References of "BRUWIER, Annick"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailTraitements des fentes labio-palatines
BRUWIER, Annick ULiege; LOMBARD, Thomas

Scientific conference (2019, March 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULiège)
See detailOrthodontie et apnées du sommeil
BRUWIER, Annick ULiege

Speech/Talk (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of Rapid Maxillary Expansion on Respiratory Events in Children: Are we doing no Harm?
REMACLE, Sarah ULiege; HENDRIX, Charlotte ULiege; BRUWIER, Annick ULiege et al

in B-ENT (2019)

Introduction and Aim: Rapid maxillary expansion devices are used in children with upper maxillary transverse deficit and cross-bite. They were consistently shown to improve obstructive apnoea syndrome in ... [more ▼]

Introduction and Aim: Rapid maxillary expansion devices are used in children with upper maxillary transverse deficit and cross-bite. They were consistently shown to improve obstructive apnoea syndrome in children. However, the impact of the device in place into the child’s mouth has never been studied. The aim of our study was to quantify the effect of the device on respiratory events while in place. Secondary endpoints were to evaluate its impact on quality of life and on respiratory events after treatment. Material and Methods: 12 consecutive children with maxillary cross-bite were prospectively included in this cohort study. Respiratory events were recorded before, during and after rapid maxillary expansion using a validated type 3 polygraphy including jaw movements. Subjective outcomes were evaluated using Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)-18 quality-of-life questionnaire (OSA-18). Maxillary width and 16/26 distance were evaluated before and after rapid maxillary expansion on anterior radiography. Results: Estimated apnea hypopnea index increased from 2.67/h (±1.31/h) to 2.9/h (±2.4/h) with the device in place. Respiratory effort characterized by jaw motion > 0.4mm during the respiratory cycle increased from 7.58% (±10.01%) to 16.05% (±15.53%). Sleep-related breathing impairment was confirmed by parents’ questionnaires. Conclusion: While rapid maxillary expansion is an effective treatment for obstructive apnea syndrome in children, our study suggested a transient worsening of sleep breathing while the device is in place. It may be related to an incorrect tongue position and/or to the crowding of the device into the mouth. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of a Shift in Treatment Funding on a Multidisciplinary Sleep Clinic: a Cohort Study
VERMEIRE, Pierre ULiege; FANIELLE, Julien ULiege; BRUWIER, Annick ULiege et al

in B-ENT (2019)

Introduction and Aim: A shift in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) funding was implemented in Belgium on January 1, 2017. Funding was allowed for moderate to severe OSA and the rules shifted for treatments ... [more ▼]

Introduction and Aim: A shift in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) funding was implemented in Belgium on January 1, 2017. Funding was allowed for moderate to severe OSA and the rules shifted for treatments delivery and monitoring by authorised medical opinion. Multidisciplinary Sleep Clinics have long existed, bringing together sleep specialists, dentists, orthodontists and surgeons. We aimed to assess whether a shift in treatment funding was associated with a change in the multidisciplinary sleep practice. Material and Methods: Sample consisted of all patients discussed in the sleep multidisciplinary team meetings of the University Hospital of Liege from January 2016 to December 2018. Interrupted times series, Mann-Whitney U tests and descriptive statistics were produced. Results: There were no differences in patients age, male sex preponderance, body mass index, clinical presentation and level of obstruction. Baseline OSA severity was significantly lower (mean apnea-hypopnea index and mean oxygen desaturation index lowered respectively with p = 0.0189 and p = 0.0466) after the funding rules changed. Oral appliance and ENT surgery were more often offered after the shift in funding. Conclusion: Sleep multidisciplinary team meeting changed patient selection and management after the implementation of the new funding rules for OSA. The shift in funding often resulted in treatment options change, reaching more people and offering more options. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of rapid maxillary expansion on respiratory events in children: are we doing no harm?
HENDRIX, Charlotte ULiege; Bruwier, Annick ULiege; SEIDEL, Laurence ULiege et al

Conference (2018, November 09)

