References of "Croisier, Jean-Louis"
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See detailReturn to play after groin injury
Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Delvaux, François ULiege; LEHANCE, Cédric ULiege et al

Conference (2017, October 10)

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See detailTranslation and validation of the VISA-P questionnaire for French-speaking patients
Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege

in European Journal of Sports Medicine (2017, September), 5(supplement 1), 63

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See detailTraumatologie des sports olympiques de ballon en salle. Partie 2 : le handball
Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Roberjot, Mathieu; DELVAUX, François ULiege et al

in Journal de Traumatologie du Sport (2017)

Frequent often-rough contact between players explains why handball has one of the highest injury rates (mainly contusion) recorded at the LondonOlympic Games. Ankle injuries predominated. Head injuries ... [more ▼]

Frequent often-rough contact between players explains why handball has one of the highest injury rates (mainly contusion) recorded at the LondonOlympic Games. Ankle injuries predominated. Head injuries (commotion), shoulder injuries (dislocation and instability), and knee injuries (anteriorcruciate ligament tears) were also common. Wingmen are in constant activity both as attackers and defenders, making them the players with thehighest risk of injury. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring the effect of a second closely-timed PRP infiltration for tendinopathy
Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULiege; Le Goff, Caroline ULiege et al

in European Journal of Sports Medicine (2017, September), 5(Supplement 1), 20-21

INTRODUCTION: Although PRP is very popular in sport, especially since it was removed from the doping list, it remains controversed in literature (3). Up to now, there exists no general agreement on the ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Although PRP is very popular in sport, especially since it was removed from the doping list, it remains controversed in literature (3). Up to now, there exists no general agreement on the preparation and the use of PRP. Some clinical series have previously evaluated the effect of PRP in the treatment of proximal patellar tendinopathies. Although it is possible that a single infiltrative administration may prove to be an effective treatment for this indication, most of the existing studies evaluated the effects of two or three successive infiltrations. The multiplication of infiltrations is arguably likely to increase the risks of complications, and this treatment can be expensive. PURPOSE: We aimed to evaluate whether two infiltrations of PRP prove more effective than a single treatment. METHODS: Our study is a single blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial on leisure sportsmen with chronic proximal patellar tendinopathies, rebel to classical management, including physiotherapy, shock wave therapy… Twenty patients suffering from proximal patellar tendinopathies for over than 3 months were enrolled into the study. PRP was obtained using an aphaeresis machine (1). The subjects were split into two randomized groups and beneficed of 1 or 2 infiltrations of pure PRP, respectively. The one-year followup evaluation consisted of VAS, IKDC and VISAP scores, while algometer, isokinetic and ultrasounds evaluations were carried out up to 3 months. RESULTS: The concentration of the PRP used for each infiltration was similar in both groups (913.20 ± 65.60 × 103/ L for group 1 and 917.90 ± 63.08for group 2, with virtually no red (<0.001 × 106/ L) nor white cells (<0.001 × 103/ L) in either group). The VAS significantly decreased with time over the 3 month followup period (p = 0002), with no difference observed between the two groups (p = 0.2). Values obtained with the pressure algometer increased with time across both groups over the 3 month followup period (p < 0.0001), and values were significantly higher for Group 1 (p = 0.001). The IKDC score increased with time in both groups over the followup period (p = 0.034), with values again significantly higher for Group 1 (p = 0.0026). The VISAP score increased with time in both groups over the followup period (p = 0.0023), with no difference observed between the groups (p = 0.41). No improvements in isokinetic physical performance were observed in either group. However, pain during E30 significantly decreased over the 3 month followup period (p = 0.027) for patients in both groups. No improvement in either jumping performances or in pain was observed in either group during optojump evaluation. No improvements in US findings were observed. However, an increase of the sagittal hypoechoic area was observed in Group1 (p = 0.0038). After one year, 90% patients of group 1 did not report anymore pain during daily activities, in comparison with only 20% in group 2. In group 1, 20% of subjects still described pain during work activities and 40% during practicing sports versus 40% and 70%, respectively, in group 2. One patient in each group did not return to sport; both subjects still experienced pain through daily and occupational work activities. Six subjects among the group 1 (67%) and 7 among the group 2 (78%) returned to their former sport, and 55% of both groups to the former level than before the tendinopathy. However, 44% of the group 1 and 78% of the group 2 still experienced pain during sports activities. The practiced sports were football, handball, cycling, running, fitness.On the other hand, patients with only few months of symptoms did not evolved more favorably than those with symptoms for longer. CONCLUSIONS: The comparison between 1 or 2 infiltrations of PRP did not reveal any difference between the 2 groups after a followup period of 3 months. A second closely timed infiltration of PRP to treat proximal patellar tendinopathies is not necessary to improve the efficacy of this treatment in the short term (2). However, there remains a need to evaluate the longer term results. REFERENCES: Kaux JF, Croisier JL, Bruyere O, Rodriguez De La Cruz C, Forthomme B, Brabant G, Lapraille S, Lonneux V, Noel D, Le Goff C, Gothot A, Collette J, Crielaard JM. One injection of plateletrich plasma associated to a submaximal eccentric protocol to treat chronic jumper's knee. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2015 Sep;55(9):95361 Kaux JF, Croisier JL, Forthomme B, Le Goff C, Buhler F, Savanier B, Delcour S, Gothot A, Crielaard JM. Using plateletrich plasma to treat jumper's knees: Exploring the effect of a second closelytimed infiltration. J Sci Med Sport. 2016 Mar;19(3):2004. Kaux JF, Drion P, Croisier JL, Crielaard JM. Tendinopathies and plateletrich plasma (PRP): from preclinical experiments to therapeutic use. J Stem Cells Regen Med. 2015 May 30;11(1):717. A10 [less ▲]

