References of "Maquet, Pierre"
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See detailInteraction between hippocampal and striatal systems predicts subsequent consolidation of motor sequence memory.
Albouy, Geneviève; Sterpenich, Virginie; Vandewalle, Gilles ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(3), 59490

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See detailSleep stabilizes visuomotor adaptation memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
Albouy, Geneviève ULiege; Vandewalle, Gilles ULiege; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2013), 22(2), 144-54

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See detailBenevolent sexism alters executive brain responses
Dardenne, Benoît ULiege; Dumont, Murielle; Sarlet, Marie et al

in Neuroreport (2013), 24(10), 572-577

Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported ... [more ▼]

Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported in the literature. In this experiment, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to identify whether being the target of (sexist) benevolence induces changes in brain activity associated with a working memory task. Participants were confronted by benevolent, hostile, or neutral comments before and while performing a reading span test in an fMRI environment. fMRI data showed that brain regions associated previously with intrusive thought suppression (bilateral, dorsolateral,prefrontal, and anterior cingulate cortex) reacted specifically to benevolent sexism compared with hostile sexism and neutral conditions during the performance of the task. These findings indicate that, despite being subjectively positive, benevolence modifies task-related brain networks by recruiting supplementary areas likely to impede optimal cognitive performance. [less ▲]

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See detailExploration of the mechanisms underlying the ISPC effect: Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging data
Grandjean, Julien; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULiege; Fias, Wim et al

in Neuropsychologia (2013), 51

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest ... [more ▼]

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest since the original study by Jacoby (2003). Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the effect: associative learning of contingencies and item-specific control through word reading modulation. Both interpretations have received empirical support from behavioral data. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the responsible mechanisms of the ISPC effect with the classic two-item sets design using fMRI. Results showed that the ISPC effect is associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC), and inferior and superior parietal cortex. Importantly, behavioral and fMRI analyses specifically addressing the respective contribution of associative learning and item-specific control mechanisms brought support for the contingency learning account of the ISPC effect. Results are discussed in reference to task and procedure characteristics that may influence the extent to which item-specific control and/or contingency learning contribute to the ISPC effect. [less ▲]

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See detailIncrease in cortico-thalamo-cortical connectivity during human sleep slow wave activity
Kussé, Caroline ULiege; Lehembre, Rémy; Foret, Ariane et al

Poster (2012, October 27)

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See detailDifference in neural correlates of discrimination during sleep deprivation in PER3 homozygous
Shaffii-Le Bourdiec, Anahita; Muto, Vincenzo ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege et al

Poster (2012, September 07)

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See detailIncrease in cortico-thalamo-cortical connectivity during human sleep slow wave activity
Kussé, Caroline ULiege; Lehembre, Rémy; Foret, Ariane et al

Poster (2012, September 05)

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See detailIncrease in cortico-thalamo-cortical connectivity during human sleep slow wave activity
Kussé, Caroline ULiege; Lehembre, Rémy; Foret, Ariane et al

Poster (2012, September 04)

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See detailInfluence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythm on executive discriminative ability during a constant routine
Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; Meyer, Christelle ULiege; Muto, Vincenzo ULiege et al

Poster (2012, September)

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep ... [more ▼]

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep pressure associated to the deterioration in brain efficiency. When wakefulness is extended into the circadian night, maintenance of cognitive performance is jeopardized . Some individuals are very vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep loss and circadian misalignment, whereas others are resilient. These individuals differences can be readily explained within the conceptual framework of the circadian and homeostatic regulation of performance but also by individual genetic differences and notably the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism. In this experiment, we investigated the consequences of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance during a working memory task (3-back). Following the signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target from non-target stimuli is estimated by d prime (d') and criterion (cr). Here we assessed whether d' and cr were modulated by the raising sleep need and the oscillatory circadian signal. We also tested whether the individual vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism influences this cognitive modulation, which is also driven by the sleep/wake regulation. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythm on waking EEG oscillations during a constant routine
Muto, Vincenzo ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; Meyer, C et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012, September)

Human sleep and wake EEG oscillations are modulated by complex non-additive interaction between homeostatic and circadian processes. Quantitative analysis of EEG data, during extended wakefulness ... [more ▼]

Human sleep and wake EEG oscillations are modulated by complex non-additive interaction between homeostatic and circadian processes. Quantitative analysis of EEG data, during extended wakefulness, indicate that its frequency-specificity is influenced by both factors, such that low-frequencies (<8Hz) increase with time spent awake, thus more homeostatically-driven, while alpha activity undergoes a clear circadian modulation. Interindividual differences in sleep-wake regulation in young volunteers are associated with the variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the coding region of the circadian clock gene PERIOD3 (PER3). Individuals homozygous for the longer allele of PER3 (PER3 5/5) were reported to generate more slow wave activity during NREM sleep and theta activity during wakefulness, relative to individuals with the shorter allele (PER3 4/4). However, the phase and amplitude of circadian markers do not differ between these genotypes. Here we tested the hypothesis if fluctuations in the dynamics of waking EEG frequency-specificity are modulated by a polymorphism in the clock gene PER3, under 42h of sustained wakefulness. [less ▲]

