, Olivier ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege et al

Poster (2019, May 14)

Recent evidence suggests that the dynamic flow of information that constitutes daily-life events is remembered as moments of prior experience separated by temporal gaps. To date, however, how aging ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence suggests that the dynamic flow of information that constitutes daily-life events is remembered as moments of prior experience separated by temporal gaps. To date, however, how aging impacts this process of compression of past experience in episodic memory has received little attention. To examine this question, young and older adults incidentally engaged in daily-life activities while wearing a camera. Subsequently, participants were cued with pictures taken by the wearable camera and were asked to mentally relive corresponding events in as much detail as possible. Results revealed that rates of temporal compression of events when remembering were similar in young and older adults. In both groups, these rates of compression were higher when remembering goal-directed actions compared to spatial displacements. Furthermore, the amount of detail within recalled moments did not differ between age-groups. Taken together, these results support the view that episodic memories represent the unfolding of events as compressed short-time slices of past experience. Our findings also suggest that these mechanisms of compression remain stable with increasing age which highlights the importance of using ecological approaches that capture the complexity of real-life events to examine age-related changes in episodic memory. [less ▲]

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See detailOlder adults do not always rely on the amount of episodic details when judging the subjective quality of their memories
Folville, Adrien ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

Poster (2019, May 14)

Although healthy aging is related to a decline in recollection asindexed by objective measures, the subjective experience of recollection remains stable.To date, however, studies have only examined these ... [more ▼]

Although healthy aging is related to a decline in recollection asindexed by objective measures, the subjective experience of recollection remains stable.To date, however, studies have only examined these age-related effects using aggregated data across trials, such that the relationship between subjective and objective measures of recollection on a trial-by-trial basis remains unknown. To address this question, young and older adults performed a cued recollection task of pictures that wereassociated with descriptive labels at encoding. At retrieval, participants were cued with the labels and were asked to rate the vividness of their memory of the picture and to recall as many details of the picture as they could.Multilevelanalyses revealed that, across trials, the relationship between subjective (vividness) and objective (free recall) recollection was stronger in young than inolder participants.However, when requested to recall the content of the picture before assessing vividness, older adults calibrated their subjective judgements on the amount of retrieved details to the same extent as young adults. These results provide evidence that older adults not only retrieve fewer episodic details but also rely on these details to a lesser extent than young adults for judging the subjective quality of their memories. [less ▲]

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See detailAn integrative framework of memory processes in humans
Bastin, Christine ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, March 27)

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See detailHow amnesic patients avoid fluency-based memory errors
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

Poster (2019)

The primary aim of this study was to test whether differences in the ability of amnesic and healthy participants to detect alternative sources of fluency can account for differences observed in the use of ... [more ▼]

The primary aim of this study was to test whether differences in the ability of amnesic and healthy participants to detect alternative sources of fluency can account for differences observed in the use of fluency as a cue for memory. To this end, patients with severe memory deficits and matched controls were presented with three forced-choice recognition tests. In each test, an external source of fluency was provided by manipulating the perceptual quality of the studied items during the test phase. The detectability of the perceptual manipulation varied in each test (i.e., a 10%, 20%, or 30% contrast reduction were given). The results indicated that all participants were able to rely on fluency when making recognition decisions as long as the perceptual manipulation remained unnoticed. Interestingly, our data also revealed that the level of contrast reduction at which the alternative source is detected differs between healthy controls and amnesic patients. Specifically, patients with amnesia appeared to disqualify fluency as a cue for memory even when the contrast reduction was moderate while healthy participants only disqualified fluency when the contrast reduction was clearly visible. Overall, our results seem to suggest that the ability to use fluency is probably not impaired in amnesia but undergo metacognitive changes resulting in the implementation of explicit or implicit strategies aiming at tracking alternative sources in order to reduce memory errors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (6 ULiège)
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See detailNovelty processing and memory impairment in Alzheimer’s disease: A review
Bastin, Christine ULiege; Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Moulin, Christopher et al

in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews (2019), 100

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See detailBehaviors speak louder than explicit reports: Implicit metacognition in 2.5- year- old children
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

in Developmental Science (2019), 22(2), 12742

Recent research has shown that children as young as age 3.5 show behavioral responses to uncertainty although they are not able to report it explicitly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that some ... [more ▼]