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See detailPlatelet-rich plasma versus hyaluronic acid to treat tendinopathies
Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Robertjot, Mathieu; SAMSON, Antoine ULiege et al

in European Journal of Sports Medicine (2017, September), 5(Supplement 1), 21-22

INTRODUCTION: The treatment of patellar tendinopathies could be difficult. This is the reason why new treatments have been developed, among which platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. Some clinical ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: The treatment of patellar tendinopathies could be difficult. This is the reason why new treatments have been developed, among which platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. Some clinical series have previously evaluated the effect of PRP in the treatment of proximal patellar tendinopathies. Recent systematic review concluded that PRP could be recommend as a treatment in such indication (1). Recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies (2). Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on HA’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. PURPOSE: We aimed to compare the effect of PRP injection versus two injections of HA after three months on patients who have a proximal patellar tendinopathy. METHODS: Thirtythree sportsmen with proximal patellar tendinopathies being not relieved after minimum three months of normal physiotherapy treatments where included. Eighteen of them (group 1) have received a leukocyte poor PRP injection (obtained using an aphaeresis machine (3)) and the other fifteen (group 2) two HA injections, all of them have benefited of standardized rehabilitation. Concerning the evaluation of the pathology, algofunctional tests (visual analogic scale (VAS), pressure algometer, IKDC score, VISAP score), isokinetic (associated to VAS) along with the patellar tendon ultrasonography (US) have been realized over three times (preinjection, after 6 weeks, after 3 months postinjections). RESULTS: The results of VAS (p<0,01), algometric scores (p<0,01), IKDC scores (p<0,01) and VISAP (p<0,01) show a considerable improvement in the two groups, but not for the US findings. For the group 1, isokinetic tests show significative results for the hamstrings in C60°/s with an improvement of maximum peak torque (p=0,01) for the pathological member, a diminution (p>0,05) for the healthy limb and during the analysis of the bilateral difference (p=0,0002). For the group 2, the improvement of quadriceps maximum peak torque in C240°/s is significant (p>0,01) for the pathological knee after 6 weeks post injections only. The VAS associated with isokinetic tests decreases significantly for all contraction modes after three months of study. CONCLUSIONS: Both PRP and HA can improve the symptoms of proximal patellar tendinopathy, even if the results are slightly better in the PRP group. REFERENCES: Andia I et al., Plateletrich plasma in the conservative treatment of painful tendinopathy: a systematic review and metaanalysis of controlled studies. Br Med Bull. 2014 Jun;110(1):99115. Kaux JF et al., Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions. Muscles Ligaments Tendons J. 2016 Feb 13;5(4):2649. Kaux JF et al. Using platelet rich plasma to treat jumper's knees: Exploring the effect of a second closely timed infiltration. J Sci Med Sport. 2016 Mar;19(3):2004. [less ▲]

