References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailQuality of life assessment in musculo-skeletal health
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Biver, Emmanuel; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (2017), (Online First),

Musculoskeletal disorders affect morbidity, quality of life and mortality, and represent an increasing economic and societal burden in the context of population aging and increased life expectancy ... [more ▼]

Musculoskeletal disorders affect morbidity, quality of life and mortality, and represent an increasing economic and societal burden in the context of population aging and increased life expectancy. Improvement of quality of life should be one of the priorities of any interventions to prevent and treat musculoskeletal disorders in the ageing population. Two main approaches, namely generic and disease-specific instruments, can be applied to measure health-related quality of life. Among the generic tools available in scientific literature, the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and the Euroqol five item questionnaire (EQ-5D) are two of the most popular questionnaires used to quantify the health related quality of life in people with musculoskeletal disorders. However, because generic tools may not always be able to detect subtle effects of a specific condition on quality of life, a specific tool is highly valuable. Specific tools improve the ability to clinically characterize quality of life in subjects with a specific musculoskeletal disorder, as well as the capacity to assess changes over time in the QoL of these subjects. The recent development of specific tools should help to validate preventive and therapeutic interventions in this field. [less ▲]

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See detailOccurrence of Clinical Bone Fracture Following a Prolonged Stay in Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Controlled Study
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULiege; CAVALIER, Etienne ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2017), (Online),

Clinical consequences of critical illness and critical care (CC) on bone health remain largely unexplored. This retrospective study aimed to assess the number of new bone fractures (BF) following a ... [more ▼]

Clinical consequences of critical illness and critical care (CC) on bone health remain largely unexplored. This retrospective study aimed to assess the number of new bone fractures (BF) following a prolonged length of stay (LOS) in intensive care unit (ICU). Adults admitted in our tertiary ICU during 2013 with a stay [7 days were included (CC group). Patients who died in ICU or lost to follow-up were excluded. For each CC patient still alive after 2 years of follow-up, 2 control patients, scheduled for surgery during 2013, were recruited and matched for gender and age. Basal fracture risk before admission was calculated using FRAX tool. General practitioners were phoned to check out new bone fracture (BF) during 2 years after admission. Of the 457 enrolled CC patients, 207 did not meet inclusion criteria and 72 died during FU (median age 72 [65–77] years). New BF occurred in 9 of the 178 patients still alive at the end of FU (5%). Median age of these patients was 64 [53–73] years. Fractured patients did not differ from non-fractured ones based on demographic and clinical characteristics, excepting for FRAX risks that were higher in fractured patients. In the control group, 327 patients were analyzed. Their rate of BF was 3.4% without statistical significance compared to the CC group. FRAX risks were similar in both groups. The risk of new BF in CC group, expressed as an odds ratio, was 50% higher than in the control group without achieving statistical significance (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 0.62–3.77; p = 0.35). When comparing ICU survivors to patients who underwent uncomplicated surgery in the present preliminary study included limited cohorts, the fracture risk in the 2 years following prolonged ICU stay was not statistically higher. However, CC fractured patients had higher FRAX risks than non-fractured patients. Such screening could help to target prevention and appropriate treatment strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailCurrent review of the SarQoL®: a health-related quality of life questionnaire specific to sarcopenia
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Geerinck, Anton ULiege et al

in Expert Reviews of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research (2017), (On line),