Introduction: Rapid maxillary expansion devices are used in children with upper maxillary transverse deficit and cross-bite. They were consistently shown to improve obstructive apnoea syndrome in children ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Rapid maxillary expansion devices are used in children with upper maxillary transverse deficit and cross-bite. They were consistently shown to improve obstructive apnoea syndrome in children. However, the impact of the device in place into the child’s mouth has never been studied. The aim of our study was to quantify the effect of the device on respiratory events while in place. Secondary endpoints were to evaluate its impact on quality of life and on respiratory events after treatment. Material and Methods: 12 consecutive children with maxillary cross-bite were prospectively included in this cohort study. Respiratory events were recorded before, during and after rapid maxillary expansion using a validated type 3 polygraphy including jaw movements. Subjective outcomes were evaluated using Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)-18 quality-of-life questionnaire (OSA-18). Maxillary width and 16/26 distance were evaluated before and after RME on anterior radiography. Results: Estimated apnea hypopnea index increased from 2.67/h (±1.31/h) to 2.9/h (±2.4/h) with the device in place. Respiratory effort characterized by jaw motion > 0.4mm during the respiratory cycle increased from 7.58% (±10.01%) to 16.05% (±15.53%). Sleep-related breathing impairment was confirmed by parents’ questionnaires. Conclusion: While rapid maxillary expansion is an effective treatment for obstructive apnea syndrome in children, our study suggested a transient worsening of sleep breathing while the device is in place. It may be related to an incorrect tongue position and/or to the crowding of the device into the mouth. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULiège)
See detailL’orthodontie adulte et pré-prothétique
Bruwier, Annick ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, March 05)

Orthodontie adulte et pré prothétique Depuis des années, le nombre de consultations des patients adultes en orthodontie augmente. Parmi les motifs de consultation de ces patients, on rencontre ... [more ▼]

Orthodontie adulte et pré prothétique Depuis des années, le nombre de consultations des patients adultes en orthodontie augmente. Parmi les motifs de consultation de ces patients, on rencontre l’alignement dentaire mais aussi des pathologies comme le syndrome des apnées obstructives du sommeil qui est de plus en plus diagnostiqué, les morsures palatines ou les fractures dentaires en cas de deep bite important provoqué notamment par l’augmentation des stress quotidiens, les pathologies ATM ou encore les difficultés d’hygiène dentaire correcte en cas d’encombrement dentaire important. Les progrès technologiques chirurgicaux, orthodontiques et parodontaux expliquent aussi cette hausse du nombre de consultations des patients adultes ainsi que l’avènement de techniques invisibles. Les particularités (croissance terminée, turnover osseux diminué, affaissement des tissus mous) des patients adultes et les risques de leurs traitements orthodontiques ainsi que les objectifs, principalement fonctionnels, de ces traitements seront exposés. Les différentes techniques innovantes utilisées au CHU de Liège seront analysées avec leurs avantages et leurs inconvénients afin de cibler la technique la plus appropriée au type de patient. Nous terminerons ensuite la présentation par des cas cliniques pluridisciplinaires. Un juste équilibre devra toujours être trouvé entre rétablir un alignement dentaire correct dans les limites du possible et une fonction satisfaisante de l’appareil masticateur. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (5 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-term stability of open bite treatments
Bruwier, Annick ULiege; THONNART, François ULiege; Gelin, Emilie ULiege et al

in Long-term stability of combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatments (2018, February 23)

The long-term stability of open bite treatments is very difficult to obtain due to several parameters (genetic, myofunctional or/and parafunctional diseases). Methods :17 adult patients suffering from ... [more ▼]

The long-term stability of open bite treatments is very difficult to obtain due to several parameters (genetic, myofunctional or/and parafunctional diseases). Methods :17 adult patients suffering from basal open bite were treated by a combined orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery. The surgery protocol was always a Lefort I osteotomy, except in case of class II, where a sagittal mandibular osteotomy was also performed in the same operation. Five parameters were taken into account to assess the long term stability of the treatment : Angle class, occlusal plane rotation, type and duration of retention after orthodontic treatment, tongue position and overbite. Results : we had a minimum 2-years observation after a combined orthodontic/orthognathic surgery treatment to evaluate the long-term stability of this type of treatment. Cephalometric parameters (Angle class, occlusal plane rotation, tongue position and overbite) measured at T2 and T3 showed a good long term stability after 2 years (T3). Conclusions : The posterior maxillar impaction must be more important than the anterior maxillar impaction to be the key to a long-term stability in open bite treatments. The tongue position is also a relevant element to maintain the right dental occlusion. A minimum one year combined with bimaxillar retention is also required to obtain a good and stable result of treatment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChirurgie d'avancée maxillo-mandibulaire dans le cadre d'un SAHOS sévère.
Systermans, Simon ULiege; Paulus, P; Bruwier, Annick ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPatient compliance and orthodontic treatment efficacy of Planas functional appliances with TheraMon microsensors
CHARAVET, Carole ULiege; LE GALL, Michel; Albert, Adelin ULiege et al