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See detailValidity and reliability of the French translation of the VISA-A questionnaire
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege

in European Journal of Sports Medicine (2017, September), 5(Supplement 1), 64

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See detailisokinetic profile of subjects with proximal patellar tendinopathy
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege; Libertiaux, Vincent ULiege; Kaux, Jean-François ULiege

in European Journal of Sports Medicine (2017, September), 5(Supplement 1), 65-66

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See detailReliability of a standardized protocol for bedside quadriceps strength measurement in critically ill patients
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULiege; Freycenon, Gaëlle ULiege; KELLENS, Isabelle ULiege et al

in Intensive Care Medicine Experimental (2017, September), 5(S2), 327

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See detailReliability of unipodal and bipodal counter movement jump landings in a recreational male population
Schwartz, Cédric ULiege; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULiege; Paulus, Julien ULiege et al

in European Journal of Sport Science (2017), 17(9), 1143-1152

Movement patterns during landing have been suggested to be related to injury risk. The purpose of this study was to determine the inter-session reliability of kinematic variables and ground reaction ... [more ▼]

Movement patterns during landing have been suggested to be related to injury risk. The purpose of this study was to determine the inter-session reliability of kinematic variables and ground reaction forces during landing in a population of male recreational athletes after a counter movement jump. Both unipodal and bipodal landings were evaluated. Furthermore, the possibility to improve landing reliability with a verbal instruction was also studied. Twenty- four male volunteers with no history of lower-extremity trauma were randomly assigned to two groups (with and without verbal landing instruction). An optoelectronic 3D system and force plates were used to measure the lower-limb joint angles and the ground reaction forces during landing. Intraclass correlation values show moderate to excellent inter-session reliability for the bipodal task (ICC average: 0.80, range: 0.46 to 0.97) and poor to excellent reliability for the unipodal task (ICC average: >0.75, range: 0.20 to 0.95). However, large standard errors of measurement values at the ankle joint at impact (27.6 ± 11.5°) and for the vertical ground reaction forces (394 ± 1091 N) show that some variables may not be usable in practice. The verbal instruction had a negative effect on the reliability of unipodal landing but improved the reliability of bipodal landing. These findings show that the reliability of a landing task is influenced by its motor complexity as well as the instruction given to the subject. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental and numerical investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of compliant mechanisms for deployable structures
Dewalque, Florence ULiege; Schwartz, Cédric ULiege; Denoël, Vincent ULiege et al

in Mechanical Systems & Signal Processing (2017), 101

This paper studies the dynamics of tape springs which are characterised by a highly geometrical nonlinear behaviour including buckling, the formation of folds and hysteresis. An experimental set-up is ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the dynamics of tape springs which are characterised by a highly geometrical nonlinear behaviour including buckling, the formation of folds and hysteresis. An experimental set-up is designed to capture these complex nonlinear phenomena. The experimental data are acquired by the means of a 3D motion analysis system combined with a synchronised force plate. Deployment tests show that the motion can be divided into three phases characterised by different types of folds, frequencies of oscillation and damping behaviours. Furthermore, the reproducibility quality of the dynamic and quasi-static results is validated by performing a large number of tests. In parallel, a nonlinear finite element model is developed. The required model parameters are identified based on simple experimental tests such as static deformed configurations and small amplitude vibration tests. In the end, the model proves to be well correlated with the experimental results in opposite sense bending, while in equal sense, both the experimental set-up and the numerical model are particularly sensitive to the initial conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailA Novel Accelerometer-Based Method for Stride Length Estimation
Boutaayamou, Mohamed ULiege; Schwartz, Cédric ULiege; Denoël, Vincent ULiege et al

Poster (2017, July 14)

We demonstrate the feasibility of accurately and precisely estimating the left/right average stride length from measured heel/toe accelerations in the gait of healthy, old adults. Our approach relies on ... [more ▼]

