References of "Vander Auwera, Jacqueline"
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See detailPluton construction and deformation in the Sveconorwegian crust of SW Norway: magnetic fabric and U-Pb geochronology of the Kleivan and Sjelset granitic complexes
Bolle, Olivier ULiege; Diot, Hervé; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULiege et al

in Precambrian Research (2018), 305

The Kleivan and Sjelset granitic complexes are two composite plutons, containing both orthopyroxene and biotite (± hornblende) facies, emplaced in the Sveconorwegian (Grenvillian) high-grade basement of ... [more ▼]

The Kleivan and Sjelset granitic complexes are two composite plutons, containing both orthopyroxene and biotite (± hornblende) facies, emplaced in the Sveconorwegian (Grenvillian) high-grade basement of SW Norway. A structural study of these two plutons, based on the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) technique and combined with high-precision U-Th-Pb zircon dating, is presented here. Geochronological data demonstrate a rapid emplacement of successive magmatic pulses in the Kleivan complex (from 936.94 ± 0.42 Ma to 935.62 ± 0.67 Ma) and, on the contrary, a non-negligible rest period (~3.2 Ma) in the construction of the Sjelset complex that was formed by two pulses emplaced, respectively, at 935.67 ± 0.37 Ma and 932.43 ± 0.75 Ma. Locally discordant magnetic fabrics in the latter pluton confirm this rather protracted construction time. Thermomagnetic and hysteresis measurements supporting the AMS data indicate a magnetic mineralogy dominated by a multidomain, Ti-poor titanomagnetite, except in samples having a very low magnetic susceptibility. The susceptibility magnitudes, paramagnetic to ferromagnetic in agreement with the rock magnetic data, rely on the petrographic rock-types and on the alteration degree. Image analysis confirms that the magnetic fabric is usually coaxial with the shape fabric in both complexes, supporting the use of AMS as a proxy for the petrofabric orientation. Combined with micro- and macrostructural data, the magnetic fabric demonstrates that the Kleivan and Sjelset granitic complexes have their internal fabrics largely dominated by tectonic strain. Models of synfolding emplacement coeval with the last stage of Sveconorwegian contraction recorded in the area are proposed for the two plutons. [less ▲]

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See detailVolcanic influence of Mt. Fuji on the watershed of Lake Motosu and its impact on the lacustrine sedimentary record
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Yamamoto, Shinya et al

in Sedimentary Geology (2017)

Lacustrine sediments are particularly sensitive to modifications within the lake catchment. In a volcanic area, sedimentation rates are directly affected by the history of the volcano and its eruptions ... [more ▼]

Lacustrine sediments are particularly sensitive to modifications within the lake catchment. In a volcanic area, sedimentation rates are directly affected by the history of the volcano and its eruptions. Here, we investigate the impact of Mt. Fuji Volcano (Japan) on Lake Motosu and its watershed. The lacustrine infill is studied by combining seismic reflection profiles and sediment cores. We show evidence of changes in sedimentation patterns during the depositional history of Lake Motosu. The frequency of large mass-transport deposits recorded within the lake decreases over the Holocene. Before ~8000 cal yr BP, large sublacustrine landslides and turbidites were filling the lacustrine depression. After 8000 cal yr BP, only one large sublacustrine landslide was recorded. The change in sedimentation pattern coincides with a change in sediment accumulation rate. Over the last 8000 cal yr BP, the sediment accumulation rate was not sufficient enough to produce large sublacustrine slope failures. Consequently, the frequency of large masstransport deposits decreased and only turbidites resulting from surficial slope reworking occurred. These constitute the main sedimentary infill of the deep basin. We link the change in sediment accumulation rate with (i) climate and vegetation changes; and (ii) theMt. Fuji eruptions which affected the LakeMotosu watershed by reducing its size and strongly modified its topography. Moreover, this study highlights that the deposition of turbidites in the deep basin of Lake Motosu is mainly controlled by the paleobathymetry of the lakefloor. Two large mass-transport deposits, occurring around ~8000 cal yr BP and ~2000 cal yr BP respectively, modified the paleobathymetry of the lakefloor and therefore changed the turbidite depositional pattern of Lake Motosu. [less ▲]

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See detailMagma storage conditions and processes at Calbuco volcano (Central Southern Volcanic Zone, Chile)
Montalbano, Salvatrice ULiege; Namur, Olivier ULiege; Schiano, Pierre et al

Poster (2017, August 16)

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See detailCompositional gap at La Picada (CSVZ, Chile) results from critical cristallinity and compaction
Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULiege; Namur, Olivier ULiege; Coumont, Valentin et al

Poster (2017, August 16)

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See detailTectonic, human and climate signal over the last 4000 years in the Lake Amik record (southern Turkey)
El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULiege et al

Poster (2017, April)

This study investigates the upper sediments infilling the central part of the Amik Basin in Southern Turkey. The Amik Basin is located in a tectonically active area: it is crossed by the Dead Sea Fault, a ... [more ▼]