Recent research has shown that children as young as age 3.5 show behavioral responses to uncertainty although they are not able to report it explicitly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that some form of metacognition is already available to guide children’s decision before the age of 3. Two groups of 2.5- and 3.5- year- old children were asked to complete a forced- choice perceptual identification test and to explicitly rate their confidence in each decision. Moreover, participants had the opportunity to ask for a cue to help them decide if their response was correct. Our results revealed that all children asked for a cue more often after an incorrect response than after a correct response in the forced- choice identification test, indicating a good ability to implicitly introspect on the results of their cognitive operations. On the contrary, none of these children displayed metacognitive sensitivity when making explicit confidence judgments, consistent with previous evidence of later development of explicit metacognition. Critically, our findings suggest that implicit metacognition exists much earlier than typically assumed, as early as 2.5 years of age. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Integrative Memory model of recollection and familiarity to understand memory deficits
Bastin, Christine ULiege; Besson, Gabriel ULiege; Simon, Jessica ULiege et al

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2019)

Humans can recollect past events in details (recollection) and/or know that an object, person or place has been encountered before (familiarity). During the last two decades, there has been intense debate ... [more ▼]

Humans can recollect past events in details (recollection) and/or know that an object, person or place has been encountered before (familiarity). During the last two decades, there has been intense debate about how recollection and familiarity are organized in the brain. Here, we propose an Integrative Memory model which describes the distributed and interactive neurocognitive architecture of representations and operations underlying recollection and familiarity. In this architecture, the subjective experience of recollection and familiarity arises from the interaction between core systems storing particular kinds of representations shaped by specific computational mechanisms and an attribution system. By integrating principles from current theoretical views about memory functioning, we provide a testable framework to refine the prediction of deficient versus preserved mechanisms in memory-impaired populations. The case of Alzheimer’s disease is considered as an example because it entails progressive lesions starting with limited damage to core systems before invading step-by-step most parts of the model-related network. We suggest a chronological scheme of cognitive impairments along the course of Alzheimer’s disease, where the inaugurating deficit would relate early neurodegeneration of the perirhinal/anterolateral entorhinal cortex to impaired familiarity for items that need to be discriminated as viewpoint-invariant conjunctive entities. The Integrative Memory model can guide future neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies aiming to understand how such a network allows humans to remember past events, to project into the future and possibly also to share experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep fragmentation is associated with brain tau but not amyloid-β burden in healthy older adults
Chylinski, Daphné ULiege; Rudzik, Franziska; Coppieters't Wallant, Dorothe ULiege et al

Conference (2018, November 09)

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See detailArousals during sleep are associated with brain tau burden in healthy older individuals
Chylinski, Daphné ULiege; Rudzik, Franziska; Coppieters't Wallant, Dorothe ULiege et al

Poster (2018, October 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (7 ULiège)
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See detailOlder adults do not always rely on the amount of episodic details when considering the subjective vividness of their memories
Folville, Adrien ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

Conference (2018, September 28)

Although healthy aging has been related to a decline in recollection as indexed by objective measures (e.g., source memory or free-recall), the subjective experience of recollection (e.g., vividness of ... [more ▼]

Although healthy aging has been related to a decline in recollection as indexed by objective measures (e.g., source memory or free-recall), the subjective experience of recollection (e.g., vividness of memory) seems to remain stable. To date, however, behavioral studies have only examined these agerelated effects using aggregated data across trials, such that the relationship between subjective and objective measures of recollection on a trial-by-trial basis remains unknown. In this study, we conducted two experiments in which young and older adults performed a cued recollection task with pictures associated with descriptive labels at encoding. At retrieval, participants were cued with the labels and were asked to rate the vividness of their memory of the associated picture and to recall as many details of the picture as they could. In Experiment 1, multilevel analyses revealed that, across trials, the relationship between subjective (global vividness) and objective (free recall) recollection was greater in young than in older participants. Experiment 2’s results replicated and extended this finding by showing that, when requested to rate the vividness of more specific memory dimensions (e.g., persons and objects), older adults still did not calibrate their subjective judgements on the amount of retrieved episodic details to the same extent as young adults. These results provide direct evidence that, compared to young individuals, older adults rely to a lesser extent on the amount of retrieved episodic details to judge their subjective experiences while remembering. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (9 ULiège)