INTRODUCTION: Sarcopenia, defined by a progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass and muscle function, is associated with many harmful clinical consequences. Several studies have reported the impact ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Sarcopenia, defined by a progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass and muscle function, is associated with many harmful clinical consequences. Several studies have reported the impact of sarcopenia on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) using generic quality of life (QoL) questionnaires. The results of these observational studies are quite heterogenous. Indeed, generic tools may not be able to detect subtle effects of sarcopenia on QoL. Recently, a sarcopenia-specific HRQoL questionnaire was developed and validated in a population of sarcopenic subjects to more accurately assess the impact of sarcopenia on QoL. Areas covered: The purpose of this review is to present evidence regarding the impact of sarcopenia on QoL and to introduce a new specific HRQoL questionnaire, the SarQoL®. Expert commentary: The self-administered SarQoL®, initially developed in French, comprises 55 items translated into 22 questions. The questionnaire has been shown to be understandable, valid, consistent, and reliable and can therefore be recommended for clinical and research purposes. The questionnaire is now available in 11 different languages with another 20 translations in progress. The instrument's sensitivity to change still needs to be assessed in future longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of protein, essential amino acids, B-Hydroxy B-Methylbutyrate, creatine, Dehydroepiandrosterone and fatty acid supplementation on muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance in older people aged 60 years and over. A systematic review of the litterature.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Rabenda, Véronique ULiege; Simmons, Michael et al

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (2017), (Online First),

Abstract: Objectives: The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to investigate the effects protein, essential amino acids (EAA), β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate (HMB), creatine ... [more ▼]

Abstract: Objectives: The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to investigate the effects protein, essential amino acids (EAA), β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate (HMB), creatine, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and fatty acid supplementation on muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance of elderly subjects. Methods: Using the electronic databases MEDLINE and EMBASE we identified RCTs published until February 2016 which assessed the effects of these nutrient supplementation on muscle strength, muscle mass or physical performance. Study selection and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers. Results: Search strategy allowed us to identify 23 RCTs. Among them, four used proteins as nutritional supplement, seven EAAs, six creatine, four DHEA and finally, two HMB. From our systematic review, it seems that the effects of these supplementations on muscle health are rather limited. Only consistent effects of EAA supplementation on physical performance (3 out of the 4 RCTs using EAA supplementation found significant effect of this supplementation on physical performance) and HMB supplementation on muscle mass (all the 2 identified RCTs using HMB supplementation found significant effect of this supplementation on muscle mass) have been found across studies. No consistent effects were found for the other types of dietary supplementation. Because of the important limitations in study design, inconsistency and lack of directness, the overall quality of the evidence was judged to be low or very low using the GRADE system. Conclusion: This systematic review showed a limited effect of nutritional supplementation on muscle mass, muscle power and physical function. Inconsistent positive effects were observed for some specific supplementations but the results only concerned one aspect of the muscle. Well designed and appropriately powered RCTs are needed to provide evidence for appropriate clinical recommendations. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study
Mouton, Alexandre ULiege; Gillet, Nicolas; Mouton, Flore et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(S1), 318

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See detailSurvey of ESCEO algorithm: methodology and results
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(S1), 635

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See detailConnected devices in musculo-skeletal health
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(S1), 88

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See detailRole of nutrition and physical exercise in maintaining intrinsic capacity
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(S1), 84

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See detailHealth outcomes of sarcopenia: a systematic review and metaanalysis.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Zaaria, M.; Pasleau, Françoise ULiege et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailResults of the SarcoPhAge study after 2 years of follow-up.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2017), 6 Suppl 1

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See detailHealth outcomes of sarcopenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Zaaria, M.; Pasleau, Françoise ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2017), 6 Suppl 1

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See detailL'étude SarcoPhAge: devenir des sujets sarcopéniques après 2 ans de suivi.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in L'Année Gérontologique (2017), 31(1), 42

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See detailReliability of muscle strength measures obtained with a hand-held dynamometer in an elderly population.
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Clinical Physiology & Functional Imaging (2017), 37(3), 332-40