in Angle Orthodontist (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (21 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMise en évidence de l'activité neuronale par résonance magnétique fonctionnelle lors du port du froggy mouth: case report
PANS, Marine ULiege; BRUWIER, Annick ULiege; CHARAVET, Carole ULiege et al

Poster (2017, November 10)

Un appareil de rééducation de la déglutition atypique (interposition linguale entre les arcades dentaires lors de la déglutition) a été porté par un patient pour corriger sa béance dentaire antérieure ... [more ▼]

Un appareil de rééducation de la déglutition atypique (interposition linguale entre les arcades dentaires lors de la déglutition) a été porté par un patient pour corriger sa béance dentaire antérieure. Une IRMf a été réalisée avec et sans l'appareil afin de vérifier les zones de cerveau qui étaient stimulées car l'hypothèse est que l'appareil active les fibres motrices du nerf V. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (6 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAppareil Fonctionnel d'Expansion Transversale de Planas : Compliance et Efficacité
LEROY, Sophie; Albert, Adelin ULiege; BRUWIER, Annick ULiege et al

Poster (2017, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULiège)
See detailQu’attend un dentiste d’un radiologue concernant le patient enfant ?
Bruwier, Annick ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, January 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBruxisme Nocturne: Actualités et prise en charge
Grobet, P.; Gilon, Yves ULiege; Bruwier, Annick ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2017), 72(9), 410-415

Although well studied since the 50's, bruxism remains a largely unknown pathology. Its origin is complex, mixing psychological as well as neurological, odontological and hypnic aspects. However, the few ... [more ▼]

Although well studied since the 50's, bruxism remains a largely unknown pathology. Its origin is complex, mixing psychological as well as neurological, odontological and hypnic aspects. However, the few analyzes performed on this topic have allowed to set convincing etiopathological hypotheses, including central dysregulation of the dopaminergic system as well as of the neuro-masticatory system. To avoid harmful consequences as headaches, temporomandibular disorders and premature dental scuffs / fractures, it is mandatory to diagnose bruxism as early as possible. For this purpose, and in addition to anamnestic and clinical data, the practitioner can confirm diagnosis with polysomnography, including electromyographic study of masticatory muscles and audiovisual recording. Some orthodontic, pharmacological and psychological solutions have already proved efficient. Nevertheless, a better knowledge of causative neurobiological mechanisms would allow to foresee etiology-based treatments. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (13 ULiège)
See detailLa potée liégeoise : exploration de différents domaines
Bruwier, Annick ULiege

Conference (2016, November 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComment j'explore... une dysmorphose dento-maxillo-faciale.
Urbain, Valérie; GILON, Yves ULiege; BRUWIER, Annick ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2016), 71(9), 394-399

Dento-maxillofacial dysmorphoses represent a considerable area of maxillofacial surgery. Their incidence has constantly been on the rise since the beginning of the century. This can be explained by ... [more ▼]

Dento-maxillofacial dysmorphoses represent a considerable area of maxillofacial surgery. Their incidence has constantly been on the rise since the beginning of the century. This can be explained by variations in the food and society habits.We will first discuss the various causes (congenital and environnemental) and the pathophysiology of these disorders. Then, we will separate them according to the skeletal and Angle’s classifications. We will examine the predictive criteria of these dysmorphoses from the youngest age and consider their clinical and cephalometrical diagnosis We will envisage their functional and aesthetic consequences and expose the preventive options. Finally, we will describe the orthodontic and surgical treatment available today and conclude that surgery remains the gold standard by restoring the conventional axis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 167 (28 ULiège)