References of "Parisse, Christophe"
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See detailThe influence of the token frequency on the generalization of construction schemas in French-speaking children with SLI
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Parisse, Christophe; Moulin, Mélissa et al

Poster (2012, June)

Constructivist approach (Goldberg, 1995 ; Tomasello, 2003) postulates that children build their linguistic system from their own linguistic experience. To be productive with their language, children have ... [more ▼]

Constructivist approach (Goldberg, 1995 ; Tomasello, 2003) postulates that children build their linguistic system from their own linguistic experience. To be productive with their language, children have to generalize construction schemas to never heard items. Because children with SLI seem to show limited morphosyntactic creativity and variability, we hypothesize that they would have difficulties to generalize their construction schemas what would hinder their access to the most abstract level of their linguistic competence. Given this lack of productivity of construction schemas in children with SLI, they would produce more lexicalized forms than abstract form what would lead to a limitation of the linguistic competence. The aim of our study was to test if children with SLI had more difficulties than children with typical language development (TLD) to generalize a schema to new items. Given the role of the token frequency in the abstraction of construction schemas (cf. Bybee, 1995), we decided to create a task in which we manipulated this variable. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalogical reasoning in children with specific language impairment
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULiege

in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics (2012), 26(4),

Usage-based theory considers analogical reasoning as a cognitive process required in language development. We hypothesized that difficulties with analogical reasoning could hinder the abstraction of ... [more ▼]

Usage-based theory considers analogical reasoning as a cognitive process required in language development. We hypothesized that difficulties with analogical reasoning could hinder the abstraction of construction schemas, thus slowing down morphosyntactic development for children with specific language impairment (SLI). We also hypothesized, in accordance with usage-based theory, that the same analogy mechanism is shared by linguistic and non-linguistic processes. The current study investigated the performance of 15 children with SLI in comparison with age-matched peers on a nonlinguistic analogical reasoning task. Our experimental setting targeted two prerequisites of analogical reasoning: structural alignment and the discovery of relational similarity in comparison with perceptual similarity. The results obtained are compatible with our hypotheses according to which children with SLI would encounter problems building more abstract construction schemas, related to difficulties with analogical reasoning. The study also shows that children with SLI have specific cognitive difficulties regardless of their linguistic development. [less ▲]

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See detailF-LARSP 1.0: An Adaptation of the LARSP Language Profile for French.
Maillart, Christelle ULiege; Parisse, Christophe; Tommerdahl, Jodi

in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics (2012), 2

The LARSP (Language Assessment, Remediation and Screening Procedure) (Crystal et al., 1976) is a linguistic profile commonly used by researchers and clinicians to carry out detailed analyses of the ... [more ▼]

The LARSP (Language Assessment, Remediation and Screening Procedure) (Crystal et al., 1976) is a linguistic profile commonly used by researchers and clinicians to carry out detailed analyses of the grammar and morphology of children’s spontaneous language samples. This paper discusses the methods used to adapt the profile from English to French using a large corpus of child language in order to accurately assign morphosyntactic structures to age-based stages. [less ▲]

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See detailF-LARSP: A Computerized Tool for Measuring Morphosyntactic Abilities in French.
Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULiege; Tommerdahl, Jodi

in Ball, Martin J.; Crystal, David; Fletcher, Paul (Eds.) Assessing Grammar: The Languages of LARSP. (2012)

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See detailMorphosyntactic disorders as a consequence of categorization difficulty in children with specific language impairment
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Parisse, Christophe; Duquet, Adèle et al

Poster (2011, July 21)

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See detailIncidental non linguistic regularities learning in Children with
Gabriel, Audrey ULiege; Meulemans, Thierry ULiege; Parisse, Christophe et al

Poster (2011, July)

Recent studies on specific language impairment (SLI) have suggested that language deficits could be partly explained by the Procedural Deficit hypothesis (PDH; Ullman & Pierpont, 2005). Tomblin et al ... [more ▼]

Recent studies on specific language impairment (SLI) have suggested that language deficits could be partly explained by the Procedural Deficit hypothesis (PDH; Ullman & Pierpont, 2005). Tomblin et al. (2007) and Lum et al. (2009; 2011) obtained data supporting this interpretation with the serial reaction time (SRT) task, as well as Evans et al. (2009) and Plante et al. (2002) with artificial grammar tasks. Recently, Gabriel et al. (2011) obtained contrasting results, showing that children with SLI were able to detect non linguistic regularities during a SRT task. The aim of this study was to assess the PDH by using a non-linguistic artificial grammar learning tasks in order to mimic real conditions of language acquisition. Twenty-three children with SLI and their typically developing (TD) peers are compared on a task in which the incidental learning sequence was presented through visual shapes via a laptop.These results confirm our previous study (Gabriel et al., 2011) by showing that children with SLI detect the rules in non-linguistic conditions. • So, contrary to results of previous studies (Evans et al., 2009; Lum et al., 2009; 2011; Plante et al., 2002; Tomblin et al., 2007), this study does not confirm the PDH in children with SLI, or at least suggests that, if present, the deficit of the procedural system in SLI is not going beyond the language system. [less ▲]