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of a hand-held dynamometer for isometric strength measurements among nursing home residents. METHODS: The isometric muscle strength of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of a hand-held dynamometer for isometric strength measurements among nursing home residents. METHODS: The isometric muscle strength of nursing home residents was assessed for eight different muscle groups, using a hand-held dynamometer, the MicroFET2 device. Strength measurements were performed at baseline and after 4 days by the same operator and after 8 days by a second operator. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were computed to assess the relative reliability, whereas the minimal detectable change (MDC%) was calculated to assess the absolute reliability of the test-retest of the MicroFET2 used by one single operator or by two different ones. RESULTS: Thirty nursing home residents (75.0 +/- 11.2 years, 50% of women) were enrolled in this study. ICC of the test-retest with one single operator ranged from 0.60 (0.37-0.83) for the ankle extensors to 0.85 (0.74-0.95) for the elbow flexors. When considering the test-retest with two different operators, the ICC values ranged from 0.62 (0.41-0.84) for the ankle extensors to 0.87 (0.79-0.96) for the elbow extensors. For the absolute reliability, MDC% varies from 27.64 (elbow flexors) to 81.97 (ankle extensors) when performed in intra-observer. In interobserver condition, MDC%, respectively, varies from 24.38 (elbow extensors) 67.59 (ankle extensors). CONCLUSION: Using standardized protocol and standardized instructions to patients, a high relative and moderate absolute reliability was observed for all but ankle muscle groups, making this hand-held dynamometer a potential tool for research in the elderly population. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of concomitant bone and muscle wasting in elderly women from the SarcoPhAge cohort: preliminary results
Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2017), 6(1), 18-23

Background: Recent studies suggest that bone and muscle wasting are closely interconnected. Objective: The aim was of this study is to assess the prevalence of osteoporosis in a population of women ... [more ▼]

Background: Recent studies suggest that bone and muscle wasting are closely interconnected. Objective: The aim was of this study is to assess the prevalence of osteoporosis in a population of women diagnosed with sarcopenia. Participants, setting and design: We analyzed cross-sectional data of women, aged 65 years and above, for whom bone mineral density was available at the time of inclusion in the SarcoPhAge (Sarcopenia and Physical impairment with advancing Age) cohort, an ongoing prospective study with the aim to assess consequences of sarcopenia. Measurements: Muscle strength was evaluated with a hydraulic hand-dynamometer, appendicular lean mass and bone mineral density by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and physical performance by the Short Physical Performance Battery test (SPPB). Sarcopenia was diagnosed according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People definition, i.e. a low muscle mass plus either low muscle strength or low physical performance. A bone mineral density T-score equal to or below -2.5SD at the lumbar spine, at the total hip or at the femoral neck was used to define osteoporosis (World Health Organization definition). Results: A total of 126 women aged 74.38±6.32 years were included. Among them, 26 were assessed with sarcopenia (20.6%) and 34 (27.0%) with osteoporosis. There were more osteoporotic women among sarcopenic subjects (46.1%) than among non-sarcopenic subjects (22.0%) (p-value=0.011). A significant lower appendicular lean mass index was observed in osteoporotic women (p-value=0.025). We also observed, in osteoporotic subjects, a lower muscle strength (p-value=0.023). Numerical values of bone mineral density were lower in the sarcopenic population but the differences did not reach the level of statistical significance. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that muscle mass and strength are lower in patients with osteoporosis. Prospective changes in bone and muscle mass will be investigated during the follow-up of our cohort. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of calcium supplementation in healthy musculoskeletal ageing - An expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis ans Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF)
Harvey, N.C.; Biver, E.; Kaufman, J.-M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(2), 447-62

Abstract The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta ... [more ▼]

Abstract The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta-analyses of supplementation for fracture reduction, and associations with risk of myocardial infarction have been suggested in recent years. In this report, the product of an expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF), we review the evidence for the value of calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D supplementation, for healthy musculoskeletal ageing.We conclude that (1) calcium and vitamin D supplementation leads to a modest reduction in fracture risk, although population-level intervention has not been shown to be an effective public health strategy; (2) supplementation with calcium alone for fracture reduction is not supported by the literature; (3) side effects of calcium supplementation include renal stones and gastrointestinal symptoms; (4) vitamin D supplementation, rather than calcium supplementation, may reduce falls risk; and (5) assertions of increased cardiovascular risk consequent to calciumsupplementation are not convincingly supported by current evidence. In conclusion, we recommend, on the basis of the current evidence, that calcium supplementation, with concomitant vitamin D supplementation, is supported for patients at high risk of calcium and vitamin D insufficiency, and in those who are receiving treatment for osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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