This study investigates the upper sediments infilling the central part of the Amik Basin in Southern Turkey. The Amik Basin is located in a tectonically active area: it is crossed by the Dead Sea Fault, a major neotectonic structure in the Middle East extending from the Red Sea in the South to the East Anatolian Fault Zone in the North. Continuous human occupation is attested since 6000-7000 BC in the Amik Basin. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Lake Amik occupying the central part of the Basin. Our objective is to constrain major paleo-environmental changes over the last 4000 years. The lake has been drained and progressively dried up since the mid-50s. The absence of water column during the summer season allows to collect lacustrine samples along a 5 meter depth trench with a sampling resolution of 1 to 2 cm. Diverse complementary methods were applied to characterize the sedimentary record: i.e. magnetic susceptibility, grain size, organic and inorganic matter by loss-of-ignition, mineralogy by X-ray diffraction and core scanner X-ray fluorescence (XRF) geochemistry. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon datings. Structural disturbances observed in the lacustrine sediments record are linked with major historical earthquakes from the 6th to the 9th century AD due to the Hasipasa Fault rupture. In addition to the tectonic influence, the sedimentary record clearly shows two periods indicating strong soil erosion in the lake catchment: (1) the most recent erosion phase occurs over the Roman period to Present; (2) the oldest one would have occurred during the Late Bronze period. Such changes are most probably related to change in land use. In term of climate influences, the mineralogical and geochemical results allow to evidence variations in chemical weathering conditions in the watershed and lake water level fluctuations, respectively. The clay mineral assemblages attest for significant pedogenesis transformations, especially during the Islamic/Ottoman period. Based on XRF results, an increase in potassium is attributed to a lake development phase during a wet phase An overflow of the Orontes River would be responsible for clay deposition. By contrast, increased calcium and strontium rather correspond to a low lacustrine level and a drier period. The Bronze and Iron/Hellenistic periods are both characterized by low lake level with limited contribution from the watershed. To conclude, our multiproxy study of the Lake Amik allows to decipher between tectonic, human and climate influences over the last 4000 years. Further step would be to compare the Amik record with other regional archives to evidence local and regional events. [less ▲]

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See detailSoil erosion in relation to land use changes in the Amik Lake sediments near the Antioch antique city during the last 4kyr
El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Lebeau, Héléne et al

in The Holocene (2017)

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region occupied since 6000-7000 BC has sustained a highly variable anthropic pressure culminating during the Late Roman Period when the Antioch city reached its ... [more ▼]

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region occupied since 6000-7000 BC has sustained a highly variable anthropic pressure culminating during the Late Roman Period when the Antioch city reached its golden age. The present 6m long sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of the Basin constrains major paleo-environmental changes over the last 4000 years using a multi-proxy analyses (grain-size, magnetic susceptibility and XRF geochemistry). An age model is provided by combining short-lived radionuclides with radiocarbon dating. A lake/marsh prevailed during the last 4kyrs with a level increase at the beginning of the Roman Period possibly related to optimum climatic condition and water channelling. The Bronze/Iron Ages are characterized by a strong terrigenous input linked to deforestation, exploitation of mineral resources and the beginning of upland cultivation. The Bronze/Iron Age transition marked by the collapse of the Hittite Empire is clearly documented. Erosion continues during the Roman Period and nearly stopped during the Early Islamic Period in conjunction with a decreasing population and soil depletion on the calcareous highland. The soil-stripped limestone outcrops triggered an increase in CaO in the lake water, and a general decrease in ZrO2 released in the landscape that lasts until the present day. During the Islamic Period, pastoralism on the highland sustained continued soil erosion of the ophiolitic Amanus Mountains. The modern Period is characterized by a higher pressure particularly on the Amanus Mountains linked to deforestation, road construction, ore exploitation and the drying of the lake for agriculture practices. [less ▲]

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See detailPaleoenvironmental implications in the dried lake sediments (Amik Lake, Southern Turkey)
El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULiege et al

Poster (2016, July)

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region has been continuously inhabited since 6000 – 7000 BC. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake located in the central part of the ... [more ▼]

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region has been continuously inhabited since 6000 – 7000 BC. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake located in the central part of the basin. Our objective is to constrain major paleo-environmental changes in the area over the last 4000 years and to unravel possible human impacts on the sedimentation. A diverse array of complementary methods was applied on the 6 m long record. Mineralogical (XRD), and geochemical (XRF) analyses were performed. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating. A high sedimentation rate of 0.12 cm/yr was inferred at the studied site. The 4000 years (since ~1800 BC) long record shows that significant fluctuations of the lake level and the riverine system inflow into the Amik Lake occurred. The Late Bronze lowstand led to punctual dryings of the lake at the end of the Bronze/Iron Age transition. At that time, the rivers yielded a large terrigenous input linked to strong soil erosion related mainly to deforestation and exploitation of mineral resources. During the Roman and later periods, upland soils were partly depleted and the riverine system completely transformed by channelization (anthropic) that led to a marshification of the Amik Basin [1]. Chemical and mineralogical composition of sediments is quite diversified reflecting the significant geological variation of drainage basins. Periods with strong aggradation linked to major increase in erosion were identified and characterized by high amount of Cr, Ni and Zr. Levels relatively rich in fluorite, richterite, enstatite, hornblende and chrysotile are a result of the erosion of the ophiolitic rocks from the surrounding Amanos Mountains. These levels are interpreted as periods of relatively high physical erosion, while more humid periods led to more intensive weathering. Consequently, the dominance of kaolinite, muscovite/illite and talc indicates a climate with contrasting seasons. During the most recent period a marked increase in terrigenous minerals associated with a rise in dolomite indicates ungoing erosion as well as the drying-out of the lake. [1] T.J. Wilkinson, L. Rayne, Water History, 2, 115-144 (2010). [less ▲]

