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See detailExploration of consciousness: Disorders of consciousness & near-death experiences
Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, June 13)

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See detailFunction–structure connectivity in patients with severe brain injury as measured by MRI-DWI and FDG-PET
Annen, Jitka ULiege; Heine, Lizette ULiege; Ziegler, Erik et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2016), 37(11), 3707-3720

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See detailCo-activation Patterns in patients with disorders of consciousness
Di Perri, Carol ULiege; Amico, Enrico; Martial, Charlotte ULiege et al

Poster (2016, June)

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See detailA retrospective analysis of self-reported near-death experiences
CHARLAND-VERVILLE, Vanessa ULiege; Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Jourdan, Jean-Pierre et al

Poster (2016, March 04)

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See detailRepeated Behavioral Assessments in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Annen, Jitka ULiege; Aubinet, Charlène ULiege et al

Conference (2016, March 04)

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might ... [more ▼]

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might suffer from consciousness fluctuations, but it is not specified how many assessments are needed. The present study included 131 patients with DOC. They have been assessed at least 6 times during a 14-days period with the CRS-R. Results show that 5 CRS-R assessments are needed to reach a reliable diagnosis, and that all the CRS-R subscales are influenced by consciousness fluctuations. We here showed that consciousness fluctuations influence the behavioral diagnosis, and that 5 assessments within a short period of time are needed to get a reliable clinical diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping the functional traits of levels of consciousness
Amico, Enrico; Marinazzo, Daniele; Di Perri, Carol ULiege et al

Poster (2016)

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See detailImaging in Disorder of Self-Consciousness
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Conference (2015, December)

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See detailLes corrélats neuronaux de la conscience
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Conference (2015, October 16)

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See detailEtats de conscience altérée: évaluation clinique et techniques d'imagerie
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Conference (2015, October 07)

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See detailComparison of individuals’ susceptibility to false memory induced by both DRM and misinformation paradigms involving emotional material
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Dehon, Hedwige ULiege

Poster (2015, September)

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed ... [more ▼]

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed event is altered after exposure to misinformation about this event; Loftus et al., 1978) are due to errors in source monitoring processes (e.g., Johnson et al., 1993) and one might expect the correlation between these false memories quite positive. However, the few laboratory studies comparing the DRM paradigm and the misinformation paradigm show small (Zhu et al., 2013) or no correlation (Ost et al., 2013) between the false memories elicited by these procedures. However, these studies vary in terms of methodological details. For instance, false memories from the misinformation procedure involved emotional content while those from the DRM procedure only included neutral materials. This study investigated the relationship between false memories induced by two different paradigms (a DRM task and a misinformation procedure) both involving an emotional material. Participants (N = 154) completed an emotional variant of the DRM (neutral, positive and negative lists) and the misinformation (neutral, positive and negative images) procedures and their performances on both tasks were compared. Although both paradigms reliably induced false memories in participants, our analyses revealed only a marginally weak positive correlation (r = .147, p = .051) between misinformation and DRM false memories using emotional variants. These results support the idea that DRM and misinformation false memories are underpinned by (at least in part) different mechanisms and that the previous mixed results were not due to the specific content of the DRM or the misinformation task used. [less ▲]

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See detailControlled clinical trial of repeated left prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic minimally conscious state
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Wannez, Sarah ULiege et al

Poster (2015, June)

A recent study showed that single-session anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPF) transiently improves consciousness in 43% of ... [more ▼]