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See detailDecoding spontaneous brain activity from fMRI using Gaussian Processes: tracking brain reactivation
Schrouff, Jessica ULiege; Kussé, Caroline ULiege; Wehenkel, Louis ULiege et al

in 2012 Second International Workshop on Pattern Recognition in NeuroImaging (PRNI 2012): proceedings (2012, July 03)

While Multi-Variate Pattern Analysis techniques based on machine learning have now been regularly applied to neuroimaging data, decoding brain activity is usually performed in highly controlled ... [more ▼]

While Multi-Variate Pattern Analysis techniques based on machine learning have now been regularly applied to neuroimaging data, decoding brain activity is usually performed in highly controlled experimental paradigms. In more realistic conditions, the number, sequence and duration of mental states are unpredictably generated by the individual, resulting in complex and imbalanced fMRI data sets. Moreover, in the case of spontaneous brain activity, the mental states can not be linked to any external or internal stimulation, which makes it a highly difficult condition to decode. This study tests the classification of brain activity, acquired on 14 volunteers using fMRI, during mental imagery, a condition in which the number and duration of mental events were not externally imposed but self-generated. Application of the obtained model on rest sessions allowed classifying spontaneous brain activity linked to the task which, overall, correlated with their behavioural performance to the task. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Human Sleep and Sleep-Dependent Memory Processing
Meyer, Christelle ULiege; Muto, Vincenzo ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege et al

in Frank, Marcos (Ed.) Sleep and Brain Activity (2012)

Wakefulness and sleep are associated with distinct patterns of neural activity and neuromodulation. In humans, functional neuroimaging was used to characterize the related changes in regional brain ... [more ▼]

Wakefulness and sleep are associated with distinct patterns of neural activity and neuromodulation. In humans, functional neuroimaging was used to characterize the related changes in regional brain metabolism and hemodynamics. Recent data combining EEG and fMRI described the transient responses associated with spindles and slow waves, as well as the changes in functional integration during NREM sleep. It was also shown that regional brain activity during sleep is influenced by the experience acquired during the preceding waking period. These data are currently interpreted in the framework of two theories. First, the use-dependent increase in slow oscillation during NREM sleep is associated with local synaptic homeostasis. Second, reactivations of memory traces during NREM sleep would reorganize declarative memories in hippocampal-neocortical networks, a systems-level memory consolidation which can be hindered by sleep deprivation. Collectively, these data reveal the dynamical changes in brain activity during sleep which support normal human cognition. [less ▲]

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See detailIncrease in cortico-thalamo-cortical connectivity during human sleep slow wave activity
Kussé, Caroline ULiege; Lehembre, Rémy; Foret, Ariane et al

Poster (2012, June 10)

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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on the brains regions underlying inhibition
Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; Grandjean, Julien ULiege; SALMON, Eric ULiege et al

Conference (2012, May)

Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme which degrades catecholamines, such dopamine, notably in the prefrontal cortex (Männistö & Kaakkola, 1999). A large number of studies reported an ... [more ▼]

Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme which degrades catecholamines, such dopamine, notably in the prefrontal cortex (Männistö & Kaakkola, 1999). A large number of studies reported an effect on executive functioning of COMT genotype (Barnett & al., 2007), each genotype being associated with a different COMT enzymatic activity (Weinshilboum & al., 1999). In an event-related fMRI study, a modified form of the Stroop task was administered to 45 young adults separated in three groups according to their COMT val158met genotype : 15 homozygous val/val (VV), 15 homozygous met/met (MM) and 15 heterozygotes val/met (VM). Both behavioral and fMRI results indicated the presence of a general interference effect consistent with prior reports (Nee & al., 2007). More interestingly, group comparisons indicate that this effect is associated, for a similar behavioral performance, with increased medial frontal and precentral gyrus activity in VV and VM groups by comparison with MM group. Conversely, no supplementary brain areas were observed for the comparison of the MM to the two other groups. These observations, paralleling with the lower COMT enzymatic activity and, thus, the higher cortical dopamine level in met/met individuals, confirms our expectation of a COMT Val158Met genotype modulation of the brain regions underlying inhibition efficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailCircadian preference modulates the neural substrate of conflict processing across the day
Schmidt, Christina ULiege; Peigneux, Philippe ULiege; Leclercq, Yves ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(1), 29658

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that ... [more ▼]

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that these preferences are not a simple by-product of socio-professional timing constraints, but can be driven by inter-individual differences in the expression of circadian and homeostatic sleep-wake promoting signals. Chronotypes thus constitute a unique tool to access the interplay between those processes under normally entrained day-night conditions, and to investigate how they impinge onto higher cognitive control processes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed the influence of chronotype and time-of-day on conflict processing-related cerebral activity throughout a normal waking day. Sixteen morning and 15 evening types were recorded at two individually adapted time points (1.5 versus 10.5 hours spent awake) while performing the Stroop paradigm. Results show that interference-related hemodynamic responses are maintained or even increased in evening types from the subjective morning to the subjective evening in a set of brain areas playing a pivotal role in successful inhibitory functioning, whereas they decreased in morning types under the same conditions. Furthermore, during the evening hours, activity in a posterior hypothalamic region putatively involved in sleep-wake regulation correlated in a chronotype-specific manner with slow wave activity at the beginning of the night, an index of accumulated homeostatic sleep pressure. These results shed light into the cerebral mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences of higher-order cognitive state maintenance under normally entrained day-night conditions. [less ▲]

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