We demonstrate the feasibility of accurately and precisely estimating the left/right average stride length from measured heel/toe accelerations in the gait of healthy, old adults. Our approach relies on (1) a novel method that uses only accelerometer data without the need of additional data from, e.g., gyroscopes and/or magnetometers, and on (2) the validation of the results using reference 3D optoelectronic system data. [less ▲]

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See detailMaximal voluntary isometric contraction tests for normalizing surface EMG of scapular stabilizers muscles
Schwartz, Cédric ULiege; Tubez, François ULiege; Soulier, Maxime et al

Conference (2017, July 04)

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See detailHow much should you jump? Reproducibility evaluation of a 3-dimensional fatigability countermovement jump test
Paulus, Julien ULiege; Schwartz, Cédric ULiege; Tubez, François ULiege et al

Conference (2017, July 02)

Introduction With the stop jump, the counter movement jump (CMJ) is probably the most used jump in sport. In the literature, a number of studies use the counter movement jump to explore (neuro-)muscular ... [more ▼]

Introduction With the stop jump, the counter movement jump (CMJ) is probably the most used jump in sport. In the literature, a number of studies use the counter movement jump to explore (neuro-)muscular fatigability [1-4]. However, due to the continuous [1-3] (or semi-continuous [4]) character of the test, the CMJ become drop jumps from the second one. Nevertheless, the drop jump isn't the most frequent jump type in sport. These evaluations, with (semi-)continuous jumps, don't reflect the sport reality and therefore a more effective (neuro-)muscular jumping fatigability evaluation must be validated. Methods Nineteen volleyball players (23,5 ± 3,3 years, 187,6 ± 6,6 cm, 77,5 ± 8,5 kg), with no history of (major) lower limb injury, submitted to two jumping fatigability tests, with seven days between each session, under the direction of a single researcher. The jumping fatigability tests consists of the repetition of 50 maximal CMJ at the rate of 33bpm. Between each CMJ, the subject were asked to make a full triple-extension and to wait the next auditory and visual signal of the metronome to start the hip-knee-ankle flexion. With these instructions, each jump remains a CMJ. Subjects were asked to leap as high as possible from the first to the last CMJ. The jumping height was recorder for each jump with three dimensional camera. The reproducibility was assessed by Standard Error of Measurement (SEM), Minimal Difference needed to be considered real (MD), Coefficient of Variation (CV), Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) with 95% confidence interval, Effect Size Cohen (ES Cohen) with 90% confidence interval, paired Student's t-test, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC 2,1) with 95% confidence interval and Magnitude-Based Inferences (MBI). Results The results summary is available in the Table 1. In this table, only few parameters are presented and only for the partial sums of the first 10, 20, 25, 30, 40 and 50 jumps. Our analyses were based on the partial sums per interval of one jump and all statistical tests listed in "Methods" section have been considered. The partial sum with twenty-five CMJ have an excellent reproducibility (MBI with 0/99/1; ICC with 0.961 [0.902/0.985]; ES Cohen with -0.03 [-0.17/0.10]; PCC with 0.966 [0.911/0,987] and p-value < 0.0001). Moreover, it induce a great height decrease (-23%) and its duration (45.5 s) is similar to the recommendation for the knee fatigability isokinetic protocol [5]. MBI (+/trivial/-) Height decrease ICC (2,1) Test duration 10 0/100/0 -12,7% 0.967 18 s 20 0/99/1 -19,0% 0.964 36 s 25 0/99/1 -23,0% 0.961 46 s 30 0/98/1 -25,6% 0.955 55 s 40 0/98/1 -32,1% 0.950 73 s 50 0/98/2 -38,4% 0.943 91 s Table 1: reproducibility statistics results depending on the number of jumps considered (magnitude-based inferences (MBI) with percentage chances of better/trivial/worst retest vs test results; height jump decrease (last jump / better jump); ICC (2,1); test duration). Discussion Because of the (semi-)continuous character of a majority of fatigability jumping test [1-4], our test is the first, at our knowledge, to explore the reproducibility of a strict CMJ jumping fatigability task. Considering the statistical (relative and absolute) reproducibility results, twenty-five maximal CMJ seems to be the best compromise between reliability of the data and physiological interpretability of test's results. Indeed, its (relative and absolute) reproducibility is excellent and it induces a greater height decrease than shorter test while remaining similar in total duration than other fatigability tests which explore the anaerobic lactic system. References 1. Bosco et al, Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol, 51(3):357-364, 1983. 2. Cormack et al., Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 3(2):131-44, 2008. 3. Dal Pupo et al., J Sci Med Sport, 17(6):650-5, 2014. 4. Meckel et al., J Strength Cond Res, 29(8):2122-7, 2015. 5. Bosquet et al., Int J Sports Med, 31(2):82-8, 2010. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental characterisation of tape spring nonlinear compliant mechanisms
Dewalque, Florence ULiege; Schwartz, Cédric ULiege; Denoël, Vincent ULiege et al