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See detailChemical and mineralogical proxies of erosion episodes in the dried lake sediments (Amik Lake, Southern Turkey): paleoenvironmental implications
El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Lebeau, Héléne et al

Poster (2016, April 17)

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region has been continuously occupied since 6000-7000 BC. The landscape has sustained with highly variable anthropic pressure culminating during the Late Roman ... [more ▼]

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region has been continuously occupied since 6000-7000 BC. The landscape has sustained with highly variable anthropic pressure culminating during the Late Roman Period when the Antioch city reached its golden age. The basin also sustained a high seismic activity (M≥7) as it is a releasing step-over along the Dead Sea Fault. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of the Basin. Our objective is to constrain major paleo-environmental changes in the area over the last 4000 years and to unravel possible human impacts on the sedimentation. A diverse array of complementary methods was applied on the 6 m long record. High resolution of mineralogical (XRD) and geochemical (XRF) analyses were performed. Quantitative mineralogical phases of sediments by the Rietveld method were computed using Topaz software. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating, and checked using the correlation between the earthquake history and rapidly deposited layer identified. A high sedimentation rate of 0.12 cm/yr was inferred at the coring site. The 4000 years old record shows that significant fluctuations of the lake level and the riverine system inflow into the Amik Lake occurred. The Late Bronze lowstand leaded to punctual dryings of the lake at the end of the Bronze/Iron transition marked by the collapse of the Hittite Empire and during the Dark ages. At that time, the riverine was carrying a large terrigenous input linked to strong soil erosion related to deforestation, exploitation of mineral resources and the beginning of upland cultivation. During the Roman Period and in the later periods, upland soils were partly depleted and the riverine system completely transformed by channelization that leaded to a mashification of the Amik Basin. Chemical and mineralogical composition of sediments is quite diversified reflecting the significant geological variation of drainage basins. Abundant calcareous minerals, especially calcite, aragonite, dolomite and small amount of wollastonite characterize the different sedimentary levels recorded in the lake. Levels relatively rich in fluorite, richerite, enstatite, and wollastonite are a result of the erosion of the ophiolitic rocks from the surrounding Amanos Mountains. These levels are interpreted as corresponding to relatively high erosive periods, while more humid periods lead to more intensive weathering and consequently to the dominance of kaolinite, muscovite/illite and talc more advanced in the relative stability scale, indicating a climate with contrasting seasons. During the most recent Period a marked increase in terrigeneous minerals associated with a rise in dolomite indicates ungoing erosion as well as the drying-out of the lake. [less ▲]

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See detailNouvelles données sur un pigment noir d’origine cambrienne, utilisé au Paléolithique moyen et découvert dans la grotte Scladina (Andenne, Belgique)
Bonjean, D; Vanbrabant, Y; Abrams, G et al

in Notae Praehistoricae (2015), 35

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See detailTwo differentiation trends and parent magmas at Calbuco volcano (CSVZ, Chille)
Montalbano, Salvatrice ULiege; Schiano, Pierre; Cluzel, Nicolas et al

Poster (2015, August 19)

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See detailDeforestation and soil-loss linked to Bronze and Roman occupations recorded in the Amik Basin (Southern Turkey)
El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Lebeau, Hèlène et al

Conference (2015, July 27)

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See detailOrigine des fortes teneurs en fluorure dans les eaux souterraines du socle précambrien du Bénin central
Tossou, Yao ULiege; Gesels, Julie ULiege; Alassane, Abdoulkarim et al

Scientific conference (2015, June 25)

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See detailThe Sept Iles Intrusive Suite, Quebec, Canada
Namur, Olivier; Higgins, Michael; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULiege

in Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Latypov, Rais (Eds.) et al Layered Intrusions (2015)

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See detailMagmatic processes under Quizapu volcano, Chile, identified from geochemical and textural studies
Higgins, Michael; Voos, Stéphanie; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULiege

in Contributions to Mineralogy & Petrology (2015), 170

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See detailMelting of the primitive martian mantle at 0.5-2.2 GPa and the origin of basalts and alkaline rocks on Mars
Collinet, M.; Médard, E.; Charlier, Bernard ULiege et al

in Earth and Planetary Science Letters (2015), 427

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See detailA new Cambrian black pigment used during the late Middle Palaeolithic discovered at Scladina Cave (Andenne, Belgium)
Bonjean, Dominique ULiege; Vanbrabant, Yves; Abrams, Gregory et al

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2015), 55

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (2 ULiège)