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See detailF-LARSP: une adaptation francophone du LARSP. Premières données
Maillart, Christelle ULiege; Parisse, Christophe; Tommerdahl, Jodi

Scientific conference (2011, June 17)

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See detailThe perceptual and verbal analogical reasoning in children with specific language impairment (SLI)
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Guénébaud, Mélanie; Parisse, Christophe et al

Poster (2011, June)

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See detailCategorization and abstraction of construction schemas in children with specific language impairment
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Duquet, Adèle ULiege; Parisse, Christophe et al

Poster (2010, September 10)

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See detailLinking abstract form and grammatical function : a construction-grammar experiment
Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULiege

Poster (2010, September 09)

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See detailLe manque de variabilité des schémas de construction comme facteur explicatif des difficultés morphosyntaxiques chez les enfants dysphasiques
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Moulin, Mélissa; Parisse, Christophe et al

Conference (2010, July 06)

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See detailAnalogical processes in language development in children with specific language impairment
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Um, Marelle; Parisse, Christophe et al

Poster (2010, June 26)

Constructivist approach (Goldberg, 1995; Tomasello, 2003) considers that analogical reasoning is a cognitive process which underlies the abstraction of the linguistic forms and the construction of more ... [more ▼]

Constructivist approach (Goldberg, 1995; Tomasello, 2003) considers that analogical reasoning is a cognitive process which underlies the abstraction of the linguistic forms and the construction of more abstract linguistic schemas. When children hear two utterances such as “John eats an apple” and “She sees a bird”, they can infer the abstract schema [Subject Verb Object] by realizing analogies between the two utterances. Morphosyntactic disorders encountered by children with specific language impairment (SLI) could be caused by problems with analogies, what would hinder their abstraction of construction schemas. Consequently, children with SLI would be less productive with their language and would use more fixed linguistic forms. Owing to these problems of generalization, the morphosyntactic development of children with SLI would be slow down [less ▲]

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See detailF-LARSP. French Language Assessment Remediation and Screening Procedure
Maillart, Christelle ULiege; Parisse, christophe; Tommerdahl, Jodi

Conference (2010, June)

This paper presents the adaptation of the LARSP (Language Assessment, Remediation and Screening Procedure) (Crystal et al., 1976) from English into French based on the analysis of a corpus of French ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the adaptation of the LARSP (Language Assessment, Remediation and Screening Procedure) (Crystal et al., 1976) from English into French based on the analysis of a corpus of French speaking children ranging between the ages of 18 months and 5 years. Included is a description of particularities of French morphosyntax and the ensuing adaptations that are reflected on the new French LARSP (F-LARSP) chart. The LARSP is a linguistic profile commonly used by researchers and clinicians to carry out “comprehensive and consistent linguistic analysis” (Ball, 1999); more specifically a detailed analysis of the grammar and morphology of children’s spontaneous language samples. The profile was developed in a manner that allows the user to clearly see the child’s grammatical strengths and weaknesses in relation to their chronological age. This is made possible by the notion that the order in which syntactic structures are acquired is relatively stable, at least until the approximate age of 5. Correlation of a child’s morphosyntactic production to their age provides the therapist with vital information regarding an array of areas including the possible diagnosis of language impairment, remediation planning, and measuring treatment efficacy carried out since the last profiling session. The tool is therefore useful for professionals working with children who are suspected of or who have been diagnosed with having forms of language difficulties such as Specific Language Impairment (SLI) where morphology and syntax are commonly affected. The utility of the LARSP, originally designed for Anglophone use, has led to its adaptation to several other languages. Those which have been published for an international audience include Welsh (1988), Dutch (1987), Irish (1990) and Persian (1998). [less ▲]

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See detailNouvelles propositions pour la recherche et l’évaluation du langage chez les enfants dysphasiques.
Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULiege

in Gruaz, C.; Jacquet-Pfau, C. (Eds.) Autour du mot : pratiques et compétences. (2010)

Les troubles spécifiques de développement du langage (TSDL), dont les formes sévères sont appelées dysphasies, sont caractérisés par un développement lent et anormal du langage. Par définition, les ... [more ▼]