Conference (2017, June 29)

Tape springs are compliant mechanisms used as alternative to kinematic joints, for example, in deployable space structures. To reach a detailed understanding of their highly nonlinear behaviour, involving ... [more ▼]

Tape springs are compliant mechanisms used as alternative to kinematic joints, for example, in deployable space structures. To reach a detailed understanding of their highly nonlinear behaviour, involving buckling, the formation of folds, nonlinear vibrations and hysteresis, an experimental set-up is designed. Dynamic and quasi-static tests are performed, as well as small amplitude vibration tests and large amplitude deployments in order to collect data in a broad variety of cases. The acquisition equipment consists of a 3D motion analysis system which triangulates the position of active markers and a force plate. The reproducibility of the acquisitions is assessed and the parameters affecting the measurements are identified. In the end, a finite element model is developed and correlated with the experimental results. [less ▲]

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See detailRelevance of early stretching in overhead athletes
Schwartz, Cédric ULiege; Tubez, François ULiege; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege et al

Conference (2017, June 16)

Overhead athletes often develop, over time, a tightness of the posterior structures of the shoulder, which may be associated with injuries. Ten symptomatic (with pain) and ten asymptomatic players with a ... [more ▼]

Overhead athletes often develop, over time, a tightness of the posterior structures of the shoulder, which may be associated with injuries. Ten symptomatic (with pain) and ten asymptomatic players with a tight shoulder were compared and the effect of a self-applied stretching program was evaluated. Before and after the stretching program, pain and stiffness of the shoulder were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that risk factors for shoulder pain such as glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and total range of motion deficit may only be limited in symptomatic athletes. The mobility of the shoulder was significantly improved after the stretching program for both groups. Pain was reduced when present. Because of the limited differences between the symptomatic and asymptomatic athletes, clinicians may find it advantageous to initiate early prevention or rehabilitation programs. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of the laboratory context and the size of the markers set on the tennis serve evaluation
Tubez, François ULiege; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULiege; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege et al

Conference (2017, June 15)

The purpose of this study was to identify the influence on the tennis serve evaluation of 1/ the test environment and 2/ the number of the markers placed of the player. Two different studies were ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to identify the influence on the tennis serve evaluation of 1/ the test environment and 2/ the number of the markers placed of the player. Two different studies were performed. The first compared a 4 vs. 28 marker set in a laboratory the same day. The second compared a 4 markers test in a laboratory with a 4 markers test on an official tennis court one week apart. We observed similar results between the different tests of both studies. [less ▲]

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See detailTraumatologie des sports olympiques de ballon en salle. Partie 1: le basket-ball
Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Roberjot, Mathieu; DELVAUX, François ULiege et al

in Journal de Traumatologie du Sport (2017), 34(2), 108-113

Basketball, handball and volleyball are three indoor ball sports played in the Olympic Games. An important solicitation of the upper limbs is acommon characteristic of these three sports. The main ... [more ▼]