A recent study showed that single-session anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPF) transiently improves consciousness in 43% of patients in minimally conscious state (MCS) (Thibaut et al., 2014). We here test the potential effects and safety of repeated tDCS in severely brain-damaged patients with MCS. In this double-blind cross-over sham-controlled experimental design, we delivered two sessions of repeated (5 days of stimulation) tDCS, either anodal or sham in a randomized order. We stimulated the LDLPF cortex during twenty minutes in 20 MCS patients (12 men, aged 48±16 years, time since onset 78±95 months, 12 post-traumatic). Consciousness was assessed by the French adaptation of the Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R; Schnakers et al., 2008) before and after each stimulation. A treatment effect was observed for the comparison between CRS-R total scores at baseline and after 5 days of real tDCS (p<0.01). Behaviorally, 10/20 patients showed a tDCS-related improvement; 5 patients responded after the first stimulation and 5 other patients responded after 2, 3 or 4 days of stimulation. No side effect (e.g. epilepsy) was reported. Our results demonstrate that repeated (5 days) anodal LDLPF tDCS is safe and might improve signs of consciousness in about half of patients in MCS. It is important to note that the first session is not predictive for a future positive effect of the efficacy of the non-invasive electrical stimulation. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of individuals’ susceptibility to false memory induced by both DRM and misinformation paradigms involving emotional material
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Dehon, Hedwige ULiege

Poster (2015, May)

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed ... [more ▼]

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed event is altered after exposure to misinformation about this event; Loftus et al., 1978) are due to errors in source monitoring processes (e.g., Johnson et al., 1993) and one might expect the correlation between these false memories quite positive. However, the few laboratory studies comparing the DRM paradigm and the misinformation paradigm show small (Zhu et al., 2013) or no correlation (Ost et al., 2013) between the false memories elicited by these procedures but these studies vary in terms of methodological details. For instance, false memories from the misinformation procedure involved emotional content while those from the DRM procedure only included neutral materials. This study investigated the relationship between false memories induced by two different paradigms (a DRM task and a misinformation procedure) both involving an emotional material. Participants (N = 154) completed an emotional variant of the DRM (neutral, positive and negative lists) and the misinformation (neutral, positive and negative images) procedures and their performances on both tasks were compared. Although both paradigms reliably induced false memories in participants, our analyses revealed only a marginally weak positive correlation (r = .147, p = .051) between misinformation and DRM false memories using emotional variants. These results support the idea that DRM and misinformation false memories are underpinned by (at least in part) different mechanisms and that the previous mixed results were not due to the specific content of the DRM or the misinformation task used. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical Response to tDCS Depends on Residual Brain Metabolism and Grey Matter Integrity in Patients With Minimally Conscious State.
Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Di Perri, Carol; Chatelle, Camille ULiege et al

in Brain Stimulation (2015), 8(6), 1116-23

BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was recently shown to promote recovery of voluntary signs of consciousness in some patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). However, it ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was recently shown to promote recovery of voluntary signs of consciousness in some patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). However, it remains unclear why clinical improvement is only observed in a subgroup of patients. OBJECTIVES: In this retrospective study, we investigated the relationship between tDCS responsiveness and neuroimaging data from MCS patients. METHODS: Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and clinical electroencephalography (EEG) were acquired in 21 sub-acute and chronic MCS patients (8 tDCS responders) who subsequently (<48 h) received left dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPF) tDCS in a double-blind randomized cross-over trial. The behavioral data have been published elsewhere (Thibaut et al., Neurology, 2014). RESULTS: Grey matter atrophy was observed in non-responders as compared with responders in the left DLPF cortex, the medial-prefrontal cortex, the cingulate cortex, the hippocampi, part of the rolandic regions, and the left thalamus. FDG-PET showed hypometabolism in non-responders as compared with responders in the left DLPF cortex, the medial-prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the thalamus. EEG did not show any difference between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the transient increase of signs of consciousness following left DLPF tDCS in patients in MCS require grey matter preservation and residual metabolic activity in cortical and subcortical brain areas known to be involved in attention and working memory. These results further underline the critical role of long-range cortico-thalamic connections in consciousness recovery, providing important information for guidelines on the use of tDCS in disorders of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailNegative valence affects false working memories too
Dehon, Hedwige ULiege; Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Poster (2013, May 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (14 ULiège)