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See detailCharacterization and Evaluation of the Potential of a Diesel-Degrading Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Fresh Mangrove Sediment
Semboung Lang, Firmin ULiege; Destain, Jacqueline ULiege; Delvigne, Frank ULiege et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016)

Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous and persistent organic pollutants in the environment. In wetlands and marine environments, particularly in mangrove ecosystems, their increase and significant accumulation ... [more ▼]

Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous and persistent organic pollutants in the environment. In wetlands and marine environments, particularly in mangrove ecosystems, their increase and significant accumulation result from human activities such as oil and gas exploration and exploitation operations. Remediation of these ecosystems requires the development of adequate and effective strategies. Natural attenuation, biostimulation, and bioaugmentation are all biological soil treatment techniques that can be adapted to mangroves. Our experiments were performed on samples of fresh mangrove sediments from the Cameroon estuary and mainly from the Wouri River in Cameroon. This study aims to assess the degradation potential of a bacterial consortium isolated from mangrove sediment. The principle of our bioremediation experiments is based on a series of tests designed to evaluate the potential of an active indigenous microflora and three exogenous pure strains, to degrade diesel with/without adding nutrients. The experiments were conducted in laboratory flasks and a greenhouse in microcosms. In one case, as in the other, the endogenous microflora showed that it was able to degrade diesel. Under stress of the pollutant, the endogenous microflora fits well enough in the middle to enable metabolism of the pollutant. However, the Rhodococcus strain was more effective over time. The degradation rate was 77 and 90%in the vials containing the sterile sediments and non-sterile sediments, respectively. The results are comparable with those obtained in the microcosms in a greenhouse where only the endogenous microflora were used. The results of this study show that mangrove sediment contains an active microflora that can metabolize diesel. Indigenous and active microflora show an interesting potential for diesel degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailComprehensive comparison of the chemical and structural characterization of landfill leachate and leonardite humic fractions
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULiege; Richel, Aurore ULiege; Destain, Jacqueline ULiege et al

in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2016), 408(7), 1917-1928

Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous mixtures of organic compounds that occur everywhere in the environment. They represent most of the dissolved organic matter in soils, sediments (fossil ... [more ▼]

Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous mixtures of organic compounds that occur everywhere in the environment. They represent most of the dissolved organic matter in soils, sediments (fossil), water, and landfills. The exact structure of HS macromolecules has not yet been determined because of their complexity and heterogeneity. Various descriptions of HS are used depending on specific environments of origin and research interests. In order to improve the understanding of the structure of HS extracted from landfill leachate (LHS) and commercial HS from leonardite (HHS), this study sought to compare the composition and characterization of the structure of LHS and HHS using elemental composition, chromatographic (high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)), and spectroscopic techniques (UV–vis, FTIR, NMR, and MALDI-TOF). The results showed that LHS molecules have a lower molecular weight and less aromatic structure than HHS molecules. The characteristics of functional groups of both LHS and HHS, however, were basically similar, but there was some differences in absorbance intensity. There were also less aliphatic and acidic functional groups and more aromatic and polyphenolic compounds in the humic acid (HA) fraction than in the fulvic acid (FA) and other molecules (OM) fractions of both origins. The differences between LHS and HHS might be due to the time course of humification. Combining the results obtained from these analytical techniques cold improve our understanding of the structure of HS of different origins and thus enhance their potential use. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of temperature, pH and substrate composition on production of lipopeptides by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 629
Pereira Monteiro, F.; Vasconcelos de Medeiros, F.H.; Ongena, Marc ULiege et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research (2016), 10(36), 1506-1512

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See detailCharacterization and Evaluation of the Potential of a Diesel-Degrading Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Fresh Mangrove Sediment
Lang, Firmin Semboung; Destain, Jacqueline ULiege; Delvigne, Frank ULiege et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016), 227(2), 1-20

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See detailBiodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1
Lang, F. S.; Destain, Jacqueline ULiege; Delvigne, Frank ULiege et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016), 227(9),

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and ... [more ▼]

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons. With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biological way, a biodegradation experiment was conducted using mangrove sediments artificially contaminated with a mixture of four PAHs. The study used Rhodococcus erythropolis as an exogenous bacterial strain in order to assess the biodegradation of the PAH mixture by natural attenuation, biostimulation, bioaugmentation, and a combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation. The results showed that the last three treatments were more efficient than natural attenuation. The biostimulation/bioaugmentation combination proved to be the most effective PAH degradation treatment. © 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of phenazines and cyclic lipopeptides produced by pseudomonas sp. CMR12a in induced systemic resistance on rice and bean
Ma, Z.; Hua, G. K. H.; Ongena, Marc ULiege et al

in Environmental Microbiology Reports (2016)

Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a produces two different classes of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) (orfamides and sessilins), which all play a role in direct antagonism against soilborne pathogens. Here we show that ... [more ▼]

Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a produces two different classes of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) (orfamides and sessilins), which all play a role in direct antagonism against soilborne pathogens. Here we show that Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a is also able to induce systemic resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae on rice and to the web blight pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2 on bean. Plant assays with biosynthesis mutants of Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a impaired in the production of phenazines and/or CLPs and purified metabolites revealed that distinct bacterial determinants are responsible for inducing systemic resistance in these two pathosystems. In rice, mutants impaired in phenazine production completely lost their ability to induce systemic resistance, while a soil drench with pure phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) at a concentration of 0.1 or 1 μM was active in inducing resistance against M. oryzae. In bean, mutants that only produced phenazines, sessilins or orfamides were still able to induce systemic resistance against Rhizoctonia web blight, but a balanced production of these metabolites was needed. This study not only shows that Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a can protect rice to blast disease and bean to web blight disease, but also displays that the determinants involved in induced systemic resistance are plant, pathogen and concentration dependent. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailComplete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum S499, a rhizobacterium that triggers plant defences and inhibits fungal phytopathogens
Molinatto, G.; Puopolo, G.; Sonego, P. et al

in Journal of Biotechnology (2016), 238

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum S499 is a plant beneficial rhizobacterium with a good antagonistic potential against phytopathogens through the release of active secondary metabolites ... [more ▼]

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum S499 is a plant beneficial rhizobacterium with a good antagonistic potential against phytopathogens through the release of active secondary metabolites. Moreover, it can induce systemic resistance in plants by producing considerable amounts of surfactins. The complete genome sequence of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum S499 includes a circular chromosome of 3,927,922 bp and a plasmid of 8,008 bp. A remarkable abundance in genomic regions of putative horizontal origin emerged from the analysis. Furthermore, we highlighted the presence of genes involved in the establishment of interactions with the host plants at the root level and in the competition with other soil-borne microorganisms. More specifically, genes related to the synthesis of amylolysin, amylocyclicin, and butirosin were identified. These antimicrobials were not known before to be part of the antibiotic arsenal of the strain. The information embedded in the genome will support the upcoming studies regarding the application of B. amyloliquefaciens isolates as plant-growth promoters and biocontrol agents. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailPyoverdine and histicorrugatin-mediated iron acquisition in Pseudomonas thivervalensis
Matthijs, Sandra; Brandt, Nathalie; Ongena, Marc ULiege et al

in Biometals (2016), 29(3), 467-485

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See detailIn Situ Analysis of Bacterial Lipopeptide Antibiotics by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging
Debois, Delphine ULiege; Ongena, Marc ULiege; Cawoy, H. et al

in Nonribosomal Peptide and Polyketide Biosynthesis : Methods and Protocols (2016)

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See detailBiosynthesis, Chemical Structure, and Structure-Activity Relationship of Orfamide Lipopeptides Produced by Pseudomonas protegens and Related Species
Ma, Zongwang; Geudens, Niels; Kieu, Nam P. et al

in Frontiers in Microbiology (2016), 7

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See detailEffects of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria on Wheat Growth under Greenhouse and Field Conditions in combination with different nitrogen fertilizer levels
Nguyen, Minh ULiege; Ongena, Marc ULiege; Colinet, Gilles ULiege et al

Poster (2015, November 23)

Many Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are able to enhance root growth, mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency of crops. The aim of this project is to screen commercially available ... [more ▼]