Basketball, handball and volleyball are three indoor ball sports played in the Olympic Games. An important solicitation of the upper limbs is acommon characteristic of these three sports. The main objective of this review of the literature is to analyze the types of injury occurring in thesethree indoor ball games, looking for the specific localizations and their potential causes. Each sport will be discussed in a specific publication.Basketball is a very popular sport with a growing number of participants. The intensity of the game has increased as it has become more physical,leading to an increasing number of injuries. Ankle sprain is the most common injury in basketball. Back pain, finger fracture and tendon injury(jumper’s knee) or knee injury (anterior cruciate ligament tears) are also common. The main mechanism of traumatic injury is direct contact withthe opponent (during games) but there is also an increasing number of over-solicitation injuries. The length of time players must avoid sportsactivities after injury depends on the type of injury involved. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to manage a case of ischial tuberosity avulsion fracture?
Tyberghein, Maëlle; Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; GODON, Bernard ULiege et al

in The Future of Football Medicine (2017, May)

Introduction Apophyseal avulsion fractures of the pelvis are common among teenage football player. Usually, they are the result of a sudden forceful concentric or eccentric contraction of the muscle ... [more ▼]

Introduction Apophyseal avulsion fractures of the pelvis are common among teenage football player. Usually, they are the result of a sudden forceful concentric or eccentric contraction of the muscle attached to the apophysis. Indeed, before ossification, the apophyseal growth cartilage is the weakest point in the musculotendinous unit, making the apophysis vulnerable to injure. Athletes most commonly affected are soccer players when they tackle or shot powerful at goal and gymnasts during floor exercises which imposed sudden and excessive lengthening. Management of these fractures remains unclear. There are no guidelines between conservative and surgical approach even if most publications recommend a surgery if the diastasis exceeds 2cm and a conservative approach on the other hand. Case report A sixteen-year-old high-level player presented at the consultation with right ischial pain. Three months earlier, while he was sprinting, he had felt acute pain opposite the ischial tuberosity which compelled him to stop the training. He had already consulted another physician, who prescribed an X-ray which revealed an avulsion fracture of the ischial tuberosity with a maximal diastasis of 1.9 cm (Fig 1.a.). According to most publications (1,3), surgery is advisable from 2 cm of diastasis. 1.9 cm was within the range between a surgical and a conservative approach, and the conservative one was applied. An isokinetic assessment was planned. It highlighted hamstring strength imbalances with bilateral difference of 31% in concentric strength and 28% in eccentric strength in comparison with the healthy side. The mixed ratio of the hamstrings in eccentric mode at 30°/s to quadriceps in concentric mode at 240°/s was decreased to 0.8, while the lower limit in our clinical practice corresponded to 0.9. The patient was not allowed to resume competition and a rehabilitation by specific and progressive strengthening in both modes of contraction was initiated; in particular the eccentric training was initially submaximal and progressively intensified. Six weeks later, isokinetic assessment was repeated and showed significant improvement of right hamstring strength, particularly for eccentric contraction. The greatest improvement was the mixed Hecc/Qconc ratio wich had increased from 0.8 to 1.44. In regard to radiology, we observed no change since the previous X-Ray (Fig 1.b.). Intensified training on the field was allowed in order to resume competition. Less than one year after the injury, the patient restarted competition successfully with performance levels which were almost the same as before the injury. Discussion Many publications have discussed the surgical versus the conservative approach to treating ischiatic avulsion. Most of the published literature advocate the relevance of surgery when the diastasis exceeds 2 cm because widely displaced fractures may lead to chronic symptomatology if the treatment remains conservative. Different criteria, such as pain relief, ability to perform in sport, gross strength, activity score, X-Rays, are used by authors to demonstrate the recovery after treatment. No study accurately measured the hamstring strength before and after treatment. However, strength imbalance, especially as regards the H/Q mixed ratio, significantly increases the risk of sustaining hamstring injury in soccer player (2). For our patient, the rehabilitation enabled him to re-establish hamstring strength in six weeks with substantial improvement of eccentric assessment. The mixed Hecc/Qconc ratio increased from 0.8 to 1.44. This improvement significantly decreased the risk of recurrence of hamstring injury. Regarding X-Ray imagery, there was no evidence of healing. We advocate that radiological assessment should not be the main recovery criterion and that specific strengthening should be started even when avulsion persists on the X-Ray. Furthermore, hamstring strength should be measured accurately and objectively, e.g. by isokinetism, to be one of the main return to play criterion in association with clinical data. [less ▲]

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