Les troubles spécifiques de développement du langage (TSDL), dont les formes sévères sont appelées dysphasies, sont caractérisés par un développement lent et anormal du langage. Par définition, les enfants ayant ce type de trouble ne doivent pas présenter d’autres déficits attestés qu’ils soient cognitifs ou neurologiques. Il existe de nombreux profils développementaux de TSDL qui peuvent évoluer au cours de leur développement, ce qui les rend difficiles à caractériser. L’origine des TSDL est actuellement inconnue et les nombres études sur le sujet sont parfois contradictoires. Nous avançons un ensemble de propositions cliniques et théoriques pour remédier à ces difficultés : • Les TSDL sont un nom générique pour trois types de troubles clairement différenciés : la dyspraxie développementale verbale, la dysphasie linguistique , et les troubles pragmatiques du langage. • Il n'existe pas une cause unique pour les TSDL. Au contraire, chaque TSDL est la conséquence de la présence chez l’enfant d’une conjonction de déficits de base. • Chaque TSDL est le résultat d'un déroulement anormal du développement du langage. Ces anomalies apparaissent lorsque plus d'une partie du système est déficiente et que les mécanismes naturels de compensation du système deviennent inefficaces. • Les phénomènes de compensation sont eux-mêmes des phénomènes langagiers et de ce fait ils interfèrent avec l'évaluation langagière proprement dite. Pour comprendre le fonctionnement cognitif et langagier dans sa complexité, il est nécessaire pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge d’utiliser une évaluation de capacités sous-jacentes non-langagières. • Les bases neurologiques plausibles du langage et de son développement doivent être prises en compte pour offrir de nouvelles hypothèses et thèmes de recherche pour le travail futur sur les TSDL. [less ▲]

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See detailL'influence de la fréquence d'occurrence sur l'abstraction des schémas de construction linguistiques chez les enfants dysphasiques
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Moulin, Mélissa; Parisse, Christophe et al

Poster (2009, December 04)

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See detailDISLOCATIONS AS DEVELOPMENTAL MARKERS IN THE FRENCH LANGUAGE : DEVELOPMENTAL AND PATHOLOGICAL STUDIES
Maillart, Christelle ULiege; Parisse, Christophe; Gay-Perret, Nathalie

Poster (2009, June 06)

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See detailLes difficultés morphosyntaxiques des enfants présentant des troubles spécifiques du langage oral: une approche constructiviste
Leroy, Sandrine ULiege; Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULiege

in Rééducation Orthophonique (2009), 238

The Construction and Usage-based Theory (CUT) combines two main approaches drawn from cognitive linguistics: construction grammar and usage-based theory. The CUT emphasizes the fact that language ... [more ▼]

The Construction and Usage-based Theory (CUT) combines two main approaches drawn from cognitive linguistics: construction grammar and usage-based theory. The CUT emphasizes the fact that language structures progressively emerge through the use of general cognitive processes. Most new forms produced by a child are built upon his/her own previous productions that he/she complexifies and generalizes to construct more abstract forms. These hypotheses have been tested with normally-developing children but have not yet been tested on children with specific language impairment (SLI). In this paper, we put forward several hypotheses drawn from constructivistic approaches to explain morphosyntactic difficulties displayed by children with SLI. Their goal is to create a theoretical framework for future behavioral studies. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecific language impairment as systemic developmental disorders
Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULiege

in Journal of Neurolinguistics (2009), 22(2), 109-122

Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is a disorder characterised by slow, abnormal language development. Most children with this disorder do not present any other cognitive or neurological deficits. There ... [more ▼]

Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is a disorder characterised by slow, abnormal language development. Most children with this disorder do not present any other cognitive or neurological deficits. There are many different pathological developmental profiles and switches from one profile to another often occur. An alternative would be to consider SLI as a generic name covering three developmental language disorders: developmental verbal dyspraxia, linguistic dysphasia, and pragmatic language impairment. The underlying cause of SLI is unknown and the numerous studies on the subject suggest that there is no single cause. We suggest that SLI is the result of an abnormal development of the language system, occurring when more than one part of the system fails, thus blocking the system’s natural compensation mechanisms. Since compensation also hinders linguistic evaluation, one possibility for diagnosis and remediation control is to assess basic cognitive abilities by non-linguistic means whenever possible. Neurological plausible bases for language and language development should also be taken into account to offer new hypotheses and research issues for future work on SLI. [less ▲]

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See detailDislocations as a Developmental Marker in French Language: A Preliminary Study
Maillart, Christelle ULiege; Parisse, Christophe

in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics (2008), 22(4), 255-258

In a previous study, Parisse suggested that subject dislocations in French language (e.g. "la fille elle dort") could be considered as a marker of morphosyntactic development in children with normal ... [more ▼]

In a previous study, Parisse suggested that subject dislocations in French language (e.g. "la fille elle dort") could be considered as a marker of morphosyntactic development in children with normal language development. The present study aimed to develop this proposition and to confirm it with experimental data, more specifically the fact that this development would go through a four-step process. Our prediction was that children could produce forms that correspond to successive steps in the developmental process (for example, forms [1] and [2], or [2] and [3]), but not forms that were very different (for example, forms [1] and [4], or [2] and [4]). In order to test this hypothesis, a sentence repetition task was administrated to 27 children aged 4 to 5. The results confirm the presence of a developmental trend in the use of dislocation in spontaneous language. At age 4, dislocations were frequent (30%), and tended to respect the gender (stage 3 and 4). At age 5, dislocations were rare (stage 4). Previous stages (1 and 2) would be observed in younger children. [less ▲]

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