Many Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are able to enhance root growth, mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency of crops. The aim of this project is to screen commercially available PGPR formulations and lab strains to increase wheat growth and yield in combination with an optimized nitrogen (N) fertilizer application scheme. This could lead to a significant reduction of N fertilizer application without affecting the subsequent grain yields. The screened products collection includes (1) Mix1 (a mix of Azospirillum sp., Azorhizobium sp., and Azoarcus sp.), (2) Mix2 (a mix of Mix1 complemented with two strains of phosphorus-solubilizing Bacillus sp.), (3) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens a, (4) B. subtilis, and (5) B. amyloliquefaciens b. These products were screened under greenhouse and field conditions in 2014 by using spring and winter wheat varieties, respectively. Under greenhouse conditions, there was a significant increase in root dry weight and in root per shoot ratio of plants inoculated with Mix1. Under field conditions, the interaction between PGPR inoculation and different N fertilizer doses was assessed. The grain yield was negatively impacted by low N fertilizer applications. Under such conditions, the inoculation of the wheat rhizosphere with B. subtilis increased the grain yield by 15% relative to the water control. However, in the field trial, the variability between plot replicates was high and lead to non-significant results. Based on these results, modified screening strategies for PGPR selection were set up for the next trials. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria-based Biostimulants on Wheat Growth under Greenhouse and Field Conditions
Nguyen, Minh ULiege; Ongena, Marc ULiege; Colinet, Gilles ULiege et al

Poster (2015, November 16)

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the main biostimulant classes due to their capacity of stimulating root growth and enhancing soil mineral availability, hence increasing nutrient use ... [more ▼]

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the main biostimulant classes due to their capacity of stimulating root growth and enhancing soil mineral availability, hence increasing nutrient use efficiency in crops. The aim of this study is to screen commercially PGPR-containing products to enhance wheat growth and yield in combination with an optimized nitrogen (N) fertilizer application scheme. This could lead to a significant reduction of N fertilizer application without affecting the subsequent grain yields. The screened products collection includes (1) Mix1 (a mix of Azospirillum sp., Azorhizobium sp., and Azoarcus sp.), (2) Mix2 (a mix of Mix1 complemented with two strains of phosphorus-solubilizing Bacillus sp.), (3) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens a, (4) B. subtilis, and (5) B. amyloliquefaciens b. These biostimulants were screened under greenhouse and field conditions in 2014 by using spring and winter wheat varieties respectively. There was a significant increase in root dry weight and in root per shoot ratio of plants inoculated with Mix1. Under field conditions, the interaction between PGPR inoculation and N fertilizer application was assessed. The grain yield was negatively impacted by low N fertilizer applications. Under such conditions, the inoculation of the wheat rhizosphere with Bacillus subtilis increased the grain yield by 15% relative to the water control. However, in the field trial, the variability between plot replicates was high and lead to non-significant results. Based on those results, modified screening strategies for PGPR selection were set up for the 2015 trials to reduce field variability and possibly achieve higher yield increases. [less ▲]

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See detailElicitor screening to protect wheat against Zymoseptoria tritici
Le Mire, Géraldine ULiege; SIAH, ALI; Deleu, Magali ULiege et al

Conference (2015, August 27)

Plants face an array of biotic and abiotic stresses in their environment, making it necessary to use various chemical inputs to maintain satisfactory yield. Today, conventional agriculture is evolving ... [more ▼]

Plants face an array of biotic and abiotic stresses in their environment, making it necessary to use various chemical inputs to maintain satisfactory yield. Today, conventional agriculture is evolving towards more sustainable practices, out of respect for human health and the environment. Elicitors are considered as promising biological control tools and draw major interest in IPM strategies. These plant-immunity triggering compounds, also called “stimulators of plant natural defenses”, induce a general and systemic resistance in the plant to various diseases. Although numerous elicitors have already been identified and some of them reached the market since the late 1970s, further investigations are still required to better understand the mode of action of these molecules in the plant and ensure a consistent efficiency under various field conditions. Few elicitors have yet been successfully tested and formulated to protect monocotyledonous crop plants such as wheat, which is cultivated over large areas in Europe. This study focuses on the screening of ten potential elicitor products of various origins and structures to protect winter wheat against the fungal pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. Greenhouse trials were carried out to measure the ability of the different products to reduce disease foliar symptoms (necrosis, chlorosis and pycnidia). Topical spraying treatments with 3 different concentrations of each product were carried out 5 days before pathogen inoculation. Disease severity (% of symptoms on the total surface of the third leaf) was then scored every 2 days up to 28 days post-inoculation. In addition, phytotoxicity and biocide activity of these products was evaluated under greenhouse and laboratory conditions, respectively. The corresponding results will be presented and discussed with the perspective to choose the best elicitor candidates and to undertake investigations on the signaling pathway and the influence of environmental parameters on the elicitation capacity. [less ▲]

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